Domori’s venture into organic chocolate produces promising yields and gives the rest of the competition a run for their money. Organic chocolate seems to be an exploding fad recently, and with bars such as Absolute on the market, perceptions will be re-shaped to view the word “”organic”" with a little more respect.

The word “”Chacao”" stems from Maya civilization and translates to “”warmth.”" The cacao is of Trinitario genotype and is grown on the Dominican Republic through the Conacado cocoa planters association. The cooperative consists of approximately 4,900 members with each consituent family managing 1-5 hectares of land.


Reviews

Alex Rast: 6-Oct-2005

Posted: October 6, 2005 by
SCORES Score/10 Weight
Aroma: 9 10%
Look/snap: 7 5%
Taste: 9.5 35%
Melt: 9.5 5%
Length: 9 15%
Opinion: 9 30%
Total/100: 91 100%
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Finally, organic chocolate has come all the way and produced a bar that can meet the very greatest chocolates in the world on equal terms. This is not merely a great chocolate, it is one of Domori’s crown jewels in a company whose chocolates include the sublime Porcelana and Puertomar. It could be said in many ways to convey the very essence of chocolatiness in its flavour, while dazzling with an array of complex highlights and backgrounds that leave the palate spinning in ecstasy. From now on, discussion of organic chocolate need not be prefaced with a qualifier that in the limit, it can’t be as good as the best conventional chocolate. It can.

Domori has very thoughtfully chosen a near-optimal format for its organic chocolate – a long, thin, 50g bar, more or less the ideal size. The plastic inner wrapper is disappointing but standard for Domori so one must let the chocolate air for a few minutes. The bar itself looks reasonable but some large bubbles and rippling on the bottom indicate somewhat hasty moulding. Colour is a dark, earthy brown, neither purple nor red: the colour of rich topsoil. Aroma is pungent and complex, starting with a strong cherry burst with flashes of olive, then moving to a hint of tropical fruits on a grassy background, almost like a modulation of the original aroma. A floral perfume makes its appearance at the end, nice and subtle, and making for a most alluring entrance.

The flavour promises well from the outset and simply does not let up. Initial flavour is a lovely strawberry, cherry, and cream blend reminiscent of top-notch Criollo beans. However, soon the main flavour takes hold, a powerful, bold chocolatey flavour, that elusive “”perfect”" balance one hopes for. It’s both intense and long-lasting, just building and building. The tropical hints in the aroma carry through into the flavour as well, and finally the chocolate ends in a nutty, woody finish, similar to walnuts. In one chocolate you get virtually a complete exploration of the flavour spectrum chocolate can possess.

As if the flavour weren’t enough to make this great, the texture is also Domori’s best, hyper-smooth and just beyond hyper-creamy, an unbelievable achievement that only Hachez surpasses. Furthermore, Domori does all this without extra cocoa butter or lecithin or anything else – the ingredient list is the essence of purism, with only 2 components: flavour cocoa mass and raw cane sugar. This is chocolate as it was meant to be.

Hans-Peter Rot: 10-Sep-2005

Posted: September 10, 2005 by
SCORES Score/10 Weight
Aroma: 9 10%
Look/snap: 8 5%
Taste: 9 35%
Melt: 9.5 5%
Length: 9 15%
Opinion: 9 30%
Total/100: 89.75 100%
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Cratered like the moon but obviously more appetizing, the chocolate is crudely molded but shines marvelously a deep brown color that’s difficult to extract a defining tint. Of more importance is the aroma, which is utterly fantastic. Tart cherries and a green curiosity such as olives define the scent, strong and potent as well with an alcoholic edge, resembling a chocolate martini (yum).

Almost as shocking as an ice cold bath, tart vodka and green tree branches jolt the palate, but this dies down as a pivotal chocolatiness envelopes the tongue and carries with it cherries and currants, then grapes, mildly acidic as well, adding just enough depth to the deep, dark, and probing chocolaty tones that could put any Forastero to shame.

Texture is creamy beyond belief, melting effortlessly in the mouth and sealing the deal on a chocolate that’s exceeded all expectations. Of course, though, when you first try this chocolate, you’ll definitely notice a sense of minimalist presentation in the flavor (especially in the beginning of the length), but you’ll quickly learn that this chocolate has been masterfully tamed and tempered to deliver the most optimal flavor. There are good things coming from the Dominican Republic, and this is certainly at the top of its class.



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