New Moon is a fine organic bar that’s a bit stuck on tradition and the idiosyncrasies of the market, but it also shows signs of gourmet appeal. It’s an intermediary approach, one that taps into two markets and creates something that should please fans of both.


Reviews

Alex Rast: 30-Dec-2005

Posted: December 30, 2005 by
SCORES Score/10 Weight
Aroma: 8 10%
Look/snap: 7 5%
Taste: 7.5 35%
Melt: 8.5 5%
Length: 8 15%
Opinion: 8 30%
Total/100: 78 100%
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A very passable organic chocolate with a few flaws – that could be fixed with a little work. Not your typical “”red-brown”" flavour of organic chocolate, and definitely lighter than most organics of a similar percentage. Some interesting flavour twists but also some harsh characteristics that are an unfortunate reminder, perhaps, of the organic chocolates from times past. This is a chocolate that was among the earlier of the new breed organics and certainly appears as a bright young upstart – but one which perhaps still can’t fully shake off a spotty past.

Like many organic chocolates this one has a very rustic look. Bubbling is pretty evident and the moulding isn’t the cleanest. A good sheen, however, indicates promise, so there’s room for optimism. Aroma is possibly the bar’s best feature, with a balance of cherry and coffee – an entertaining counterpoint of opposing aromas that works to revive and invigorate. There are some woody nuances, however, and this warns of danger, especially with the coffee and cherry. Might this bar be overwhelmingly harsh? We will see.

The flavour, as it turns out, opens quite weakly for a 74%, with the coffee prevailing, along with cocoa, but of a muted style. It’s like somewhat old cocoa mixed with a weak cup of coffee. However, this proves somewhat fortuitous, for a very pleasing almond emerges, that, had these characteristics been more forcefully asserted, would probably have vanished. Unfortunately, a pronounced bitterness tags along for the ride, a chiding presence that, while it can’t fully erase the positives, does its best to distract, like a pair of squabbling kids on a drive through the Alps. It’s surprising to see no fruity elements in the flavour mix – were those hidden under the bitter edge?

The bar is excellently creamy, and certain above-average in smoothness as well. In some ways this also seems to be a trend among newer organics – if nothing else, they’re determined not to be left behind on melt. If only Dagoba could eliminate the bitter qualities of this bar, the same could be said of taste as well: this is a chocolate which is already quite good in its own right and needs mere refinement. It could use just a bit more life, something slightly more vivid, and then it would be superb. Nontheless, if this is where organic is going, we can expect good things out of the trip to come.

Hans-Peter Rot: 20-Dec-2005

Posted: December 20, 2005 by
SCORES Score/10 Weight
Aroma: 7 10%
Look/snap: 7.5 5%
Taste: 8 35%
Melt: 6.5 5%
Length: 8 15%
Opinion: 8 30%
Total/100: 78 100%
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It’s amazing how a matte surface can detract from a bar’s physical appearance despite the fact that the bar appears to be molded very decently otherwise. Nonetheless, the color is again for Dagoba very dark, with this one in particular donning a burgundy-purple coat, as well as an aroma that’s equally dark. Molasses, cherries, tobacco, and raisins all show up to suggest a dark roast, so all in all, darkness is the defining trait of New Moon, an apt description if you think about it.

Without thinking, it’s obvious a darker roast was applied, as bitter coffee starts things off, leading to cherries and of course a ubiquitous darkness that adds an arresting depth of flavor. Figs, raisins, and a hit of clove add variety, consistent in strength, and overall similar to Amedei but not nearly as sophisticated or staggering, more like an imitation designer handbag starting to fall apart at the seams.

And similarly, you’d have no problem settling for an imitation until you can spring for the real McCoy, which again is the more elusive and pricey Amedei bar, but make no mistake, comparing Dagoba to Amedei isn’t flattery. New Moon is simply a fine organic bar that’s a bit stuck on tradition and the idiosyncrasies of the organic market, but it also shows signs of gourmet appeal. It’s an intermediary approach, one that taps into two markets and creates something that should please fans of both.



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