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DIY custom vacuum forming of chocolate molds
July 23, 2007
5:17 pm
drcrash
USA
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Forum Posts: 3
Member Since:
July 15, 2007
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I'm looking into making my own chocolate molds by vacuum forming food-grade PETG and/or polycarbonate sheets.

Does anybody here have experience with that?

I've found vacuum forming to be surprisingly easy, you can make your own vacuum former in an hour or two for about $40, using a kitchen oven & vacuum cleaner, but I've never made food molds that way.

I'm looking into the possibility of making customizable molds that way. For example, you could have a basic candy bar form, place some letters on it to spell out someone's name or slogan (and maybe an appropriate relief logo or ornament), then vacuum form PETG over that to make the chocolate mold. That would only take a few minutes per mold, and then you could mold custom chocolates right away.

It seems like a nice service for a chocolatier to offer---next-day client- or event-specific chocolates.

Anybody tried anything similar? Any thoughts?

July 24, 2007
4:04 am
seneca
USA
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May 22, 2005
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http://bittersweetcafe.blogspot.com http://www.bittersweetcafe.com
July 24, 2007
3:04 pm
deb
Calgary, Canada
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Forum Posts: 146
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May 29, 2005
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The mold making kits that Senaca has provided a link to, costs about $60 CAD so that would be about $55 US. It is called the SIL940 by Smooth-On. Doing molding this way can be costly. I have a kit and I am waiting for a special project that I can try it out on. I am thinking of using a Western Rodeo style beltbuckle to try it out on. I would be very interested in what drcrash comes up with interms of the plstic sheets. I have been consulting with a fabrication company and in our many conversations we have discussed this option. I am not sure what or where to source the food grade sheets of plastic etc.. So drcrash as you journey along it would be wonderful and very helpful if you could post your results.
Deb.

July 24, 2007
4:59 pm
drcrash
USA
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Forum Posts: 3
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July 15, 2007
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Yes, silicone is expensive, and food-grade silicone is even a little more expensive. Vacuum formed PETG molds are much, much cheaper.

(Especially since I'm thinking of situations where you need to produce a bunch of chocolates---say, one or two per person at a large event---so you need a bunch of molds to do it in reasonable time.)

The best place to get sheet plastics is usually a local plastics supplier, so that you don't have to pay shipping. Some have a $100 minimum order to keep the riffraff out, so you probably need to look up plastics suppliers in the yellow pages and call around. Try to find one with no minimum, or a low minimum, or who'll waive the minimum for "will call" orders (that you come in and pick up yourself).

A full 4 x 8 foot sheet of thin PETG should be in the low tens of dollars, and they'll roll it up so it'll fit in your car. (Be sure to ask for FOOD GRADE PETG. Other PETG may have various additives in it that are not good in food.) You can take it home and cut it yourself by scoring it with a razor knife or other very sharp knife and snapping it at the score.

(Actually, for thin PETG you can usually just cut it with scissors.)

You can cut a 4 x 8 foot sheet into 24 12" x 16" sheets, which is a convenient size for lots of stuff, and fits very comfortably in most home kitchen ovens. Those smaller sheets end up costing around a dollar each, and can have a couple of candy-bar molds formed into them, or a bunch of smaller molds.

If you just want to make one candy bar-(or belt buckle-)sized mold, and don't want to buy (or break open) an expensive silicone kit, you can get food-safe silicone putty in small quantities from a Hobby Lobby craft store.

They sell something called "Amazing Mold Putty" which is a two-part putty with about a three minute working time. It normally costs $20 for 2/3 lb., but if you wait for one of their regular coupon specials, you can get 40 percent off, so it's about $12, or $1 an ounce. Not bad for food-safe silicone, and it should be enough for a belt buckle mold or something comparable.

Check the Hobby Lobby web page for their weekly coupon. Every few weeks they have one for 40 percent off any one item in the store. You have to print out the coupon and take it in to the store to get the 40 percent off, but you can print out several and use one a day for a week, and get 7 things at the 60 percent price in a week. If there's a Hobby Lobby on your daily route, that can be a cool deal.

As I write this, on July 10 2007, they're running that deal. Here's the link to the coupon to print out:

http://www.hobbylobby.com/site.....coupon.cfm

Even if you're doing vacuum forming, that can be handy stuff to have around, for making intermediate molds.

You can also use alginate, which is cheaper, for temporary molds. (Alginate is like a super jello that you mix with water. Dentists use it for casting insides of people's mouths, and lifecasters use it for casting people's faces, body parts, etc.) You have to use it right away, because it shrinks as the water dries, but you could use it (or silicone) to make a few copies of a shape to vacuum-form molds over. (So that you could put, say, three belt-buckle molds in each vacuum-formed sheet.)

July 25, 2007
6:47 pm
drcrash
USA
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Forum Posts: 3
Member Since:
July 15, 2007
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Here's a movie of my simplest and cheapest vacuum former in operation:

[URL=http://s136.photobucket.com/albums/q176/drcrashpix/miscvacuumforming/?action=view&current=10c156de.flv][IMG]http://i136.photobucket.com/albums/q176/drcrashpix/miscvacuumforming/th_10c156de.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

(The YouTube version looks nicer, but I don't know how to embed it here: )

You can make that one for about $40 in an hour or two. (It's basically a board with a hole in it and a gasket made of weatherstripping, plus a couple of aluminum window screen frames.) For another $30 you can make a standalone oven for plastic up to 12 x 20 inches, using a two-burner hot plate and disposable aluminum pans. Both work great.

You can make a high-vacuum system to get better detail for thicker plastic (or more difficult-to-form plastic like polycarbonate) for under $50.

More info on this stuff---but nothing specific to food molds, yet---is on my Vacuum Former Plans web site, http://www.VacuumFormerPlans.com

DIY custom vacuum forming of chocolate molds | Equipment & supplies | Forum