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Claudio Corallo bars revisited
December 2, 2007
2:12 pm
Domenico
Budapest, Hungary
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December 12, 2005
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His chocolates have already been mentioned here and at that time not with an overall positive view.
Now I (to borrow the words from Alex Rast) HIGHLY RECOMMEND to taste them for everyone. I went through (I mean tasted) the entire range (ca. 8 varieties from the 100% to the ginger) and each and every piece is phenomenal. It's simply amazing what the nurture and care can bring out from his Forastero beans (albeit an old, low-yield Amelonado "clone"). It does not have as much finesse or elegance as a South-American Trinitario can show in the hands of a real expert, but it is ground-breaking, complex and now very smooth indeed. It is a lifetime experience.
Formerly there was a short thread here about whether Forasteros could pair up with Trinitarios (I intentionally not use the word Criollo given its rarity). After having tasted his chocolates, I am just more reinforced (the first good impact came with the tasting of the once-upon a time TAVA bar). So if you wish to experience something that is one of a kind, be sure you taste the recent batches.

December 2, 2007
6:20 pm
cacaocontent
St. Louis, MO, USA
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January 28, 2007
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My only exposure to the Corallo bars is from a recent batch, and I just wasn't impressed at all. The 75% is practically characterless, and the decision to put sugar crystals in the 80% I think was a poor one - the texture is distracting, and again, there isn't much flavor to begin with.

December 3, 2007
2:54 am
bradyb
New York, USA
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June 10, 2007
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I don't know how recent the batches were compared to what you had, but I purchased the 75% this past August. I really enjoyed it. I love that it came in a vacuum sealed package. Visually, it was exciting for me. Very rugged and crude in appearance. Except for the shiny packaging you might picture this chocolate as being produced right out on the island itself at one of the plantations. Texture was slightly rough. Flavors, to me seemed flowery, with an unrefined, mellow chocolate tone. Some coffee notes and a good aftertaste.

On the same day, I bought Pralus's Claudio Corallo 75% with nibs. Placing it side by side with Claudio Corallo's own version made it a very interesting comparison to me. Visually, Pralus's was the opposite. Pralus has a rugged brown paper packaging with raffia holding it together, but inside was a very finely finished bar. As compared to Claudio's own 3 thin, rugged tablets, Pralus has a narrow 1 inch (I didn't actually measure, but it is very thick) billet. Pralus's texture seemed somewhat dry due to the large and numerous rice sized nibs throughout the bar. It didn't seem to have the identifiable style of most Pralus. For me the flavor of this bar was just as impressive. I would recommend both versions.

December 3, 2007
8:09 pm
cioccolato
USA
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February 25, 2007
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With great anticipation I recently received a shipment of all Claudio Corallo products, and having read the story behind this bar you can't imagine how anxious I was to savor each item. I found the packaging to be very pleasant, somewhat spartan as every thing is basically in silver vacuum bags similar to what you would get a 1/4 lb of coffee, but appropriate for the theme of this chocolate. So cutting open the first bag I was greeted with a somewhat earthy almost musty smell. Not the usual cacao smell I am accustomed to smelling. So I quickly proceeded to the long anticipated tasting and found the chocolate to be very rustic, somewhat primitive in taste and composition. Although I did try all the samples, I honestly never finished any of them as I really did not enjoy them. Having indulged in fine chocolates from all over the world this chocolate did not stand up to my expectation, but feel it is probably reminiscent of of what chocolate may have tasted like in the early beginnings of chocolate making before we refined the process to the delightful item we have come to expect today.

December 4, 2007
12:32 am
Domenico
Budapest, Hungary
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December 12, 2005
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Strange how we have different views from the same thing. I daily eat Amedei and Valrhona weekly, while Cluizel and Domori kind of every 2 weeks so I can't tell I don't know what a smooth chocolate is. Nevertheless I did not feel Corallo's chocolate to be less refined or more gritty nor even more tannic. It is just a lot more...er...punk rock. Or to be more refined, like listening to the music of Bartok. Not all people can withstand that.
I liked the strong cocoa and earthy smell a lot. Don't forget CC chocolates do not have vanilla added and the beans are treated with an extreme care to unlock all the pleasant aromas while to prevent the formation of the unpleasant ones.I have had the chance to meet several dried fermented unroasted beans from all over the world amongst them were Corallo's and I think I have only had one sample that stood up to that level. The second thing that would make the chocolate smell different is that they are unconched in the traditional way. Given that conching was invented to ventilate away volatile acidic aromas and stabilise the emulsion, one can just wonder how CC succeeded to achieve such a chocolate that brings on the properties of a faultless prime material. For me it is indeed complex. In the strong coffee aftertaste we agree.
The packaging I never mind it does not add nor subtract anything from the chocolate's virtues. (Though I like both this very simple rustic style and even Godiva's packaging on the other end.)

December 4, 2007
5:34 am
Eshra
Southgate, USA
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February 14, 2006
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Has anyone tried his unhusked cacao beans? I had them and was not at all impressed... They were musty and without any high points...just undulating lows. His best offering, in my opinion, is his 70% bar with cacao liquor infused raisins. I also like his 80% bar with sugar crystals, despite the texture...just some really intense cocoa flavours there.

Sean

December 4, 2007
7:27 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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Eshra, I haven't tried Corallo's unhusked beans, but I've tried other unhusked and unroasted beans in the past and wasn't particularly impressed either. At that point, however, only half (presumably) of the bean's flavor has been developed through fermentation, so needless to say, expectations weren't that high to begin with. I imagine Corallo's product is based on novelty value rather than actual palatability.

December 5, 2007
12:14 am
Domenico
Budapest, Hungary
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December 12, 2005
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quote:


Originally posted by Montegrano

Eshra, I haven't tried Corallo's unhusked beans, but I've tried other unhusked and unroasted beans in the past and wasn't particularly impressed either. At that point, however, only half (presumably) of the bean's flavor has been developed through fermentation, so needless to say, expectations weren't that high to begin with. I imagine Corallo's product is based on novelty value rather than actual palatability.


December 12, 2007
1:35 pm
Casey
Minneapolis, USA
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November 30, 2007
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The cacao liquor infused raisins, one of a kind

The Chocolate Note http://chocolatenote.blogspot.com

Claudio Corallo bars revisited | Fine chocolate bar discussion | Forum