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domori's new bars
June 9, 2004
3:21 pm
Lone Ly
Oslo, Norway
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Ketchup??? Now we're talking experiments.

"Man cannot live by chocolate alone - but woman can." (Unknown)
June 9, 2004
10:12 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Well, since kethcup is already sweet, it complemented the spices quite nicely [;)]

June 20, 2004
3:20 am
blakej
San Francisco, USA
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A few more comments on the rest of the Domori 75g bars, my supply of which has sadly vanished.

- Granella: 60% with nibs. The bar itself has a pretty noticeable "sweet grape" flavor, similar to what I associate with Ocumare. The nibs are less annoying than most other nibby bars, which is to say they don't abrade the roof of my mouth (they're quite soft, almost chewy) and they don't overwhelm the flavor of the bar. They add a bit of dark coffee flavor which is actually pleasant.

- Carupano: 70%, Trinitario from their Hacienda San Jose in Venezuela. Rich flavors of eggs, butter, vanilla, and caramel.

- Madagascar: 70%, from (you guessed it) Madagascar. If ever you need an example of why origin makes at least as much difference as cocoa percentage, this and the Carupano will do it. Very strong tart wine-grape flavor, with some cherries and maybe pepper. Puckery and tannic, though pleasantly so.

Overall, three more bars that I'm really happy about. I've also fallen under the spell of the amazing Italian chocolatiers recently, and now that I'm basically out of both Amedei and Domori, I'll somehow have to adjust back to the real world. *sigh*

June 21, 2004
3:31 pm
alex_h
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thanks for the info, blake.
i've eyed granella before, but thought it might be too sweet for me.
carupano i've not heard of and madagascar i've tried, but couldn't get a good impression of. i might be getting another bar this weekend.

January 19, 2005
3:21 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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The most recent Domori Porcelana I ate tasted significantly different than the bars I first had. This batch has a distinct Granny Smith apple flavor, and the bread was practically absent. The strawberry was very mild, as was the butter. It's interesting how different two batches can be, and this is actually what I appreciate about these types of chocolatiers. Production is on such a small scale basis that batches might taste different, whereas the big wigs in the industry manufacture products with a consistent taste almost devoid of any real personality.

January 19, 2005
8:31 am
alex_h
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i agree, monte. yet when one batch tastes bad and another like ambrosia i find reliability suffers.
my last porcelana rectified previous bad experiences. tasted a bit of cherries and i realized why this bean is of such high repute.

January 28, 2005
11:21 pm
marioh
Bonn, Germany
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It’s really surprisingly how different the Domori bars are from lot to lot, I agree to what has been said. On the one hand I really like that philosophy. The beans are varying in aroma and quality and Domori gives this to their bars. They do not try to hide it by blending the beans with others like the big producers do to make their chocolates taste more or less the same way whenever you buy it. On the other hand it’s really frustrating when you get a chocolate, which is totally different from the one you had before.
I for example bought a bar of Peperoncino. It was really great. As the packaging says a really warm taste. Soon it was all used up and I had to buy a new one. As I tasted it I could not believe it. It was complete different. It tasted much more like the Chateau Line Chili. And I personally do not like that one really. It’s very good, but I liked the other one more.
It is obvious that these differences come from the really low production of Domori. They are roasting each sack of beans individually. As I see it, this says everything. This way of producing has really big advantages. You can process each kind of bean, as it is perfect for it. But you really recognise the chance of raw material.
All Porcelana bars I had until now where really perfect. I love it, and I cannot do without it! So do not make me nervous!
I just hope I haven’t only written aspects already told!

January 29, 2005
1:54 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Well, I wouldn't necessarily say that brands try to hide anything by blending, as bean blending is essentially the heart of each chocolate, with exception, of course, to single origins. Even Domori blends different beans. But I know what you're saying: the smaller brands don't produce in large batches with predominantly bulk beans as the larger companies do. As you imply, I think one factor is the small batch productivity that leads to such varying and unique flavors, coupled with differing crop yields each year. Effects of climate and environment are much more noticeable with smaller scale producers, as well.

January 29, 2005
9:38 am
marioh
Bonn, Germany
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I didn’t mean to say blending is a bad thing. There are great blends on the chocolate market (for example the Tavoletta bars from Amedei). But I think by blending you are able to compensate varying quality and differences in taste of single beans much better. You do not realise the differences in such a hard way as I experience it with Domori. Even that isn’t a bad think at all. But I just find it frustrating when you are getting a new bar and it isn’t that good than the last one (for your personal feeling, everyone loves other characteristics). But this is the character of Domori, I think. And to be honest, I love Domori just because it isn’t normal at all.

January 29, 2005
10:06 am
marioh
Bonn, Germany
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Just forgot one point. Finally most bars are blends. In some way even a Cru is made from different beans from different parts of the single area. But as I see it, most brands try to produce stabile versions of their bars, which do not vary with time. Chance seems to be a part of the factory program of Domori. Just look at the Blend No.1, which “officially” chances its three included varieties each year.

January 29, 2005
4:26 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Yeah, I know what you mean; perhaps we suffer from some sort of a language barrier, but I essentially said the same thing you just did. Blendning does indeed hide some inconsistenecies of other beans, whether or not they're bulk or flavor, but due to such conditions and factors we have discussed previously, the flavor still might be slightly different. Also, take into consideration the amount of one type of bean a certain manufacturer might not be able to have access to in one year's production of a certain chocolate. Chances are that the same year's batch will taste significantly different.

January 30, 2005
1:58 pm
legodude
Norway
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I think the small quality producers should try to be fair to their quality seeking customers and mark their chocolates with vintage or batch numbers. At least if they can not produce chocolate with some minimum of concistency. It is okay with some fluctuations, but if one bar is good and another is bad, it is not okay. With wine you are aware of the good and bad vintages and you can avoid spending lots of money on a bottle of overpriced wine.

"I`ve got lots of friends in San José. Do you know the way to San José?"
January 31, 2005
12:10 pm
alex_h
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good idea, lego! i hope gianluca franzoni is listening.

January 31, 2005
4:49 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
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Yeah, and some manufacturers do print lot numbers and even batch numbers on the packaging, but unfortunately, this practice is only limited to a few. However, one look at expiration dates might suggest date of manufacture. Plantations actually prints the date of manufacture above the expiration date, and Venchi lists lot number for all their products. Most of us know that Amedei does as well, but I think that Domori should be reading this right now hehe. My last Porcelana was definitely not on the same level of the previous batch.

February 3, 2005
2:10 pm
alex_h
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btw, mario, i just tried domori's pepperoncino bar and i must say: lovely! it really tastes like a milk chocolate and they got the right dosage of chili in it. i think this could be a new fave of mine :-)

February 4, 2005
8:16 am
marioh
Bonn, Germany
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You are right. I like all of the 75g bars (but I haven't tasted Granella yet). But I had the same experience with the Carupano yesterday. I bought a new one and it was differnent from the one before. It isn't that highly aromatic than the one before, but it has more of the fantastic Domori vaxy taste. So I would say both are great. Bying a new Domori bar seems to be tasting a new one. You never run out new Domori tastings (even though you might sometimes be disappointed).

February 15, 2005
9:39 am
alex_h
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yeah, the carupano i bought had that waxy taste as well. in the beginning it's almost candle-like.
btw, i had my first granella this weekend and was extremely disappointed. it's the worst bar i've had from domori. flat, no complexity, the chocolate flavor is dull and the nibs don't make up for any of it. a clear loss in my book. but i will at a later time give it another try to see whether this was an irregularity or just the way the bar is.

February 15, 2005
4:45 pm
marioh
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I bought a Granella bar last week. I’m very satisfied with it. For me it has a perfect balance. There are not too much or too big nibs in it. I find too much nibs bothersome. But here the mixture is very good. The chocolate can melt slowly and at the end you have a nice crunch. Just as it is with the 60% from the Hacienda San Jose Boxes. The chocolate itself is very good as well. It is very aromatic, lets say a good aromatic trinitario blend. I taste notes of almonds and some flowery and roasted aromas. I’m really happy with this lot. But let’s see what will come next…

February 16, 2005
11:57 am
alex_h
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i think i need to go and try it again before condemning it then. the 60% in san jose was much much better though. which san jose have you tried, mario?

February 17, 2005
12:03 pm
marioh
Bonn, Germany
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I have an Ocumare 67 box. And I’m very satisfied with it. All different bars are excellent. The 100% is the best I have ever enjoyed and the 80% really does not fell like an 80%. It was really hard to decide what to buy. I first thought about buying a Canoabo because I’m very curious about how it tastes. But finally I was not able to get a Canoabo box. But I’m still very interested in how it tastes. Have you tasted it alex? 2006 there will be a Guasare and Chuao box, right? I have heard fantastic comments to the qualities of Guasare.

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