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domori's new bars
February 17, 2005
12:52 pm
alex_h
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no, unfortunately i have not been able to get my hands on any canoabo. but i sure do want to try it.
i had a box of ocumare 67 as well. my favorite there was the 80%.
yes, i've heard about the guasare and chuao and i've read that guasare is supposed to be superior to porcelana in complexity.

February 17, 2005
2:46 pm
marioh
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Oh, I know that the Vintage in Cologne offered the Canoabo. I know because it is not that far away from me. But I do not know whether they have it anymore. I though a while about buying it, but decided not to do. I would really love to taste, but I do not love to spend 75 Euro for it. I just bought Ocumare 67 (which was less expensive (it’s quite funny how prices can vary, isn’t it?)) and do not want to spent that much money again (even though I though really hard about it). I think they offer it on their Homepage: http://www.weinseminare.de/pra.....n_2004.pdf
A few weeks ago I talked to Holger in’t Veld and he told me that the Canoabo was sold out very quickly and that it is really hard to get a box.

February 17, 2005
4:24 pm
alex_h
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:(
here the ocumare 61 and 67 each went for 78 euros (they didn't get the canoabo). holger in't veld was selling them each for 60!!!!
i could hit myself for not buying it then. grrrrr.

February 17, 2005
4:25 pm
alex_h
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thanks for the link btw.

February 17, 2005
6:33 pm
Polarbear
Tromsø, Norway
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quote:


Originally posted by alex_h

:(
here the ocumare 61 and 67 each went for 78 euros (they didn't get the canoabo). holger in't veld was selling them each for 60!!!!
i could hit myself for not buying it then. grrrrr.


One chocolate bar for 78 euro??? Or a big box?
I wouldn't buy a bar for 78 Norwegian kroner unless it was insanely great - and 1 € ~ 7 NOK.

***
My name is Polarbear and I am a chocoholic...

*** My name is Polarbear and I am a chocoholic...
February 17, 2005
11:35 pm
marioh
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Perhaps I misunderstood what you asked Polarbear, but we just talked about the Hacienda San Jose Box, which contains four types of bars and from each type five 25gr bars. All in all 500gr Domori chocolate.

I do not know whether this is the right topic to discuss the Hacienda San Jose here, or if it would be better to chance to the topic Hacienda San Jose already existing. But I will just make it here.
For me it is really difficult to decide which chocolate is the best. I just think there are at least four different groups of pure chocolate (meaning without any added flavour or anything like that) that are really hard to compare, perhaps even impossible. They are: White chocolate, milk chocolate, dark chocolate and chocolate without any added sugar. I personally like any group (for example the white and milk from Amedei). But you cannot compare a 100% with a 70% (as I see it). Those are totally different chocolates. The aromas and textures are completely different. Added sugars always support the aromas. For me the aromas of Ocumare 70% are different than from Ocumare 100%. Nevertheless both are great. Of course I have my favourites as well. And of course you are right, that the 80% the really fantastic. But the added salt and fructose supports notes of Ocumare 67 with are not so evident in the other bars (as it is conceived). As I see it the 100% bars are a class of their own and can only be compared with other 100%. Now only the 60% and 70% are missing. The 70% is more or less Puertofino. It is great as all Chateau bars are. The 60% is very good as well. As I just argue before (perfect amount of added nibs and a perfect smoothness). So I do not know with bar I should call the best from the Hacienda box. But I would perhaps take the 60% with nibs (but this can chance with the next tasting…).
Finally you always have your favourites, as anyone has. But sometimes I think I should not try to compare chocolates that are not really comparable (but of course I do (and that’s just taking us to the topic of comparing for example Domori to chocolates from the next supermarket...).

February 18, 2005
8:00 am
Polarbear
Tromsø, Norway
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quote:


Originally posted by marioh

Perhaps I misunderstood what you asked Polarbear, but we just talked about the Hacienda San Jose Box, which contains four types of bars and from each type five 25gr bars. All in all 500gr Domori chocolate.


No, you didn't misunderstand, I did! [:D] But € 78 for 500 g choc is still awfully expensive.

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My name is Polarbear and I am a chocoholic...

*** My name is Polarbear and I am a chocoholic...
February 18, 2005
9:16 am
alex_h
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good point, mario. my original reason for buying the box was to try the 100%. the other three weren't of any great interest to me. when i tried them that changed. as you say, the 70% is pretty much puertofino, but the 60 and 80% really stand out. i like them both much, but since i like salt in my chocolate i lean towards the 80%.

you are right, polar, it is an awful lot of money. for the same amount of chateau domori i would normally pay 66 euros. but i'm not buying it every day so...
lone bought a box in berlin (for 60 euros) and shared it with lego and i, which was very nice of her and it saved us all some money.

February 18, 2005
11:09 am
marioh
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You are right. It is not really cheap at all. But it is really worth it. You have to see that this box contains 20 Domori Chateau bars which are not available in the normal bar format (apart from the 70%). And this box is fantastic. All made of one single variety (just look http://www.domori.com, http://www.chocosphere.com to see pictures and description). Each of these bars would be at least 3 €. But you have an 80% and a 100%. Just look at the Chateau bars. The Puertomar has 75% and Puertofino has 70%. Often you see, that the two bars have a different price. Puertomar is more expensive. Obviously (just my personal opinion) because of the higher cacao-content (Porcelana might be more expensive because it is rarer). If you are lucky you can buy the boxes for less than 78€ (just around 60€). If you calculate what I said before, than the price is quite ok. Of course this might be a justification why I spend so much money for chocolate, but as I see it we are all fanatics when it comes to chocolate. And I love Domori and I’m just willing to pay it. I know many people who would just say that I’m totally crazy and perhaps they are right. But that does not hold me back anyway. And furthermore you just buy such a box once. Of course you are all right. Normally you buy one or two Chateau bars. Not 20. For me it was a single “adventure”, and I do not regret it. Perhaps it is really best to find people to share these boxes with, but for this you have to find people who are just as curies about chocolate as you are yourself.

February 18, 2005
12:48 pm
alex_h
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a rare thing those people you can share these with. it was actually quite funny though. lone and i were sending chocolate back and forth between germany and norway. little brown 25g squares wrapped in aluminum foil. i wonder what the sniffer dogs said to that!
but it always arrived safely, no bits missing.

February 18, 2005
1:06 pm
marioh
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Sometimes I feel that getting hold of chocolate has really some astonishing similarities to drug-related crime. [}:)] But luckily it is all legal.[;)]

February 18, 2005
2:58 pm
legodude
Norway
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It is a paradox. It is much easyer to buy drugs, than Domori! You can get drugs in even small towns of Norway, but for my "doze" of Domori I must go to London, Berlin or Paris. [B)]

"I`ve got lots of friends in San José. Do you know the way to San José?"

"I`ve got lots of friends in San José. Do you know the way to San José?"
February 24, 2005
1:28 am
Hans-Peter Rot
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Well, chocolate was actually banned by the church several years ago, so at one point it was illegal.

February 24, 2005
8:39 pm
alex_h
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when was this? and what's this church thing you speak of? ;)

March 4, 2005
12:42 am
Hans-Peter Rot
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Alex, are you asking in seriousness, or are you kidding? Because if you're serious, I can provide some information.

March 4, 2005
9:02 am
alex_h
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:-D
well, i know what a (or the) church is, but didn't know about any ban.

March 4, 2005
1:43 pm
legodude
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But chocolate was also allowed as one of few foods in the Lent by the church, as it was considered a drink. Which it in fact was.

"I`ve got lots of friends in San José. Do you know the way to San José?"
March 4, 2005
4:56 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
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Therein lies part of the debate. Chocolate was also known for its ability to satisfy hunger and for its nutritional properties as well. It's been argued on both sides that chocolate did not break the fast because it was considered a drink and did not contain dairy or eggs, but then several theologians have argued that it did break the fast due to its nourishing properties. Part of the ongoing debates was also due to chocolate sipping DURING services. One example of a ban on chocolate: In Chiapas, Don Bernard de Salazar (bishop of San Cristobal de la Cazas), banned chocolate, threatening excommunication if anyone was caught drinking it. Ironically, he died shortly thereafter due to poisoned hot chocolate....

Anyway, in 1662, Pope Alexander VII decided to end the bickering, and claimed that hot chocolate did not break the fast.

March 7, 2005
10:21 am
alex_h
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oh, i thought you meant in more recent history.

March 10, 2005
6:48 am
Hans-Peter Rot
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No, but I find it interesting how people always "give up" chocolate for Lent, when in fact, they never were really eating "pure" chocolate to begin with. They've obviously mistaken chocolate for sugar-laden candy simply masquerading as "chocolate." So, in a sense, they didn't give up chocolate at all. There are always loopholes and ways around things [:D]

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