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Giving up chocolate
October 19, 2005
4:57 pm
Nigel
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Forum Posts: 3
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October 19, 2005
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Hello

I’m looking for a chocoholic who would be prepared to give up chocolate as part of a project I’m working on.

For more details please email me at nigelalred@btinternet.com

Cheers

October 19, 2005
5:34 pm
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 614
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July 31, 2006
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… I see tumbleweed drifting across the the plain while a cold wind blows … will anyone here break the silence?

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
October 19, 2005
7:32 pm
Masur
Stockholm, Sweden
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Forum Posts: 592
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August 6, 2006
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I’m trying to survive a real life in a real world with help from real chocolate.

Would I call myself a chocoholic if offered £1.000? Definitely!!

Would I give up chooclate if offered £1.000.000? Definitely maybe!!

“Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos” (Maricel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
October 19, 2005
11:51 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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March 17, 2005
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For how long? This thread actually made me go order some more chocolate. Will admit been chocoholic, chocolate addict, chocolate obssesive (only dark one though – truly chocolate, not sugar) for free any time.

October 20, 2005
10:19 am
stevec
London, United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 27
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August 7, 2006
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Tell us all more about this project of yours Nigel.

What you are proposing probably sounds like some sort of masochistic torture to most of the members of this forum. But it does raise some interesting questions about why we enjoy our chocolate, what it means to us and why we would ever consider abstaining from its pleasure.

I wonder what we would rather give up instead?

What incentive are you providing to the unfortunate sap who takes up your challenge.

firepants

firepants
October 20, 2005
10:20 am
stevec
London, United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 27
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August 7, 2006
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By the way Nigel, have you read the article on chocolate addiction in the ‘Pod’ section of the website, you’ll find it on the bottom of the page.

firepants

firepants
October 24, 2005
11:11 am
Nigel
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Forum Posts: 3
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October 19, 2005
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Hello again

Basically the project is for a segment in a TV series and we want to find out more about what chocolate means to people, and also why some people who describe themselves as chocoholics have a desire to cut down on their chocolate intake.

So is chocolate an imortant part of your life? How much do you eat during an average week? Ultimately would you want to cut down or stop eating chocolate altogether in the pursuit of a healthier diet? How long do you think you could last without chocolate if you did give up?

Nigel

October 24, 2005
12:10 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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March 17, 2005
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Yes, it’s important. About 400gr per week. And it IS a healthy diet. Is’t on average above 75%. Do not feel there is any credible reason to give it up.

October 24, 2005
1:06 pm
Masur
Stockholm, Sweden
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August 6, 2006
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An average week 350g real chocolate with around 72% cocoa and low glycaemic index.

“Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos” (Maricel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
October 24, 2005
5:14 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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10

I think there’s also a huge psychological role here too. Man is a creature of habit, and as they say, “old habits are hard to break.” Once you start any sort of routine and maintain it for a certain period of time, your body becomes adjusted to it. And then once you break this regimen, the difference is that much more noticeable, and the change is particularly hard to adjust to. For example, set your alarm clock for 6am every morning for two weeks, then suddenly stop this and see what time you wake up the next morning. Chances are good that you’ll wake up at 6am even without the alarm.

I don’t think I have a physical addiction to chocolate because I can survive equally as well without it. It’s just one of my many interests, and I don’t like to limit my scope to just a few areas. I still like to enjoy my chocolate, so I try to keep consumption low. If I taste too much, then all the fun is removed, and then I get bored with it. So by limiting myself, I find great pleasure in it every day. Besides, it’s not so special anymore if it becomes a hefty part of a routine diet, now does it? For example, we enjoy oranges, apples, etc. year-round because they are imported from various growing regions that can support these crops. But what if they were only available in the spring and summer? Would you find more pleasure in these foods then, since they would not be a dietary staple year round? Probably, because this is the only time that you can enjoy them, and to not indulge yourself at this time would mean another year must pass before you can do so. So, in short, it’s not the time frame that’s important but the principle of the matter: your body takes more pleasure in things that are in limited supply, whereas items that are abundant get placed to the back burner, sort of. I don’t think there’s an addiction, but more of a body clock that is ticking away, and when a certain time arrives, your body rings and alerts you that it is finally time to enjoy a certain item.

Despite all the health benefits that people boast, these facts usually relate to 100g, which is more than what the average person consumes in one day, and as you can see, this is also more than what even the most dedicated fans here consume. And when these facts are applied cocoa powder, the amount is often 1oz, which is 28g, and in baking terms it’s 2 tablespoons. Keep in mind that this is pure cocoa particles with minimal cocoa butter, so this is a very concentrated form of chocolate and probably more healthy than actual chocolate that still has the cocoa butter.

October 25, 2005
3:03 pm
Nigel
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October 19, 2005
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11

Cheers for your reply Montegrano.

It was interesting reading what you had to say.

Nigel

October 25, 2005
3:17 pm
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 614
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July 31, 2006
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12

I only know of a few people who have had allergic reactions to chocolate, or migraine, and have therefore tried to limit their intake. For chocolate over 70%, there’s no real reason to feel guilty or limit consumption. To make such strong chocolate palatable, better beans and treatment are needed – which is why we all prefer the artisanal, fine chocolate discussed on this site.

Now Monte, let’s be honest – hands up all those members who DO consume 100g per day!

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
October 25, 2005
3:24 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
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13

Chocolates does have some chemicals (e.g. caffeine and phenylethylamine) that constrict the blood vessels and therefore cause headaches. Some people might be able to drink coffee but not eat chocolate due to sensitivities to phenylethylamine, whereas some people might be able to enjoy chocolate and not coffee. Cool, huh?

Well, Martin, I have been known to consume well over 100g in one day, but this is not on a daily basis! Just a rare occasion do I indulge in this, but I try to limit myself to 50g or so a day…key work: try [;)]

December 9, 2005
10:10 pm
ducky
Portland, USA
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December 3, 2005
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14

Give it up as a part of a healthier diet? Whaaaa? In the book Feel Good Naked, Laurie Redmond claims to have a very healthy diet plan and it includes one piece of chocolate daily (to be eaten naked interestly enough). I don’t believe in giving it up to be “healthier”.

December 10, 2005
4:12 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Forum Posts: 1462
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August 1, 2006
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15

Well, it’s “unhealthy” to give up anything because deprivation often leads to binging later on, and then you’ll feel guilty…but satisfied. That could be avoided simply by enjoying those comfort foods every now and then, in moderation of course. Moderation and a well balanced diet are the keys to good health.