3 Jan 2014: The Forum is currently in read-only made while we update to a new version of the Seventy% website and forum.

The forum will be back with a faster, simplified and up to date website in the next two months.

Please consider registering
guest

Log In

Lost password?
Advanced Search:

— Forum Scope —



— Match —



— Forum Options —




Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

The forums are currently locked and only available for read only access
Topic RSS
Lindt Excellence, Madagascar and Ecuador
November 22, 2006
10:49 pm
ChemicalMachine
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 110
Member Since:
June 5, 2005
Offline

Today I noticed Lindt Excellence Madagascar 65% and Ecuador 75%. I bought two 100g bars of each, as I have not tried a new chocolate in months.

I first tried the Ecuador 75%. It says that it uses Arriba cocoa. It tasted simple, with a moderately strong basic chocolate flavor predominating. I did not notice any acidity (I tend to appreciate some of the acidic flavors in the basic 70% Lindt bar).

It did not impress me at all, but I figured that Arriba is supposed to be simple, so I was not too displeased. I grouped it with Santader as a simple yet satisfying chocolate, although the Santader has more character with its taste of coffee.

Then I looked at the ingredients. One of them is “NATURAL FLAVORING (PRUNE)”. I was quite suprised. Nothing else on the package suggests that anything besides normal indgredients would be included. Knowing that it included prunes, I tasted it again, and detected a sweet prune liek taste and odor which I attributed to the prunes. It is interesting that I did not notice this taste before I knew to look for it.

Anyway, I was not happy at this point. Why prunes? Perhaps this simple tasting chocolate tasted too simple and they tried to compensate by sneaking in some fruit flavor? Interestingly, it has no vanilla.

I then moved on to the Madagascar. It says that it uses Sambirano cocoa. This bar has vanilla instead of prune. [;)] Anyway, at 65%, I was expecting for this bar to taste similar to Guittard’s Ambanja which is at the same percentage and also claims to use Sambirano beans. The Guittard Ambanja is one of my favorite bars, I really like the blueberry flavor, and everything else about it.

Anway, I tried it. The choclate flavor was fairly weak. Almost like a milk chocolate. There are some weak acidic flavors, which I initially described as herbal, and then wondered if mint might be a better description. I detect a slight taste of acidic blueberry and choclate in the finish, but perhaps only because I was searching for the blueberry.

I do notice a slight similarity to the Guittard, but I think that the Guittard is much better.

Now, I feel disappointed by both bars. I find the basic Lindt 70% to be stronger in chocolate flavor than both of the “Excellence Origins” bars, and I also find the basic 70% Lindt to be more interesting with its moderatetly intense acidic flavors.

Are these recent additions to Lindt’s line of chocolate? I noticed that neither is in the chocopaedia. Has anyone else tried these yet?

I noticed that these bars state that they were produced in Switzerland, while all of the other bars by Lindt that I have had said that they were made in France. Does Lindt produce better chocolate in France than in Switzerland?

November 23, 2006
10:38 pm
Domenico
Budapest, Hungary
Member
Forum Posts: 81
Member Since:
December 12, 2005
Offline

Take a look the label of Ghana from the same series. Last time I saw the aroma they were adding was pepper. I don’t even dare to think what they put into their Cuba bar…

November 26, 2006
2:46 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline

quote:


Originally posted by ChemicalMachine

Today I noticed Lindt Excellence Madagascar 65% and Ecuador 75%. …
I first tried the Ecuador 75%. It says that it uses Arriba cocoa. It tasted simple, with a moderately strong basic chocolate flavor predominating. I did not notice any acidity (I tend to appreciate some of the acidic flavors in the basic 70% Lindt bar).

It did not impress me at all, but I figured that Arriba is supposed to be simple, so I was not too displeased….

Then I looked at the ingredients. One of them is “NATURAL FLAVORING (PRUNE)”. I was quite suprised. … It is interesting that I did not notice this taste before I knew to look for it.

I then moved on to the Madagascar. It says that it uses Sambirano cocoa. This bar has vanilla instead of prune. [;)] Anyway, at 65%, I was expecting for this bar to taste similar to Guittard’s Ambanja which is at the same percentage and also claims to use Sambirano beans. The Guittard Ambanja is one of my favorite bars, I really like the blueberry flavor, and everything else about it.

Anway, I tried it. The choclate flavor was fairly weak. Almost like a milk chocolate. There are some weak acidic flavors, which I initially described as herbal, and then wondered if mint might be a better description. I detect a slight taste of acidic blueberry and choclate in the finish, but perhaps only because I was searching for the blueberry.

I do notice a slight similarity to the Guittard, but I think that the Guittard is much better.

… I also find the basic 70% Lindt to be more interesting with its moderatetly intense acidic flavors.

Are these recent additions to Lindt’s line of chocolate? I noticed that neither is in the chocopaedia. Has anyone else tried these yet?


Prune?! Bizarre! I can’t remember that, though. IIRC, my bar of the Ecuador didn’t have any funny ingredients. Somehow though I wonder if there wasn’t some sort of odd labelling mix-up.

The Lindt Ecuador 75% I tried was actually quite good. It had the right blackberry/brown sugar highlights and a profile of strong vanilla – so that in the middle it tasted a lot like a chocolate biscuit. The only issues were in the finish which was flat and woody. It would be somewhere in the mid 8′s in overall score. Commendable, although not the best Ecuador available. To the best of my recollection, the bar had Made in France, though.

Meanwhile the Lindt Madagascar 65% was outstanding. I’ve written up a review for Chocopaedia which awaits only a graphic image of the bar. In any case, it was textbook Madagascar, with floral and vanilla hints in the aroma along with the signature cinnamon nose, and the flavour started out with that blueberriness you note in the Guittard before moving to cinnamon/citrus, the archetypal Madagascar flavour, and ending with a hint of nuts and chocolate. I couldn’t find fault with it – even the texture was exemplary. I gave it an 8.925. The only Madagascar that is better is Amedei’s. I certainly give it the nod over Guittard because it exhibits that citrus characteristic which again is the trademark of Madagascar beans. The Guittard lacks this, and although a fine chocolate by any standard, doesn’t quite reveal the essence of the origin.

As for it tasting mild, yes, Madagascar Sambirano is a mild chocolate in general. Virtually all chocolates emanating from here are that way – and Amedei leads the way with a chocolate that is the essence of delicacy.

However, it’s easy to identify why you didn’t like either of these 2 chocolates: as you say, they’re not particularly acidic. That is a style preference, somewhat modulated by bean origin. You would almost certainly, for instance, not like Ocumare or Maracaibo chocolates because they have a noticeable lack of acidity. Nor would you be fond of the dark roasters like Pralus whose roast checks acidity brutally.

What you would most probably gravitate towards is manufacturers who go for a strongly fruity style – e.g. Valrhona or Scharffen Berger, combined with a bean such as Sur Del Lago. If I were to nominate a top 3 for you to try, they would be, first to third, Amedei Trinidad, Varhona Palmira, Domori Carupano.

And as for why you didn’t notice any prune flavour before seeing it on the ingredient label, well, that’s a great example of the power of suggestive priming. There have been numerous behavioural studies that show that when you’re suggested to look for something you tend to find it even if it isn’t noticeably there. I once attended a lecture which gave a spectacular example of that. They played “Stairway to Heaven” backwards without telling you what they were playing or giving you any hints. It sounded like nothing at all – more or less random noise. Then they told you the song, and also gave you the “backwards lyrics” that they suggested were in there. A second playing and sure enough – it sounded almost crystal clear. This is one reason, BTW, not to look at tasting notes or ingredient lists before taste-testing a new bar – because again it can bias you towards finding flavour components you wouldn’t otherwise detect.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
November 26, 2006
9:47 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 256
Member Since:
July 5, 2006
Offline

Hum…I actually didn’t like the Madagascar from Lindt at all…I guess this is a good example of different palates and preferences. I love the Guittard Madagascar but when I tried Lindts I hated it. I thought it has way to much fat in it(for my preference) and I didn’t taste the natural magascar flavors that I usually pick up. Maybe this is one of those palate differences between American and European? Maybe? Either way I like Guittards Madagascar. I think Guittards products set themselves up for American Palates and I think they do a good job of it.

-Robert
http://www.chocolateguild.com
http://www.chocolatiernoel.com

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
November 26, 2006
11:51 pm
ChemicalMachine
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 110
Member Since:
June 5, 2005
Offline

quote:


Originally posted by Alex_Rast

Somehow though I wonder if there wasn’t some sort of odd labelling mix-up.

As for it tasting mild, yes, Madagascar Sambirano is a mild chocolate in general. Virtually all chocolates emanating from here are that way – and Amedei leads the way with a chocolate that is the essence of delicacy.

However, it’s easy to identify why you didn’t like either of these 2 chocolates: as you say, they’re not particularly acidic. That is a style preference, somewhat modulated by bean origin. You would almost certainly, for instance, not like Ocumare or Maracaibo chocolates because they have a noticeable lack of acidity. Nor would you be fond of the dark roasters like Pralus whose roast checks acidity brutally.

What you would most probably gravitate towards is manufacturers who go for a strongly fruity style – e.g. Valrhona or Scharffen Berger, combined with a bean such as Sur Del Lago.


Domenico saw pepper on the label of the Gahna, so if these bars are unflavoured, then they screwed up the labels on more than one member of their Origins line.

The only Pralus bar that I have tried, the Indonesie, I liked, but I remembered it being noticeably acidic. So far, I have not liked any Scharffen Berger bar; I thought that they tasted astringent. As for Valrhona, I have liked everything by them (Guanaja, Caraibe, Ampamakia, Le Noir Amer 71%) that I have tried, except for the Le Noir Amer 85%.

I tried the Lindt Madagascar and Ecuador again today. The Madagascar tasted better today, perhaps because I had not already tasted a higher percentage bar. Today, I thought that the initial taste was strongly dominated by the vanilla, in addition to the herbal notes and the chocolate flavor. Latter I tasted a slightly acidic flavor. Yesterday I called this blueberry, but today I noticed that this flavor is slightly different form the blueberry in the finish. Perhaps it is the citrus which you taste. Again, I taste blueberry in the finish, which I find pleasurable.

I still prefer the Guittard, for which I have no complaints. I suspect that the Lindt Madagascar would be better with less cocoa butter, less vanilla, and more chocolate, for I still find the flavors to be relatively weak and the consistency to be imperfect.

Perhaps I was too negative with the Lindt Madagascar earlier. Both of the Lindt origin bars are free of bitterness or any offensive flavors; they simply don’t excite me.

Today, I tasted vanilla in the Ecuador; it was likely still on my tongue from the Madagascar. Other than that, my impression is the same. There is nothing offensive (other than the philosophical objection to the prunes), but nothing exciting. I would prefer a bar of Santader or El Rey (neither of which are very acidic).

Perhaps Lindt does better with harsher beans. The 70% and 85% or both bitter, but they are manageable and to me more interesting than either of these two origin bars.

Has anyone tried the Cuba? It probably will not ever be available here in the US due to our government’s policies concerning Cuba.

November 27, 2006
12:04 am
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 614
Member Since:
July 31, 2006
Offline

We just featured Pralus Cuba in the November 2006 Connoisseurs Club edition, and featured a side by side comparison with Lindt Cuba and Cacao Barry Cuba. The Lindt is only 55%, which seems a crazy marketing idea because it’s far too sweet. It could well be the best of the Lindt origins – I find the Ecuador poor and Madagascar unpalatable. The low percentage could be masking defects though.

Interestingly the Barry Cuba is superior to the Callebaut origins – it almost lacks the typical Callebaut ‘candy’ note, so Cuba seems the best from everyone.

Stepping up from the Lindt, to the Barry to Pralus was an interesting experience as the flavours gradually opened up, with a wine note really exhibiting itself by the time you get to the Pralus Cuba. It’s not the best Pralus, but they’ve made a good job of the beans.

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
November 27, 2006
10:18 am
Domenico
Budapest, Hungary
Member
Forum Posts: 81
Member Since:
December 12, 2005
Offline

I shortly would like to add that when I tasted Christian Constant’s Cuba the marked ‘wine’ ressemblance was indeed present there, too. Even if CC has a marked tendency to the acidic tastes (Try his 100%, tastes like sour grapes with lemon in a superb consistency).
So we did a nice journey from Madagascar to Cuba, didn’t we? :)

December 3, 2006
11:31 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline

quote:


Originally posted by ChemicalMachine

quote:


Originally posted by Alex_Rast

Somehow though I wonder if there wasn’t some sort of odd labelling mix-up.
<deletia>


Domenico saw pepper on the label of the Gahna, so if these bars are unflavoured, then they screwed up the labels on more than one member of their Origins line.


Which isn’t impossible – or even that somehow something got lost in translation on the way to the printer. Still, very, very odd.

quote:


The only Pralus bar that I have tried, the Indonesie, I liked, but I remembered it being noticeably acidic. So far, I have not liked any Scharffen Berger bar; I thought that they tasted astringent. As for Valrhona, I have liked everything by them (Guanaja, Caraibe, Ampamakia, Le Noir Amer 71%) that I have tried, except for the Le Noir Amer 85%.


Definitely suggests fruity preference, but not absolutely extreme. Indonesie is among the more acidic of the Pralus line, indeed. Definitely give Amedei Trinidad a try. Unsurprising, then, that you like Santander – the mild fruitiness of Colombia Nacional is in the right flavour territory, although like you I would say it’s simple – more relaxing, rather than truly complex and exciting. The best Colombia, btw, is clearly Guittard’s Chucuri. Another very interesting chocolate to look into, if you can afford it, is Felchlin’s Cru Sauvage. I found it lived up to the hype and stiff pricing with a chocolate that was delicate and subtle, with strawberry and chocolatey notes throughout. Whether it’s really “wild” is something you can argue about if you want, but it’s rather beside the point IMHO – this is just terrific chocolate. Does anyone have a nice face-on bitmap of the Cru Sauvage package? I have a review waiting to go on-line as soon as an image is available.

quote:



Has anyone tried the Cuba? It probably will not ever be available here in the US due to our government’s policies concerning Cuba.


Cuba is very mild and strongly fruity – somewhat reminiscent of the sweeter end of the Santander line. The principal flavour here is cherries. Overlain on that is a strong brown sugar twang. As a basic component you’d probably like the cherry and as an overall chocolate it might not seem objectionable, but yes, it’s very sweet and not particularly intense. Nothing earth-shaking here, perhaps somewhat above average for a mass manufacturer.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
December 9, 2006
9:49 pm
ChemicalMachine
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 110
Member Since:
June 5, 2005
Offline

You mention Guittard’s Chucuri, which is one of my favorites.

As for my preferences, over the past few days I have been tasting a lot of new chocolates, and I am trying to find patterns.

I tried a second Pralus bar, the Venezuela. I like the flavors of the chocolate a lot, but I was suprised by the packaging. The Indonesie that I had last summer was packaged in an interesting clear plastic pouch. This bar was wrapped with only a single piece of paper (Is this sufficient? Most brands package with a second layer of foil, wax paper, or plastic.).

I tried Michel Cluizel’s Los Ancones and Noir de Cacao 72%. Despite the high opinion others here have of these bars, I was not impressed by eitherr. I think that the flavors evolve too slowly and are not assertive enough. Is this obervation consistent with Michel Cluizel’s style?

I also tried Domori’s Carenero Superior and Chacao Absolute. I found both of these bars interesting, as the flavors are quite assesrtive. I say interesting, as I did not find either particularly pleasant; I am happy that I have tried these bars, but will not buy another of either.

I tried Bonnat’s Puerto Cabello and Hacienda El Rosario. Both are now among my favorite bars. These bars feature a strong chocolate flavor, but the chocolate flavor does not overpower the pleasent secondary flavors. IMO these bars have a dessert like nature, perhaps due to the pasta like flavor or fudge like consistency; I find that they taste great in the evening, but much less so in the morning.

I also tried Valrhona Araguani. I found that it tasted as the notes on the bar suggest it should. I have mixed feelings on this bar. I found it pleasant, but less so than the Caraibe. I question why Valrhona used brown sugar?

I think that I will give up on Michel Cluizel, but I see potential in the assertiveness of Domori. Any suggestions in addition to Carupano for bars from Domori which I should try? I like Guittard’s Sur Del Lago; is Domori’s Sur Del Lago better?

December 9, 2006
11:20 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 256
Member Since:
July 5, 2006
Offline
10

I enjoyed Guittards Sur Del Lago(Venezuela)…I actually classified(for my palate) a nutty taste to the chocolate…I actually enjoyed it a lot…what did you think of it?

Robert
http://www.chocolateguild.com

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
December 10, 2006
8:49 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline
11

quote:


Originally posted by ChemicalMachine

I tried Michel Cluizel’s Los Ancones and Noir de Cacao 72%. Despite the high opinion others here have of these bars, I was not impressed by eitherr. I think that the flavors evolve too slowly and are not assertive enough. Is this obervation consistent with Michel Cluizel’s style?


Not really – and especially not Los Ancones which is a VERY assertive bar. But more on that below.

quote:


I also tried Domori’s Carenero Superior and Chacao Absolute. I found both of these bars interesting, as the flavors are quite assesrtive.

I tried Bonnat’s Puerto Cabello and Hacienda El Rosario. Both are now among my favorite bars. These bars feature a strong chocolate flavor, but the chocolate flavor does not overpower the pleasent secondary flavors. …

I also tried Valrhona Araguani. I found that it tasted as the notes on the bar suggest it should. I have mixed feelings on this bar. I found it pleasant, but less so than the Caraibe. …


All these tasting notes indicate to me that you *define* assertive as acidity. A bar with low acidity is, to you, simply not assertive. That’s a different concept of what assertiveness means than mine, which is about overall flavour intensity in any component, not about the specific nature. To say that assertiveness = acidity says that your definition is not about the simple intensity as such but about the “attack”, that is, the rate of change in intensity. So if a bar quickly spikes to high intensity that’s what you think of as assertive and if it rather builds slowly over time to you that’s not especially assertive. Makes sense, then, that you’d like fruity bars because fruity notes have that strong spiking characteristic.

quote:


I think that I will give up on Michel Cluizel,


Probably a good idea because his style favours slow buildup of intensity over an immediate spike.

quote:


but I see potential in the assertiveness of Domori. Any suggestions in addition to Carupano for bars from Domori which I should try? I like Guittard’s Sur Del Lago; is Domori’s Sur Del Lago better?


Also try Puertofino which has an extreme spiking character. Domori Sur Del Lago isn’t, I think, any better than Guittard’s, but neither is it any worse.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
December 10, 2006
10:11 pm
ChemicalMachine
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 110
Member Since:
June 5, 2005
Offline
12

I think that you are correct. I define assertiveness as a combination of intensity and rate of change, but perhaps I am inconsistent in applying this definition. I often find coffee or nutty notes intense, yet not acidic. Maybe it is only the lighter flavors which need to be acidic for me to define them as intense.

Is rapid evolution of flavor not considered as a positive factor in objective reviews? Like a tree growing slowly, slow changes go unnoticed in the absence of conscious thought.

Something about Los Ancones reminds me of Lindt Excellence Madagascar. Perhaps those who love Los Ancones will like Lindt Madagascar more than I do.

December 13, 2006
12:00 am
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline
13

quote:


Originally posted by ChemicalMachine

I think that you are correct. I define assertiveness as a combination of intensity and rate of change, but perhaps I am inconsistent in applying this definition. I often find coffee or nutty notes intense, yet not acidic….


There’s no reason a coffee/nutty flavour can’t have a pronounced spiking character, so that’s not yet inconsistent. Acidity isn’t the only way to fast rates of change. However, where acidity is high, high rates of flavour change are almost inevitable. So that’s why perhaps overall that’s more satisfying to you as a general rule.

quote:


Is rapid evolution of flavor not considered as a positive factor in objective reviews?


The positive is a large number of components, not how rapidly they change. Rapidity of change can be either a positive or a negative – it depends upon context. For instance, a rapidly oscillating, “chaotic” flavour has a high rate of change but is not necessarily pleasant; instead, it seems jarring and poorly balanced. That kind of flavour is going to be bitter, probably in the extreme. A flavour with a slow modulation but which continues to release new subtleties is very positive, but one which changes slowly and imperceptibly without much of note is monotonous – and generally will be “flat”. Chocolates with a pronounced initial flavour spike also have a tendency to die quickly in the finish and once again assume a dreaded flatness. So that is a problem once again. In general a chocolate that evolves more slowly has a tendency to have greater length, and hence may have a leg up, but that doesn’t preclude first-class chocolates whose palette is constantly shifting, such as Domori Chacao Absolute and Valrhona Gran Couva, as long as the shifts seem logical and harmonious. This is my opinion, at any rate.

quote:


Something about Los Ancones reminds me of Lindt Excellence Madagascar. Perhaps those who love Los Ancones will like Lindt Madagascar more than I do.


Hmmm – I find Los Ancones and Excellence Madagascar to be such entirely different chocolates in every way as to be virtually separate species. They’re both superb, but for completely separate reasons bearing no relation to each other. Los Ancones is bold, very masculine, towering, complex. Excellence Madagascar is feminine, light, pleasant, simple. I’m surprised you would see similarities.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
December 13, 2006
3:54 am
ChemicalMachine
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 110
Member Since:
June 5, 2005
Offline
14

The similarities are that I find both to be non-assertive (by my questionable standard), and that I find similar flavors in each. The notes which I described as herbal in the Lindt Madagascar seem similar to the grass/herb/olive flavors in Los Ancones.

I often am distracted by a single aspect of a chocolate, which leads me to fail at understanding the chocolate’s total character.

I agree that a flavor change is sometimes jarring, but I associate this with the order in which the flavors are presented rather than the speed of their procession. It is pleasant if the flavor changes through continuous flavor transitions, moving always from one flavor to another which is somehow thematically related.

December 31, 2006
6:10 pm
Alan
Columbia, MO, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 99
Member Since:
April 20, 2006
Offline
15

I saw a Lindt Madagascar today and purchased it. I find their description of the chocolate on the back of the box to be very interesting, and it may account for some of the comments above:

“The Exotic tast of the Sambirano cocoa, grown in the north-western part of the island of Madagascar, imbues this grestigious chocolate with a sost and harmonious character, enriched with a hint of vanilla.”

I have never tried a “grestigious” and “sost” chocolate before, so this should be quite an experience. [:D]

Just thought it was a bit funny.

[url="http://www.Patric-Chocolate.com"]Patric Chocolate[/url]
December 31, 2006
11:10 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 256
Member Since:
July 5, 2006
Offline
16

I am not a fan but let us know what you think after you try it…

Robert
http://www.chocolateguild.com

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
January 22, 2007
5:36 pm
Scott--DFW
Dallas, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 74
Member Since:
October 26, 2006
Offline
17

An ingredient question on Lindt’s Madagascar.

In the Chocopaedia review, the ingredient listing is “Cocoa mass, Sugar, Cocoa butter, Vanilla beans.” On the bars I’ve bought in the US, the list reads, “Chocolate, Sugar, Cocoa butter, Vanilla.” Whenever I see “chocolate” listed as an ingredient in the US, I recoil, since the way that term is defined in the Code of Federal Regulations is incredibly broad, encompassing way more than cacao solids. There are so many laughable typos on the boxes the bars come in, that this could just be inadvertent. Do the bars sold in the UK clearly say “cocoa mass,” instead of “chocolate”?

Scott

January 22, 2007
8:02 pm
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 614
Member Since:
July 31, 2006
Offline
18

They have been messing a lot with these recipes over the last few years, but I will check some recent bars and let you know.

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
January 22, 2007
8:06 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline
19

Mine is not the American version but the European, no doubt, as evidenced by the lack of English text on the box. Cocoa mass, not chocolate, is the main ingredient here.

January 27, 2007
10:23 pm
Eshra
Southgate, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 178
Member Since:
February 14, 2006
Offline
20

I just sampled the Lindt Madagascan bar and was somewhat disappointed.
I felt that they overdid it a little on the vanilla and cocoa butter.
The aroma is interesting–containing herbal, floral, and vanilla notes.

However, consider the following: A 40 gram serving has 11 grams of sugar in it, leaving 29 grams of cocoa solids. Twenty grams of that is cocoa fat (much of it undoubtedly added), meaning the bar is roughly 68% fat, not counting the added sugar.

This means that Lindt added around 4-6 grams of additional cocoa butter per 40 gram serving. This does not seem justifiable. I feel this bar would have faired FAR better without such additions….

Sean