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suggestions for flavoured bars
May 20, 2005
12:23 pm
chocolatero
london
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Hello everyone

We are working on some new flavoured bars (as summer is the only development time). Currently we do black cardamon, tonka, violet, ginger and we are working on milk choco and lumi (sun dried lime), white choco and olive oil, possibly dark choco and Ylang Ylang
any suggestions from your home kitchens would be great
chocolatero

May 20, 2005
2:50 pm
Sebastian
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Go through your spice rack and start experimenting with everything there. I was really amazed at what worked well – things that I’d never have considered putting in chocolate were really very good. Of course, you’ll have to find the right level to use them at..

May 20, 2005
3:05 pm
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
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What do you think about a flavoured, nibbed bar? I know putting nibs in chocolate has become a bit of a cliché, but I personally can’t get enough of it. Always good for a chocolatey munch! Nibs with a darker spice, like cinnamon or black pepper could work well. Also, I’m not a big white fan, but if you put nibs in I might get interested …

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
May 20, 2005
4:22 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Not to burst your bubble, but Dagoba has a bar called Xocolatl, which is a 74% chocolate with chilis, maca, nutmeg, and vanilla. It’s quite an addictive bar, actually, with high notes of cherries and grapes.

And the white chocolate with olive oil has been done by Vosges [;)] She also added Kalamata olives to the chocolate, as well, but the effect wasn’t great, though. Perhaps you should oust her on this one [;)]

Recently, I experimented with cumin and ginger with a 70% chocolate, and the results were surprisingly good. All I tasted was a smoky kick with a slight sweetness, a combination which matched perfectly with the chocolate.

Have you ever thought about making a swirled bar, of perhaps milk and dark, with added ingredients? Or try sun dried tomatoes and chocolate, maybe with a touch of paprika or chili powder…or even basil instead. Tomatoes and chocolate pair remarkably well.

Lime, coconut, macadamia nuts, and white chocolate.
Blueberries and lemon peel.

[:)]

May 20, 2005
4:49 pm
alex_h
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one of my favorite ingredients is salt.

May 20, 2005
5:28 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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March 17, 2005
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Salt IMHO is fabulous surprise in chocolate, compliments the buttery melt. Just wonder why I seems not found the dark chocolate with salt, only milk ones… And better made wasabi (dark one) would be surely appreciated.

May 20, 2005
5:31 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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Oh, and must say I’ve some artisian swirled design bars here.

May 20, 2005
6:36 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Smoked salt would be an interesting addition.

May 20, 2005
7:13 pm
chocolatero
london
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actually we tried to smoke sugar and that was really nice
also smoked lemon peel
but could not produce enough… if any one knows a good smokery in the uk…
chocolatero

May 20, 2005
10:31 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Hmm, smoked sugar. Have you ever tried molasses or less refined sugar (i.e. sugar that still possesses its molasses)? Fructose might be an idea, especially for those conscious about their sugar intake.

May 23, 2005
1:26 pm
blue_bear_666
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I recommend trying fennel seeds and / or licquorice. Perhaps you already do that in some of your bonbons, I can’t remember.

Carroway might be another interesting one.

May 23, 2005
3:51 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Thyme and lemon…or rosemary and lemon [:)]

May 23, 2005
7:38 pm
guernsey ben
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how about salt and pepper, honey and ginger , green tea,

May 23, 2005
8:30 pm
cacaofan
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May 22, 2005
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would think some of the milder flavours would have to be put in white choc – or they would be overwhelmed by the cocoa itself

that said, how about adding simple infusion of fresh mint into the chocolate? have seen mint crackle or mint fondant bars, but none with the mint actually blended with the chocolate…

May 23, 2005
11:32 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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When you say “mint crackle,” do you mean actual pieces of the mint leaf itself blended in with the chocolate? I’ve had chocolate where the mint was infused into the chocolate but not where the leaf itself was present.

Milder flavors can work with dark chocolate, but it just depends on which chocolate you use. Obviously, some chocolate is more assertive and stronger than others. Lighter toned dark chocolate such as Maracaibo, might pair well with lighter flavors, while darker toned chocolate such as Sur del Lago will indeed overwhelm the flavorings. It’s all trial and error…to an extent. And it also depends on the amount of flavorings you add.

May 24, 2005
10:12 am
green
Trondheim, Norway
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How about orange (orange peel, not candied) and cinnamon? (Perhaps in a dark choc, in the 80% range…)

May 24, 2005
2:37 pm
green
Trondheim, Norway
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quote:


Originally posted by Montegrano

Hmm, smoked sugar. Have you ever tried molasses or less refined sugar (i.e. sugar that still possesses its molasses)? Fructose might be an idea, especially for those conscious about their sugar intake.


Fructose is actually not as good for lowering sugar intake as generally believed. It has a low GI, it doesn’t (obviosly) rise glycose in the blood so it doesn’t effect insulin in the veins. But what it DOES do, is rise fructoselevels in the liver. This again stimulates insulin production that sends insulin to the liver. That prosess, gradually making the liver insulinresistent is not much better than making the veins resistent…

May 24, 2005
5:00 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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It’s all relative [;)] For example, the most insulin sensitive tissue in the body is skeletal muscle, which therefore has a greater impact on overall resistance. Increasing muscle mass enhances the available glucose storage area, which in turn, clears glucose from blood circulation and reduces the amount of insulin necessary to maintain normal glucose tolerance. Also, this reduces the risk of obesity, heart disease, osteoporosis, etc. However, in the end, fructose is still much more suitable than sucrose because it’s much sweeter. As a result, the amount one requires is much less; a reduction of nearly 50% of fructose is needed to achieve the same sweetening effects of sucrose.

May 25, 2005
12:26 am
Sebastian
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Actually, what GI measures is the incremental area under the curve of the concentration of plasma glucose over a given period of time. What does that mean? It means that after you eat a fixed amount of an ingredient (say, fructose – don’t confuse this with high fructose corn syrup – they’re vastly different), your blood will be taken at given intervals and the amount of glucose measured. This information is then plotted in a graph that has concentration on the y axis, and time on the x. the area under that curve is then used to calculate that glycemic index. The higher the number, the more glucose that is present in your blood. Once in your blood, your body doesn’t care where it came from – it’s simply been converted to glucose, which the body sees as an energy source (it’s the gas in your gas tank, for example). Glucose is glucose, no matter where it comes from, so biogically speaking, your body doesn’t care what the source is. For comparative purposes, the GI scale is 0-100, with erythritol being 0, and glucose (dextrose) being 100. Sugar (sucrose) is about 66, and fructose is about 22. Maltitol, which is often used for diabetic products, is about 35. From a purely GI standpoint, fructose therefore is likely to be more appropriate for diabetics than maltitol is.

The second aspect to consider is that while glycemic index measures the amount of glucose, there’s another index that measures the amount of insulin, called – insulinemic index. While in most cases it follows that if an ingredient has a low GI, it’s II will also be low – that’s not always the case. Truth be told, I’ve no idea what fructose’s II is.

If a person is going to use these measures to make decisions, one s hould probably give some attention to the concept of glycemic load – which is factoring in the amount of the product (say, fructose) in the finished product. If it’s in there at only 1% of the formula, it’s contribution to blood sugar is very, very small. if it’s 90% of the formula, it’s much higher, obviously. GI by itself doesn’t tell you much, unless you’re eating 100% pure product, which i can’t imagine 8-)

Most folks don’t make chocolate with fructose as the bulking sweetener, because it’s a bear to work with in a processing facility. there are some brave souls doing it, and they make very good products doing so.

May 25, 2005
8:35 am
cacaofan
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wow, we have quite a discussion on nutritional values here – seems we have quite a few food scientists among us! well, it’s always interesting to know about food and how it affects our body.

anyways, with regard to mint crackle, i was thinking more of mint flavoured candy crushed into small bits and embedded in chocolate, like in some newsagent candy bars – exact names escape my mind, although there is a mint-flavoured Yorkie that fits that description. A world away from fine chocolate, but still something i’ve encountered nonetheless.

Which bars have actual mint infused in them? haven’t seen any around, but then again these are probably gourmet bars which aren’t easily available – didn’t really look out for them in my forays to the gourmet shops