3 Jan 2014: The Forum is currently in read-only made while we update to a new version of the Seventy% website and forum.

The forum will be back with a faster, simplified and up to date website in the next two months.

Please consider registering
guest

Log In

Lost password?
Advanced Search:

— Forum Scope —



— Match —



— Forum Options —




Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

The forums are currently locked and only available for read only access
Topic RSS
best in PARIS AND LONDON
April 15, 2007
6:57 pm
chocoholicsue
Santa Barbara, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 5
Member Since:
April 15, 2007
Offline

Hi,

I am new to this forum but wanted to ask some of you chocolate lovers some advice. I have always loved what I thought was chocolate, until I began learning what REAL chocolate is (thanks to this site and also Chloe Doutre-Roussel’s book)by trying out the best,pure bars that I can get.

BUT, I will be in Paris and London in 2 weeks and thought since I was there, I would try some of the master chocolatiers’ finest works just to get a comparison and to learn more. Here is a list of the places I will try to get to, but wanted to know what you all thought I should try once I actually get in to the shops.

Thank you in advance for your help!

PARIS
Patrick roger
Pierre Herme (caramel fleur de sel Macaron, truffle blanche )
Laduree
Pierre Marcolini
Cacao et Chocolat
Marquise De Sevigne
Chapon
Jacques Genin (if I’m lucky enough to get in)
La Maison du Chocolat (will try the Zagora, Andalousie, Garrigue and Maiko)
Patrice Chapon
Christian Constant
Michel Chaudun (his signature Pave)
John-Charles Rochoux
For the bars, BON MARCHE (la grande epicerie)
LONDON
Melt
Hotel Chocolat
L’Artisan du Chocolat
Paul Young
Roccoco
Prestat
Charbonnel et Walker

April 15, 2007
7:31 pm
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 614
Member Since:
July 31, 2006
Offline

For London, I’d drop Prestat and Charbonnel and make William Curley a must. You could also stop by de Marquette.

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
April 16, 2007
10:45 pm
confiseur
Switzerland
Member
Forum Posts: 51
Member Since:
October 14, 2005
Offline

…..not sure about Hotel Chocolat either….their marketing is excellent but I am pretty sure they buy most of the finished chocolates in..mainly from Belgium ,Germany and France..

April 17, 2007
12:14 am
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 614
Member Since:
July 31, 2006
Offline

Quite right confiseur – I missed that name in the list.

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
April 17, 2007
12:30 am
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline

quote:


Originally posted by chocoholicsue

Hi,

I am new to this forum but wanted to ask some of you chocolate lovers some advice. I have always loved what I thought was chocolate, until I began learning what REAL chocolate is (thanks to this site and also Chloe Doutre-Roussel’s book)by trying out the best,pure bars that I can get.

… but wanted to know what you all thought I should try once I actually get in to the shops.

PARIS
Patrick roger
Pierre Herme (caramel fleur de sel Macaron, truffle blanche )
Laduree
Pierre Marcolini
Cacao et Chocolat
Marquise De Sevigne
Chapon
Jacques Genin (if I’m lucky enough to get in)
La Maison du Chocolat (will try the Zagora, Andalousie, Garrigue and Maiko)
Patrice Chapon
Christian Constant
Michel Chaudun (his signature Pave)
John-Charles Rochoux
For the bars, BON MARCHE (la grande epicerie)
LONDON
Melt
Hotel Chocolat
L’Artisan du Chocolat
Paul Young
Roccoco
Prestat
Charbonnel et Walker


First thing: trim your list, unless you have a month to spend! I’ve found it generally impractical to visit more than 2 shops a day. Part of this is the sheer logistics of getting from shop to shop. There’s also the matter of quantity consumed per day – and you’ll want to try several different chocolates from each company.

Second: some impressions on chocolatiers I have visited:

Paris:
Marcolini: A bit mild for my taste. Is he among the best? Not by my book but I don’t deny he’s a quality chocolatier.
La Maison du Chocolat: In spite of being now a “mini-chain”, the hype is well-deserved. Excellent. You should visit.
M de S: Volume producer. There are better things to do in Paris.
Chaudun: IIRC this was where I got the typical French haughtiness. The chocolates were good, but there were better elsewhere.

London:
Hotel Chocolat: More about marketing image than anything. The chocolate is OK, but not a world-beater. I think they’re trying, but I don’t think they’re obsessive. No specific need to visit unless you have lots of time.
Rococo: I don’t get the hype. They seemed good, not great.
L’Artisan: The best in London. Excellent chocolates throughout the range. Visit for sure, especially since it’s convenient to the museum district.
Prestat: Pretty low-grade. No reason to visit.
C & W: Same situation applies as M de S in Paris.

While in Paris, also visit Michel Cluizel. I have to say I was very favourably impressed with my visit there. The service was wonderful, the chocolate – well, it’s Cluizel. What more need be said?

I have a “system” when it comes to trying chocolatiers. I always try first and most importantly their top-end pure ganache (usually called truffle). No extraneous flavours here, just pure chocolate. Then I try a fruit (most commonly raspberry), a nut (most commonly hazelnut) and a spice or herb (mint is a good reference, cinnamon another). If they have a signature flavour I’ll try that as well. If they have a floral flavour I find that interesting but it’s not part of the “system” per se, so I’ll just try it if it’s there. The one thing you do want to do is try at least one chocolate that is the same from all chocolatiers (the plain ganache is the easiest because any good chocolatier will have one) so that you get an idea of relative differences. Otherwise it’s apples and oranges.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
April 17, 2007
9:31 am
confiseur
Switzerland
Member
Forum Posts: 51
Member Since:
October 14, 2005
Offline

Do not miss in Paris…..Dallayau at 99 rue Faubourg St. Honore .I am not sure if Pascal Niau is still there but this is a seriously good patisserie/confiserie/traiteurwith excellent chocolates….

April 17, 2007
6:35 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline

quote:


Originally posted by confiseur

…L’Artisan..best in London?…a few years ago maybe…very competent but basically the chocolates are all very similar…poured out infused/flavoured ganaches in the French style…chrystalise…cut with guitar…put through the enrober..decorate with PCB decor foils…
There is (or should be ) more to chocolatiers than being predominantly a ganache maker…IMO they have not improved since moving to the factory in Kent….


I usually don’t think of similarity of chocolates as being automatically a negative. If the chocolates are in a similar style but all excellent, that, as far as I’m concerned, makes them a good chocolatier. Also originality plays little part in my evaluation of a chocolatier. You can probably guess that by the way I described how I do an assessment. I place far more weight on flawlessly executed basic chocolates – such things as a plain ganache or a fruit chocolate, than I do on whether the confections are ones I’ve seen elsewhere or not.

Not, of course, that I’ve tried every chocolatier in London or anywhere else for that matter. That might be impossible in any case due to different places coming and going. IME however after trying a sufficient number of places, you get a sufficiently clear view of the landscape to list a probable winner.

Oh, a “whoops”: I meant to give a comment on Melt as well. Very good, but uneven. The people seemed a little high-strung and overeager. Select your chocolates with care, but do visit.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
April 18, 2007
5:04 pm
chocolatero
london
Member
Forum Posts: 155
Member Since:
September 5, 2004
Offline

I think some people on this site who may be involved in chocolate shops or businesses particularly in the UK should not comment on competitors. I find it unethical orleast they should make clear who they are…

Anne weyns
Director,l’artisan du chocolat ltd
chocolatero

April 19, 2007
12:58 am
seneca
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 208
Member Since:
May 22, 2005
Offline

I know that it’s not directly responsive to this thread, but I’d just like to second Chocolatero’s comment…For my part, I always try to be open and clear about that information.

http://bittersweetcafe.blogspot.com
http://www.bittersweetcafe.com

http://bittersweetcafe.blogspot.com http://www.bittersweetcafe.com
April 19, 2007
12:59 am
seneca
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 208
Member Since:
May 22, 2005
Offline
10

(Although I should point out that I don’t have any stores in London or Paris :-)

http://bittersweetcafe.blogspot.com
http://www.bittersweetcafe.com

http://bittersweetcafe.blogspot.com http://www.bittersweetcafe.com