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Blend it yourself
November 5, 2004
10:58 am
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
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I thought chocolatero made a very interesting suggestion in another thread about making up our own blends, which didn’t really get picked up on ([url]/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=237&whichpage=2[/url]).

Given this is how some of the best chocolatiers balance flavours for a particular chocolate or ganache, and that most of the world’s chocolate is a blend, I thought it would be informative if some of us could give it a go – so I’m opening up a challenge to you adventurous types to create your own bar!

To make this work you need to be able to temper properly by hand, so any tips and discussion of the techniques involved for small quantities would also help.

Martin Christy
Editor
www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
November 5, 2004
11:08 am
alex_h
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cool idea! i have no idea what tempering is though :-) i therefore welcome any ideas, thoughts, techniques, etc. as well.

November 5, 2004
11:15 am
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
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Be good to get the discussion on tempering going again, especially with reports back on successes and failures! There’s a good intro here though [url]/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=138&SearchTerms=temper[/url]

Martin Christy
Editor
www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
November 5, 2004
11:49 am
Masur
Stockholm, Sweden
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Mor information about tempering (written in German):
[url]http://www.chocoland.ch/handtemp.php[/url]

“Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos” (Marieel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
November 5, 2004
6:23 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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I have thought about this recently, actually, and even thought about chocolate-chocolate tastings, where one tastes different chocolates that complement each other, in much the same manner as a wine-chocolate tasting is conducted. As opposed to tasting chocolate to discern differences in origin, bean, etc., I think it would be interesting to taste different chocolates where the contrasting or similar flavors, cocoa contents, etc. enhanced the flavors of each rather than provide a stark contrast. Now, the method of delivery is what I’m still contemplating, such as whether you eat the chocolates together or eat them separately. Also, if the latter route is preferred, then in what order are they eaten and what space intervals are acceptable? However, if the former is opted for, then in a sense, you’re “blending” chocolates in your mouth, which is a much more crude method, I suppose, than that achieved by a more refined technique such as tempering.

May 13, 2005
4:14 pm
alex_h
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do you think this thing is any good for tempering/blending?

http://www.chocolatetradingco…….asp?ID=25

May 13, 2005
5:58 pm
Sebastian
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doubt it. would likely melt just fine, but from the look of it it’ll be useless as a tempering machine.

May 13, 2005
7:39 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Yeah, and besides, I’ve never seen a tempering machine for that cheap.

May 13, 2005
8:05 pm
Masur
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I have a similar melter and payed around 22 Euro for it. It works fine for chocolate fondue but you are not allowed to put anything else in the melting pot than chocolate. The melting pot is too small and not good for blending. This is for fun and what I would call a standard Chineese OEM product.

“Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos” (Maricel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
May 14, 2005
12:23 am
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
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Going back to the original subject of this thread, I’ve been talking to chocolatero about having a bar made for Seventypercent that could be our own blend of known couvertures. This is just an early idea, but I’d be interested to throw this open to the forum for ideas, and perhaps we can come up with a forum blend? Please post ideas.

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
May 14, 2005
2:36 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Blend Java or New Guinea with Venezuela, preferably a dark toned cacao, such as Sur del Lago. Or try the Saint Dominique.

Or give a high cocoa content milk bar a spin. Perhaps a highly characterized Madagascar cacao would produce a light, yet very chocolaty and palatable chocolate.

What couverture is available to work with, btw?

May 14, 2005
9:11 am
legodude
Norway
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How about a Manjari Milk?

"I`ve got lots of friends in San José. Do you know the way to San José?"
May 14, 2005
5:10 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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I don’t know if a Manjari milk would be a good idea because Manjari is already mild enough as it is. I was thinking more along the lines of a very pronounced Madagascar chocolate of maybe at least 70% cocoa content as the base. You could argue by mentioning Cluizel Mangaro Lait 50%, but imo the original Mangaro 65% is a tad more assertive than Manjari.

May 14, 2005
5:15 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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14

But I think the lighter toned and citrus-laced smokiness of New Guinea would combine well with the darker toned Venezuela that has flavors of cocoa, slight dairy, and red fruits. It would be really interesting, imo.