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BLOG: - Domori divide, 16 April 2005
April 17, 2005
11:59 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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Absolutely! Domori ends up with very unique wonderfull product, and it’s so good to know that it’s actually because cocoa beans have been interfered with less. Texture is marvelous. Did not get the bit about “disel” note? Domori varies a lot from butch to butch and some could be a bit “off”? Anyways, did not once have any other impressions from Domori stuff apart from complex, fabulous and eye-opener ocasionally. Bit too sweet sometimes for 70%, but i find in a lot with anyones.
What would you say of Amedei?

April 18, 2005
6:23 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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A couple forum members in the past have complained about a peculiar “diesel” flavor in some Porcelana bars, but I have yet to encounter this. I suspect Domori may have used freight truck fumes from the exhaust pipes to fumigate the beans [;)] (Kidding, of course). However, I have experienced batch variability with several Domori bars, most notably the Porcelana. My last Porcelana had a distinct Granny Smith apple tone with a tartness to match. So imagine my surprise after discovering this flavor when I was already accustomed to the much more reserved bread, butter, and jam of previous bars. I appreciate this small batch variability to an extent, and sometimes it simply cannot be avoided, but when a certain chocolate becomes frequently unpredictable, then I become somewhat perturbed. If such variability were to become recurring, then I would recommend that each batch be labeled accordingly to make the public aware. Which Domori 70% chocolate do you find “sweet?”

April 18, 2005
10:24 am
alex_h
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three cheers for domori!!! may they continue making what i consider the best chocolate.
i know no other chocolate that compares (though pralus comes close in texture) and would even go so far as to give their product a different name.

April 18, 2005
11:37 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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I did find Sambirano and Rio caribe quite sweet – or may be mild? Don’t mind my sweetness barometer, it’s way too sensetive sometimes. Regarding Porcelana – I think yes, Domori’s batches do vary, and it’s wonderfull. And also last time i’ve left Porcelana open ( in its wraper) for few days and just finished it now, finding at last those elusive notes of “smoke” and “banana”, which never could identify before. But looking at my first tasting notes for the same bar i was surprised to see “cherry and red fruits”, which completely disappeared! Could it be alcohol base? Would explain changes in fruitiness – the fresher the chocolate, the more fruity it would feel? Find the Domori aroma so irresistible and quite alcoholic, like red wine for a reason? Not that i mind[:)]

April 19, 2005
12:01 am
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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Alex, i laughed out loud. How about chocorino? Or Mackolate?

April 19, 2005
12:54 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Domori’s Rio Caribe and Sambirano are actually quite tart chocolates, so it seems that you associate tart red fruits with sweetness. Considering your past comments on other chocolate, I suspect that whenever you taste a chocolate with red fruits, you automatically deem it as “sweet,” regardless of cocoa content. This isn’t a bad thing, of course, but it’s just a pattern I noticed.

April 19, 2005
8:16 am
alex_h
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@ elli:
;)

April 19, 2005
1:14 pm
ellie
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Yes, Monte, I actually like red fruit or berry notes in the chocolate – the reason i keep going to my next door overpriced Maison Blanc pretending doing something else and end up with Cluizel bars. But i think with Domori, with Rio Caribe especially, it’s nuttiness, peanuts, which enhance sweetness and kind of bland the chocolate intencity for me.

April 19, 2005
3:20 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Yeah, nuts usually have an association with other “sweet” foods, and they certainly imply a sense of richness. I find that a lot of Domori’s chocolate has a distinct nuttiness, as well, but then again, this is more common among their Venezuelan chocolate overall, most of which is inherently nutty anyway, such as Rio Caribe and Carupano. For example, have you tried Valrhona’s Caraibe? The almond is quite distinct and even bears hints of cashews that I find appealing. Domori’s version has some of the same flavor, but since roasting time and bean selection influence final flavor, it’s accentuated differently. Sur del Lago, I find to be more reminiscent of hazelnuts, with slight traces of peanuts sometimes. Carupano is like a mix but with heavier dairy tones. Not surprising, though, especially since most of Venezuela’s prime growing regions are in such close proximity.

April 19, 2005
3:30 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Well, let me postulate another theory, perhaps quite the reverse of my previous supposition: if you find red fruits an ideal flavor, then perhaps your mind has singled it out and assumed it to be an axiomatic flavor that must be present in any given chocolate, and any lack thereof is extremely noticebale. You claimed that the cherries or red fruitiness of Porcelana disappeared after a while, so I imagine that mentally, you have come to expect its presence and have singled it out completely subconsciously to focus on the other flavors. Perhaps that’s why these flavors are not as noticeable to you. Did you by chance detect a red fruit tone in Sur del Lago? It’s quite subtle and hides underneath the dark tone of the chocoalte, but it’s there, lurking in the background, and it’s such a wonderful flavor.

April 19, 2005
6:54 pm
ellie
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Sur de Lago’s so complex, isn’t it? My original notes were-(must be mad ;) ) – red wine, plume, bread+raisins, cherry peak, going into brandy, with dark,herby tones in the background. A bit dusty texture at some point. And that wasn’t not all. And it made me go and remind myself of Pralus Venesuela.

April 19, 2005
8:25 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Hmm, those are interesting notes. Domori’s chocolate certainly is a bit “wild” regardless of type, and I usually detect various flavors throughout. Generally, Sur del Lago isn’t “that” complex, but rather I find the tone to be predominantly nutty and cocoa, with varying degress of dairy. Soft red fruit and floral tones are arcehtypal too, but certainly other flavors are open to interpretation. For instance, I detected a hint of cheese and tropical fruits in Domori’s Sur del Lago.

April 22, 2005
5:32 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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I was not happy with my Pralus Venezuela bar because it was packaged right underneath the Java bar, which as you may recall, has quite a distinctively strong smoke and leather flavor and aroma, so consequently, the Venezuela bar picked up some of those odors. However, I did detect characteristics common to Sur del Lago in the Venezuela bar, so I’m assuming those are the beans that comprise it.

Actually, Pralus’ decision to replace the Java bar in the Pyramide was indeed a wise one because the Java bar is far too overpowering and will easily contaminate other chocolate. But if he were to actually wrap the bars in a better protective barrier, then this problem could be avoided altogether.

April 22, 2005
8:15 am
alex_h
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though the packaging of the pralus pyramid is really nice they should do something about it as u suggest, monte.

April 22, 2005
11:57 am
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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Agree absolutely – that paper’s unsufficient. Though btw some aluminium foil has very strong metallic smell and sometimes seems like even affects the taste of a first bit of chocolate. Wrapper has to be inert and non-porous enough, like Domori’s or may be that foils with paper backing, – ae Amedei or Bonnat.

April 22, 2005
4:08 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Foil is the best method for protecting chocolate. Whenever I wrap loose chocolate, I use a piece of aluminum foil because not only is it the most non-porous of wrapping material, but also it imparts no odor or metallic flavor of its own. Plastic and paper are not exactly wise, and neither is paper-lined foil, which I actually have come to despise. Over time, the paper will transfer its own odor to the chocolate, and as a result, bars that have been stored in this manner for an extended amount of time will taste like paper or will even taste somewhat flat.

And Ellie, that’s why I like to let my chocolate breathe before tasting. I want it exposed to the air just in case; that way, all residual odors from any kind of wrapper will dissipate. Also, if you’re tasting a metallic chocolate, several reasons could explain the metallic flavor:
1. the chocolate has been Dutched
2. rancid cocoa solids
3. poor quality beans
4. beans have not been processed correctly

April 22, 2005
4:48 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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17

Rancid cocoa sounds most repulsive, i’m sure it never’d passed my lips. Do try not to poison myself. So what do you think of Domori’s wrappers?

April 22, 2005
5:04 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Well, there’s no way no knowing if the cacao has gone rancid except by consumption. Domori’s packaging is okay, I guess, although I would much rather prefer to see foil. Have you ever smelled plastic? It has its own odor, and the airtight sealing traps this in. This makes me a bit wary, and it is for this reason I allow all my Domori to breathe longer than most brands.