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chocolate and coughing
March 9, 2005
10:56 pm
kevin
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March 9, 2005
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Hi. Any ideas on how much chocolate you’d have to eat before you’d get enough theobromine to help with a persistent cough?

Hey, guys, this is a great site. Thank you for providing it. By the way, there was another interesting study that just came out on chocolate:
Regular consumption of a flavanol-rich chocolate can improve oxidant stress in young soccer players. Clin Dev Immunol. 2005 Mar;12(1):11-7.

I usually am able to access most medical articles (as I work as a librarian). Let me know if anyone wants copies.

Cheers,
Kevin

March 10, 2005
10:30 am
alex_h
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April 29, 2004
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hi kevin,

the only thing i could find on chocolate and coughing is here:

http://www.seventypercent.com/…..PIC_ID=295

what’s the gist of the article on soccer players? can you summarize it for us or is there a link to it?

oh, and welcome to seventypercent :-)

March 10, 2005
6:41 pm
kevin
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March 9, 2005
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Hi. Here is the abstract to the soccer article:

Regular consumption of a flavanol-rich chocolate can improve oxidant stress in young soccer players.

Fraga CG, Actis-Goretta L, Ottaviani JI, Carrasquedo F, Lotito SB, Lazarus S, Schmitz HH, Keen CL.

Fisicoquimica-PRALIB, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina. cfraga@ffyb.uba.ar

The consumption of a diet rich in certain flavonoids, including the flavanol sub-class, has been associated with a reduced risk for vascular disease. We evaluated the effects of the regular consumption (14 d) of a flavanol-containing milk chocolate (FCMC) or cocoa butter chocolate (CBC) on variables related to vascular disease risk, oxidative stress and physical activity. Twenty-eight free-living, young (18-20 years old) male soccer players consumed daily 105 g of FCMC (168 mg of flavanols) or CBC (< 5 mg of flavanols), as part of their normal diet. The consumption of FCMC was significantly associated with a decrease in diastolic blood pressure (- 5 mm Hg), mean blood pressure (- 5 mm Hg), plasma cholesterol (-11%), LDL-cholesterol (-15%), malondialdehyde (- 12%), urate (- 11%) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity (- 11%), and an increase in vitamin E/cholesterol (+ 12%). No relevant changes in these variables were associated with CBC consumption. No changes in the plasma levels of (-)-epicatechin were observed following analysis of fasting blood samples. In conclusion, FCMC consumption was associated with changes in several variables often associated with cardiovascular health and oxidant stress. The presence of significant quantities of flavanols in FCMC is likely to have been one of the contributing factors to these results.

March 12, 2005
1:48 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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This is quite ironic, as cocoa processing workers experience a hefty prevalence of chronic respiratory problems, ranging from 5% to 30%. Lung function tends to decrease when cocoa “dust” is inhaled.

You would need to consume 200g of chocolate in order to experience the full benefit of cough suppression. So, take two bars and call me in the morning.

March 20, 2005
6:22 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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March 20, 2005
6:10 pm
Sebastian
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I would strongly disagree with your respiratory statement as it pertains to cocoa workers. While it’s true that single or sub micron particle sizes of dust interfere with lungs, it’s simply not a problem in any cocoa factory i’ve been in, and i’ve been in many of the world’s largest. The systems are largely closed systems, and dusting is extremely minimized. You’re likely to find far more dusting in large cereal or sweetener facilities. Also, as with polyphenols, the concentration of the theobromine can vary wildly, based on source and processing. While some bars may indeed have low enough [theobromine]‘s so as to require 200g, others will have much higher []‘s.

March 20, 2005
7:16 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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Well, yeah, cocoa workers in closed environments. That’s who I was referring to.