Please consider registering
guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —

  

— Match —

   

— Forum Options —

   

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Topic RSS
chocolate covered coffee beans
March 16, 2005
1:26 am
vmixr2000
Portland, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
June 22, 2004
Offline

I have recently bought a small tumbler attachment for the kitchenaid mixer. I have tried several times to make chocolate covered coffee beans, but i keep running into the problem of the beans sticking together. If anyone has ever successfully made these before i would greatly appreciate any advice.

March 16, 2005
4:09 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline

I've seen several techniques, some of which are time-consuming while others are messy and don't produce "pretty" results. Here are a couple:

1. You could buy a mold, fill it with chocolate, place a bean on the chocolate, then fill the rest of the mold with chocolate.
2. Spread the beans on a cookie sheet, then cover with a layer of chocolate.
3. Dip the beans individually in melted chocolate.

If you're not happy with the outside appearance, try rolling them in cocoa powder when the chocolate has almost set, then allow them to harden further. Or you could double coat them with chocolate. Maybe do one layer white, then another dark.

March 16, 2005
1:12 pm
Sebastian
Member
Forum Posts: 430
Member Since:
September 30, 2004
Offline

Walk me through your process, step by step. Temperatures, times, amounts, etc. Do you have a forced air vent blowing into the pan? Typical weight gains are in the range of 60-70% - is that what you're shooting for? I assume you're using chocolate - tempered or not? Are you doing a polishing step after chocolate panning?

March 16, 2005
1:43 pm
chocolatero
london
Member
Forum Posts: 155
Member Since:
September 5, 2004
Offline

we do these sometime for our shop and you can do
1) work in cold place, near air co, in front of fridge any where so that chocolate can cool fast
2) you are probably adding the chocolate too fast. in fact you can do this in any bowl. be patient add a BIT of hot chocolate and mix well with spatula until the products feel dry to touch (also change color)
only then add more to build progressive layer
to finish them shiny on a small scale, add a bit of cocoa butter at the end. won;t make it really shiny but mostpolishers are only available for industry
the smaller the product the harder to prevent sticking,
may be try with almonds first
if only a few are sticking you can separate them at the end
hope it helps
chocolatero

March 17, 2005
12:08 am
vmixr2000
Portland, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 13
Member Since:
June 22, 2004
Offline

Ive been starting off with 1/2 pound of coffee. I think ill need to have at least a 4 to 1 ratio of chocolate to coffee. I begin by slighly dusting the coffee in cocoa powder so that the slight amount of oil on the beans doesnt cause any problems with the chocolate coating. I then drizzle small amounts of chocolate onto the beans and wait till it hardens to add another coating. I have been working in cool room but do not yet have a cooling or fan system set up. The problem i am running into is the flat sides of the beans sticking together. Do you think if i were to cool them faster this wouldnt happen?

March 17, 2005
1:57 am
chocolatero
london
Member
Forum Posts: 155
Member Since:
September 5, 2004
Offline

unfortunately with asymetrical shapes it happens often
try moving the beans with your hands inside the cuve whilst turning
a lot of people at industrial level use a belt machine rather than a pan. in fact panning is something I know little about so
i am going to a course in june in Germany on panning
may be I can help further then
cooling faster would probably help but not stop the problem.
chocolatero

chocolate covered coffee beans | General Discussions | Forum