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chocolate packaging
June 10, 2005
9:01 am
coco_the_clown
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April 27, 2005
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I was just wondering what is the best type of packaging for chcoclate?

I´m asking this because a few weeks ago I opened a bar of nice chocolate I hadnt tried before the first to pieces i tasted were horrible, a bit like metal or rust, so i peeld back the foil and left it exposed for a few hours in the dark in its outer cardboard casing and it was really nice. I bought the same chocoalte bar again last week and i peeled the foil back and left and it was lovely!

Maybe it was just me, but i personally think the foil is not nice.[:(]

Going off topic here slightly but what also made me think about packaging was an articcle I read about water that comes in the plastic bottles and the plastic used seaps into the water,sometimes giving you horrible taste in some bottled waters and an american company has come up with a biodegradable plastic bottle!but that´s another story for another board!![:D]

June 10, 2005
11:34 am
Sebastian
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September 30, 2004
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Foil provides a good oxygen, moisture barrier, and light barrier. If it’s a sealed foil package, it’s one of the best types of packaging available. but expensive.

We’ve already come up with biodegradeable plastics – it’s made from corn, and requires only a little bit of water and sunlight to degrade. We’re selling it mostly in the US, because most of the corn used to make it isn’t GMO free – Germany had been our closest EU interest, but the concerns over GMO overrode the concerns over biodegradeability.

June 10, 2005
12:11 pm
alex_h
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April 29, 2004
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what’s sealed foil, sebastian? is that the kind domori uses?

June 10, 2005
12:37 pm
Sebastian
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yup. domori uses what’s called a hot seal. crimped at the edges, a little bit of heat is applied to the crimping to seal it tightly.

June 10, 2005
12:59 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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March 17, 2005
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Terribly interesting question. Biodegradeable is very good in terms of enviroment and Domori’s packaging i think’s the best ( is it biodegradeable, btw?). But isn’t it a contradictory incentive for packaging – biodegradeable from little sun or water would not keep chocolate safely from moisture and heat properly? Or for how long? And wouldn’t this “easy” plastics also “leak” plastic residue into product itself much easier? Sebastian, would you have 5 min to elaborate, pls?

June 10, 2005
1:21 pm
Sebastian
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I think we may have inadvertantly mixed topics here. There are two threads sort of going on at that same time – one is foil packaging, the other is biodegradeable plastics. Domori’s packaging isn’t biodegradeable, but it is foil. However, there are biodegradeable ‘plastics’ out there (they’re poly-lactic acid based – scientific mumbo jumbo meaning they’re from corn). They are not, as far as I’m aware, being used in any chocolate packaging applications; they are, however, used in many other applictions, from plastic ware (picnic forks) to trash bags to clothing to solid food storage bins, etc etc etc..

June 10, 2005
5:21 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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The best form of packaging is regular old foil. It reflect 95% radiant heat, is impermeable, and is a great insulator for chocolate. As a result, it does not allow excess moitsture to sneak in (but also keeps it trapped inside, which is useful for cooking) and keeps out odors. Also, it doesn’t impart its own flavors onto whatever food it’s surrounding. Have you ever tasted a metallic baked potato or an iron nuanced lasagna that were cooked in foil?

Coco, your problem is exactly why I always allow my chocolate to breathe after removing it from the wrapper. I also break the chocolate in small pieces, but that topic is discussed in another thread. Could you, by chance, share the name of the chocolate with which you experienced these problems?

June 12, 2005
11:10 am
coco_the_clown
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April 27, 2005
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sure, the chocolate was only a lindt 52% ecuadorian one, cant seem to get any other decent chocoalte unless i order it over the internet bu my postman, on his scooter, uses parcels as a back rest so i dont think that would be a good idea, plus the humidity and temperature is not good here very hot, have to keep the bread in the fridge in summer otherwise it goes mouldy in half a day!!

I like the 52% one htough, did try the 70% one not sure where the beans were from again but was not as nice. but still new to this!!
thanks to everyone that posted comments, i enjoy reading them as peoples experiiences are varied, etc.

if anyboys interested in the biodegradable plastic stuff theres a link here: (site is quite interesting sometimes;)
http://www.reactual.com/metaef…..and_drink/

June 12, 2005
4:36 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Another suspect is bad beans or Dutched cocoa, both of which will have a metallic or iron flavor in the finished chocolate.

Yeah, the Excellence 70% and 85% are both quite good, actually.