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CHUAO and porcelana
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Sebastian
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February 1, 2005 - 1:12 pm
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agree with you 100% monty - it's pedigree as well as geography as well as processing

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legodude
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February 1, 2005 - 3:04 pm
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Well according to Domori's website, the value of chocolate is 50% cacao's genetics, and soil and weather only 5%. If that is correct I guess you can take a let`s say Ocumare 61 and plant in Chuao and Madagascar and the chocolate will taste pretty much the same from both places. Of course the prossesing must be the same for both. Or?

"I`ve got lots of friends in San José. Do you know the way to San José?"
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Sebastian
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February 1, 2005 - 8:38 pm
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I would respectfully disagree with their math. They're only accounting for 55% of the equation 😎 I've made chocolates made from the same genetic line, grown in both brazil, mexico, and the ivory coast, and there's significant differences..

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Hans-Peter Rot
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February 1, 2005 - 8:52 pm
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Your numbers add up to 55%, so what contributes to the remaining 45% of flavor? Processing obviously. But, I think soil and weather play a much more remarkable role than a mere 5%. A good quality soil will nurture a plant to the point that it will yield some of the best food you can get. Vidalia onions are the perfect example. The gases released in the soil contribute heavily to their sweet flavor. Planting a Vidalia onion plant outside of Vidalia, Georgia (in let's say, Hawaii) would not produce the same flavor that the soil in Vidalia does. In fact, Vidalia onions are your standard Yellow Granex variety found in every grocery store, but the nutrients and gases unique to the Vidalia soil transform the ordinary flavor into something extraordinary.

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Martin Christy
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February 1, 2005 - 11:00 pm
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I don't think there is a Chuao 'prototype' though, it's the mix of varieties, plus the conditions that make the flavour. So you will only get the true Chuao flavour from Chuao. Anything else might be very good, and interesting, but is unlikely to be quite the same. This doesn't mean Domori are not right, but you would need the combination of varieties to get Chuao, not just one genotype.

I think treatment by the maker would make up the other 45% ...

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Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
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legodude
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February 2, 2005 - 2:31 pm
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Fermenting and drying is 20% and factory prossesing is 25%. All according to Domori..

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CHUAO and porcelana | Page 2 | General Discussions | Forum