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cocoa literature
January 1, 2005
12:03 pm
alex_h
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i just went out and bought maricel presilla’s book on chocolate in german and was wondering whether i am alone in feeling that it is badly written? i put it down to bad translation, but after reading a few pages i don’t know. she jumps around a lot and doesn’t really explain terminology or give background info. gave me a bit of a headache in fact…

January 1, 2005
2:20 pm
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
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In English this is my favourite book, and an inspiration. Maybe you need to perserve, as she goes into more detail as the book goes on.

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
January 2, 2005
10:39 am
alex_h
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i have continued reading and it does get much better. seems to me that it does have something to do with the translation. the intro and the rest of the book were translated by two different people.

January 8, 2005
7:09 pm
theobroma
MIlwaukee, USA
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hi
what is the title of the book?
thanks

Oh no! My Agustus!

Oh no! My Agustus!
January 8, 2005
9:32 pm
Masur
Stockholm, Sweden
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The title is The New Taste of Chocolate.

“Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos” (Marieel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
January 12, 2005
3:00 pm
alex_h
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theo, the book describes a bit of the history, but mainly goes into the types of beans and processing and includes some recipes. i found it very informative, but can’t seem to recall specifics, except that mrs. presilla goes into detail when describing the different types.

January 12, 2005
7:34 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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I’ve mentioned this in another thread, but for those of you who did not see, I recommend this book:

100% Chocolate: The Saga of Chocolate by Katherine Khodorowsky and Dr. Herve Robert; published by Todtri

It has lots of nice pictures; explains the history of chocolate and the history of many brands; has tasting guides; lists many chocolate sources; and a lot of other neat information. Basically, it’s a hodge podge of information that’s a fun read. It even has 40 recipes, but then again, what kind of chocolate book doesn’t?

January 13, 2005
10:39 am
alex_h
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thanks, monte. will try and get a hold of it.

January 14, 2005
9:02 pm
theobroma
MIlwaukee, USA
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Ah… I have read the New Taste of Chocolate. I liked it too.
Has any one read “the True History of Chocolate”?
ciao

Oh no! My Agustus!

Oh no! My Agustus!
January 15, 2005
2:30 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Good read [:)] Also check out The Great Book of Chocolate by David Lebovitz. It’s a fairly new book, published by Ten Speed Press. It doesn’t contain nearly the wealth of information as the other books mentioned in this thread, but it is another fun read with some interesting tid bits of information.

July 21, 2005
8:06 pm
Masur
Stockholm, Sweden
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Just found David Lebovitz website with a bit of information about chocolate.
[url]http://www.davidlebovitz.com/[/url]

“Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos” (Maricel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
July 21, 2005
8:17 pm
legodude
Norway
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May 21, 2004
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On Lebovitz’ site there is a link to a shop in Barcelona called Cacao Sampaka. The pictures of the shop makes my mouth running with water. They also have a bar, 71% with cacao from venezuela. Is it a repackaged Chocovic? Next time I visit Barcelona, I know where to go! Perhaps there are some forum members here from Barcelona? Anyone who has been there?

"I`ve got lots of friends in San José. Do you know the way to San José?"
July 21, 2005
8:34 pm
Masur
Stockholm, Sweden
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I’ve never in Barcelona looking for chocolate.
[url="http://www.porcelana.se/70/spain.htm"]But the new seventypercent.com links library – evaluation version covers Barcelona![/url]

[url="http://www.spaingourmetour.com/staticFiles/SpainGT/PDFArticles/7617a4Xfed49b642dXY7ff9.pdf"]This is a link to a PDF-file describing Spanish chocolate masters.[/url]

“Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos” (Maricel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
July 21, 2005
11:03 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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14

I’ve seen this site several times before and have read various reviews of the shop. I think that the chocolate is indeed Chocovic, but of course, I could be wrong.

August 4, 2005
4:53 pm
seneca
USA
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May 22, 2005
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15

I definitely recommend the True History of Chocolate by Coe. Easily available and (v. likely) translated…

It’s a good primer on the natural and cultural history of cacao and a good read to boot!

http://bittersweetcafe.blogspot.com http://www.bittersweetcafe.com
August 5, 2005
11:41 pm
legodude
Norway
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May 21, 2004
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If you want to take a major bite into the “clue of chocolate and cacao”, I guess the titles The chocolate tree by Allen M. Young and The Genetic Diversity of Cacao and its Utilization by B. G. D. Bartley will be quite palatable. They can be found on Amazon.com.

Knowledge though, comes at a price..

"I`ve got lots of friends in San José. Do you know the way to San José?"
August 7, 2005
7:20 pm
seneca
USA
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May 22, 2005
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Last time I checked The Chocolate Tree was out of print, but I’d also give it a thumbs-up, especially if you’re interested in the deeper biological issues of Theobroma. It’s a slightly dry read, but worth the time. Incidentally, Scharffen Berger has done a couple small runs of a “Finca Lapa Roja” bar made with cacao from the farm where Young did much of his research in Costa Rica. Very tasty if you can get your hands on one…

http://bittersweetcafe.blogspot.com http://www.bittersweetcafe.com
August 8, 2005
2:55 pm
le noir irlande
Ireland
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August 4, 2005
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I can thoroughly recommend ‘The Book of Chocolate’ by John Feltwell. This book is actually a translation from the French, and is published by Flammarion. Large format, quite expensive (€35), but lovely layout and stunning pictures. Full of useful and interesting information, and smooth and flavourful as a top 70%!

August 9, 2005
1:54 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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19

How much of this book is devoted to recipes? I have been considering buying this, but if most of it is comprised of recipes, then I may reconsider.

August 9, 2005
10:20 am
le noir irlande
Ireland
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August 4, 2005
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20

Montegrano,

There are some recipes at the back of this book, but not that many. The bulk of the book concerns the history, cultivation and manufacture of cocao/chocolate, profiles of prestigious chocolate houses and tasting. There are lots of glossy photographs, but I think this serves to give a colourful and evocative flavour of the whole subject.