3 Jan 2014: The Forum is currently in read-only made while we update to a new version of the Seventy% website and forum.

The forum will be back with a faster, simplified and up to date website in the next two months.

Please consider registering
guest

Log In

Lost password?
Advanced Search:

— Forum Scope —



— Match —



— Forum Options —




Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

The forums are currently locked and only available for read only access
Topic RSS
do women eat more chocolate?
April 22, 2005
7:15 pm
truffles
United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
April 22, 2005
Offline

Hi everyone, I’m new to this site. Very excited about all the information and will be passing the web address to friends. I am a mature student just about to complete my access course, about to start university to do a occupational therapy degree. I have to do a research project and my project to research, what I know best, you guest it, Chocolate. I would like to find out if women eat more chocolate than men, I am going to do a questionaire, but also need some other similar research to back up mine. Can anyone help? Anyone know someone who has already asked this question and found some interesting results[?] I know I’m new to the forum and feel a bit cheeky, but this is such an exicting subject for research I would truly appreciate some feedback from people who know their chocolate.[:I]

April 22, 2005
11:33 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline

Well, some women “crave” chocolate more than men it seems, especially during PMS. Since PMS involves mood swings, magnesium deficiency, low blood sugar, headaches, fatigue, etc., chocolate has many chemical properties that combat such symptoms. For example, it has been suggested that magnesium aids in headache relief and blood sugar levels, and of course, the phenylethylalamine and theobromine elevate one’s mood and energy level. In general, women typically crave sweeter foods, whereas men tend to lean towards more savory foods. But, as a side note, you know what food is craved equally by both sexes? Ice cream.

April 23, 2005
2:36 pm
alex_h
Member
Forum Posts: 1170
Member Since:
April 29, 2004
Offline

i’ve heard the quantities of magnesium in chocolate are too low to alleviate a deficiency, e.g., during PMS.

April 23, 2005
4:18 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline

Actually, chocolate does contain a relatively high amount of magnesium. Per 100g of chocolate there is 100mg of magnesium (25% DV), BUT in 100g of cocoa powder there is 520mg of magnesium! So gram-for-gram, one is getting more magnesium in the cocoa powder than in the chocolate bar, obviously. While it’s true that 100g of chocolate certainly might be a lot to ingest, allow me to note that the craving for chocolate doesn’t always imply that a bar must be consumed, i.e. the combined cocoa butter and cocoa liquor. But since the body needs and “craves” the magnesium, and because most people consume chocolate in bar format, the association and desire to eat a bar exists. If women would drink a cup of hot cocoa, their craving would be much better alleviated, but of course, the textural experience of the cocoa butter is more satisfying as a direct soothing agent. It’s all in the matter of delivery.

April 26, 2005
6:31 pm
truffles
United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
April 22, 2005
Offline

Thanks. You guys sure know youre chocolate facts. Interesting comment about icecream. I agree that hot chocolate is no subsitute for the real thing, the taste and texture very important in satisfying the desire. I think I might have a look at classical conditioning, when children get rewarded or a treat of chocolate given after a fall, to make it better for example or for doing something well etc. Did you guys experience this in childhood and now eat chocolate for the comfort, reward feeling? I love chocolate and relate to the PMS theories, as do many females. I am really enjoying this research project, feel sure I will need plenty of chocolate to keep me going through the late nights of work. Will be sampling some of your recomendations. Many thanks

April 26, 2005
6:34 pm
truffles
United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
April 22, 2005
Offline

P.s Just how much chocolate do you guys consume in your search for the best? Just curious!

April 26, 2005
6:55 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 308
Member Since:
March 17, 2005
Offline

In my experience there was no any chocolate conditioning in childhood – mine or anyone i know of for a long time, I don’t think parents even now so consistently unsensible and children so spoiled. With me it’s an acquired taste, i seems never liked sweet or milky chocolates, but I know people who only go for white or milk chocs.
And quest for the better never stops! Thanks god taste (and maybe manufacturing process) evolves all the time, otherwise i’d die craving new stuff all the time, most of the chocolate been tasted .

April 27, 2005
5:16 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline

In my search for the best, I eat as much as necessary. However, I find it difficult to classify a chocolate as the “best,” but rather I call it “different,” i.e. I appreciate each chocolate for what it is. But I do have my favorites, though, and of course, finding one’s favorites happens by tasting a lot. But that’s the fun part anyway.

I was never conditioned with chocolate or with anything as a child. My parents never deprived me of good quality food, but rather they just appropriated it at certain times, and since this was the way things always were, I didn’t think much of it. I knew I would be getting what I wanted in the end, but the exact time that I would be able to enjoy it was always unknown. It was the excitment and anticipation that never ruined the experience of good food.

As a side note for you, truffles, chocolate is a great energy source. It’s absorbed slowly into the bloodstream and so its calories are extended over a greater period of time. Hence, it’s low on the glycemic index and is actually very suitable for diabetics. If you do any kind of physical activity, conduct your own experiment over a time span of several weeks. Before exercise/workouts, eat some chocolate and see how your energy level compares to that when chocolate was not consumed before exercise/workouts. You might be surprised.

April 27, 2005
11:47 am
alex_h
Member
Forum Posts: 1170
Member Since:
April 29, 2004
Offline

truff,
i can in fact recall a sort of “conditioning” in childhood. but i always thought of it as me conditioning my parents to give me what i wanted ;)
the amounts of chocolate i eat? well, right now i’d say i’ve completed my search for excellence and my intake is leveling off due to that. i’d say about around 400g a week, give or take.

April 27, 2005
7:09 pm
truffles
United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 4
Member Since:
April 22, 2005
Offline
10

love your postings, made me chuckle. Thanks for your memories of conditioning, interesting. I apreciate each chocolate and also have my favourites too. I have done a very interesting assignment on diabetes, chocolate has so many benefits, as I keep reminding my friends. Now, my next ask is, wait for it, do you recomend Domori-Grandes Cacaos 120g mini bars as a good starting point to introduce myself to some finer delights? I feel sure it will aid my research…

April 27, 2005
10:13 pm
alex_h
Member
Forum Posts: 1170
Member Since:
April 29, 2004
Offline
11

:)
hmm, hard to say where to start, but u can do no wrong with domori’s grandes cacaos. that gives u five different single bean chocolates to compare spanning criollo, trinitario and nacional forastero. on second thought i’m not sure about the criollo bit, but certainly the other two. and they are definitively fine delights. check out this for starters too>
http://www.seventypercent.com/…..hTerms=cru

so many ways to go about discovering all the chocolates out there. compare makers, beans, percentages, regions, oh there’s no end.

April 27, 2005
11:29 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 308
Member Since:
March 17, 2005
Offline
12

Alex, as always, completely to the point.
Depends who funds the research ;) By all means, it’s one of the best and quite distinctive. But you’ve got to do so much vertical (and others as well) tastings for your research…

April 28, 2005
8:55 am
green
Trondheim, Norway
Member
Forum Posts: 103
Member Since:
November 19, 2004
Offline
13

truffles: i think grandes cacaos would be a nice “intro”. i’m a newbee myself, and haven’t tried too much. allthough i like every chocolate i taste, i do not have a reffined enough palate to “separate” all the different flavors in a bar. in my opinion this was easier in the grandes cacaos squares. they just taste so much! perhaps the chocolates will be better with more experience, but i think it was a great introduction to “what to look for”. (I would also reccomend it to sceptics who don’t think there is difference in chocolates, because they are all from the same producer and all taste so extremely different.)
good luck!

April 28, 2005
9:21 am
green
Trondheim, Norway
Member
Forum Posts: 103
Member Since:
November 19, 2004
Offline
14

btw, concerning magnesium…
After thinking about what could be better with my health, I found out all my symptoms indicated too little magnesium, (many people have too little of it…). So I tried taking some for a while, but it actually made me worse. A couple of months later I tried again. This time it didn’t make me worse, but not better either, and nothing happened when I stopped taking it either. So my conclusion is: I don’t need more magnesium.

My dieting has relieved me off hormonal hunger (= cravings), but still I crave chocolate, so there must still be something in cocoa my body thinks it needs. I wonder what it could be.
I have also noticed that (except from the comforting aspect of eating a chocolate bar), I don’t have more cravings during PMS than regular.

April 28, 2005
12:58 pm
Sebastian
Member
Forum Posts: 430
Member Since:
September 30, 2004
Offline
15

The comfort food aspect of chocolate shouldn’t be dismissed. Every space shuttle flight that has ever gone up has included chocolate. I forget how much it costs to send 1 lb of extra weight into space, but it’s very, very, very expensive. They’re not just bringing chocolate up because someone had room in his duffle..it’s brought along because when they’re so far from home, in such a high tension situation, there’s something to be said about having something that’s inherently so comforting to meet psychological needs.

April 28, 2005
1:07 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 308
Member Since:
March 17, 2005
Offline
16

And as far as i’m aware, chocolate is the only food source,containing chemichals satisfying “the pleasure centre” in the brian, plainly speaking. Others are sex, drugs and so on…

April 28, 2005
4:02 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline
17

This is true for any food, really, and not just chocolate. Depending on person, of course, different foods have different effects on the chemical activities within people. So if one consumes a food that he enjoys a lot, then he’s obviously going to derive more pleasure from it than if he were to eat something else. So, for example, a Philly Steak and Cheese sandwich can cause the same reactions that chocolate could. It just so happens that chocolate possesses an inherently natural ability to release these chemicals more readily. But, at any rate, chemicals such as serotonin and endorphins are released easier by such pleasure foods, esepcially ones that are high in fat. It just so happens that chocolate, with its combined characteristics of: hight fat content, higher levels of phenylethylamine, and its slow release into the bloodstream, is the most widely recognized “cure” or “craved” food.

April 28, 2005
4:17 pm
alex_h
Member
Forum Posts: 1170
Member Since:
April 29, 2004
Offline
18

ellie, what do u mean by horizontal and vertical tasting? i think i get what u mean, but am not quite sure. and if u find any funding please tell me! ;)
don’t need any drugs with enough domori around fer sure. can’t leave out the rock n roll and the other thing though ;=)what a motto: sex, domori and rock n roll!!!!
sebastian, great story :D
and as far as i know, soldiers in the field and expeditions to wherever have always included chocolate in their rations and emergency packs.
monte, pizza and pasta ain’t bad either. i need to move to italy some day :D i can just about see that happening.

April 28, 2005
4:22 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline
19

You also might find it interesting that physical activity can increase serotonin and endorphin levels. During strenuous activity, the body’s natural stress response system kicks in to facilitate accommodation of increased physical demands. Frequency of this behavior leads to the ability for the body to learn how to respond quickly and how to handle stress without the individual actually feeling “stressed.” Therefore, one will ultimately experience a reduction in cravings and an increase in overall mood.

Besides, chocolate is a calorie dense food, and for its weight and size, its the perfect energy booster and life sustainable food. It’s small, convenient, and lightweight.

Domori’s Grandes Cacao assortment is definitely a good place to start. His other lines might be too challenging or too different to start out with. The flavors are complex, though, so don’t be intimidated. Another chocolate I recommend to you is Cluizel Amer Brut 72%, which is essentially among the most chocolaty of all chocolate. It has such a neutral and pleasing flavor that practically screams cacao.

April 28, 2005
5:20 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline
20

Horizontal and vertical tastings are terms used in the wine industry. A horizontal tasting is when you taste wines from the same vintage, and then you can impose other limitations later on, such as tasting from different wineries. It’s a good method to discern which winery had a more successful crop output in a certain year. Vertical tastings involve different vintages, but the wines comes from the same winery. If you were to do this with chocolate, you would taste all Gran Couvas from each year, e.g. 2001, 2002, 2003, et al. Basically, in horizontal tastings you learn more about different wineries, whereas in vertical tastings, you learn more about differences in vintages.