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dramatic temperatures
August 5, 2006
8:57 am
Everjean
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August 5, 2006
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hi chocolate lovers

what is the effect of keeping chocolate stored at about 30 degrees (celsius) for some weeks?

I just recently bought an exquisite collection of some 20 bars (Cluizel, Amadei, Valrona, …) and I usually just store them in a cupboard. In Belgium most of the time it’s like 20 degrees.
However… the last weeks we suffered from a serious heatwave and I stood watching the temperature getting at 30 degrees in the cupboard all the time!
I haven’t opened yet the delicious goods, but what should I expect to get? I feel so bad about it, but since it are my first ‘Premier Cru de plantation’ I have no reference yet as to what it’s like in a normal state.

Will the texture have changed? will it have melt? or… is 30 degrees not that disastrous?

EJ

August 5, 2006
12:03 pm
Sebastian
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September 30, 2004
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It will melt and bloom. It’s not goin to destroy the product, but it will make it unsightly and difficult to handle. You should really retemper it if you plan to eat it straight up, but you don’ t have to. Better to wrap them tightly in a sealed container/bag/etc and put them in the ‘fridge or freezer until the heat wave passes.

August 6, 2006
9:39 am
Everjean
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August 5, 2006
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Hi Sebastian,
thanx for all the info, I feel a little reassured, and learned a few things :)

Uptill now I really thought putting the chocolate in the fridge would break its structure or so, that’s why I didn’t dare to put in a (very) cold zone. But of course you can always let it heat up at room temperature before consuming it.

Mostly I eat pure bars straight up, I really enjoy tasting al the fine ‘nuances’ in every different bar. So you suggest to re-melt it first before I eat it? I’ll maybe try that with one of the bars, why not? :)

thx !
EJ

Always taste from the dark side of life

August 6, 2006
4:07 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
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July 5, 2006
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Hey Everjean,
You mentioned that will just melt back down the chocolate then eat it when it sets, I’m guessing? The only thing is, is that if youd do not “Temper” The chocolate it will actually come out worse than it already is, in appearance and texture. Do you know how to “Temper” chocolate?
Here is a link if not….hope all goes well….

http://www.chocolateguild.com/page3.html

Robert

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
August 6, 2006
4:09 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
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July 5, 2006
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There is also a chance that the bloom isn’t too bad. Look for white streaks or blotches on the chocolate…the chocolate should be pure brown to Dark Brown…NO WHITE! so just check it first…

Robert

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
August 6, 2006
7:05 pm
erikos
New York, USA
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July 13, 2006
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The texture of the chocolate shouldn’t have changed. Chocolate will go out of temper though if the temperature goes to about 34 or 35, as that is when the beta crystals will melt.
Beta crystals are what you gain from the cocoa butter when you temper chocolate.

August 6, 2006
9:21 pm
Everjean
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August 5, 2006
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hi chocoholics!
thanx for all this info, especially thank you aguynamedrobert!
I will definitley have to look for the white streaks… for which I’m a little afraid :s

I’ve been a true heavy dark chocolate freak for years (at which my friends often poke fun :) ). I’ve visited shops in Paris and Italy for some years at occasions, in search for the purest bars possible. But only recently in Barcelona & especially Stockholm I found and bought some very special ones from ao. Cluizel and Valrohna.

So you’ll understand that I’m a little nervous and afraid to discover that my little brown treasure will not be as shiny anymore. We’ll see, and open them one by one at a time.

I’m still learning a lot, and I’m glad to have posted my question (which I thought was a little silly at first), because I learn a lot
(especially the myth of putting them in the fridge would harm them!)

All this will welp me to enjoy even more.
thank you, glad I found some dark likeminds here on 70percent!

EverJean

ps: my guess that supposed that there are white streaks, putting them in the fridge is of no use anymore. I’ll try to temper one anyhow, for the fun of alchemy :)

August 15, 2006
1:56 pm
t.fadrus
Austria
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June 10, 2006
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Hi Everjean.

I had tremendous problems with bloom on my stashed chocolate bars. The temperature in my storage room got well over 28 degrees celsius (about 84°F) at times and after some bars were completely ruined from bloom I bought a little wine fridge.

I shot some photos of a pralus bar that fell prey to the vicious sugar bloom.
[url="http://www.schokologie.com/img/vanuatu-sugarbloom01.jpg"]sugarbloom01[/url]
[url="http://www.schokologie.com/img/vanuatu-sugarbloom02.jpg"]sugarbloom02[/url]

www.schokologie.com << visit my blog
August 16, 2006
12:27 am
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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March 17, 2005
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Looks like fat bloom, Fardus, imho

August 16, 2006
12:09 pm
t.fadrus
Austria
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Member Since:
June 10, 2006
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10

quote:


Originally posted by ellie

Looks like fat bloom, Fardus, imho


Oh does it? Thanks ellie for pointing this out, as I was never really certain. Until now I always thought fat bloom manifests in shiny swirls and sugar bloom in white crystals. Could someone with a lot of chocolate expertise shed some more light on this?

www.schokologie.com << visit my blog
August 16, 2006
4:12 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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March 17, 2005
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11

Sugar bloom I’ve seen was more irregular, sparkly sharper tiny crystals on the surface. It does appear with evaporating condensation, or moisture exposure. Chocolate itself went much paler and crumbly.
Fat bloom caused by temperature flucs. more uniform, filmy, could be in patches or swirls and has fatty, creamy feel when rubing it off.
Could always lick it, if in doubt – taste will tell all ;)

August 16, 2006
11:44 pm
Sebastian
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September 30, 2004
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12

Fat bloom can absolutely affect the texture of the chocolate. A little bit of bloom and you probably won’t notice anything, howver if you’ve lots of bloom, the affect on chocolate’s texture can be noticed immediately. It’s hard to tell from a photo what type of bloom you have. if you run your finger across the top of the grey material and it leaves your finger feeling greasy, it’s fat bloom. if you run your finger across it and the ‘dust’ brushes off, leaving a good solid brown underneath it w/o your finger feeling greasy, it’s a good bet its sugar bloom..

August 17, 2006
1:12 am
t.fadrus
Austria
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June 10, 2006
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13

Thanks for all the info.

I can’t remember it being greasy. I haven’t got the pictured bar any more. Simply scraping the bloom off made it fairly edible again. From what I recall it was dry, dusty and coarse. So I still guess it was sugar bloom in this case.

I think I never really had a bar afflicted with severe fat bloom. Some of them have very faint shiny swirls on the bottom side. I always assumed this to be slight fat bloom. Is this the case or is it a natural occurrence inherent in the chocolate production process?

Cheers,
Thomas

www.schokologie.com << visit my blog
August 17, 2006
11:32 am
Sebastian
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September 30, 2004
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14

Again, hard to say w/o seeing/touching them, but that sounds fairly like it’s a remnant of the depositing process

August 31, 2006
11:44 am
Everjean
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Forum Posts: 7
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August 5, 2006
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15

Hi there again,

in the meantime I’ve opened and tasted some of the bars I had, and almost all of them had indeed litlle les or more ‘bloom’ on them. Though sometimes it felt that taste was not that badly affected, structure definitly was, which is of course half the pleasure wasted.
Anyway, the (not so) dramatic meltdown resulted in a lot new knowledge I gathered over here!

thx Sebastian and Ellie. Now I’ve even learned about fat bloom and sugar bloom, I feel I’m truly becoming an expert ;)

T.Fadrus, what chocolate was that?

I’m keeping my new chocolate bars in the fridge from now on, and get them out some time before eating them, to let them get the right temperature just like a wine. And no worries no more, here in Belgium temperature is down at 15… goodbye summer :(
Hello chocolate.

August 31, 2006
11:06 pm
t.fadrus
Austria
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Forum Posts: 19
Member Since:
June 10, 2006
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16

quote:


Originally posted by Everjean

T.Fadrus, what chocolate was that?


That was one of the much talked about Pralus Vanuatu bars.

If you want to know more about it i recommend this thread:
[url]http://www.seventypercent.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=800[/url]

www.schokologie.com << visit my blog