A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
How much sugar? / Health benefits
Avatar
gap
Melbourne, Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 199
Member Since:
October 20, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
March 27, 2008 - 5:33 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

A question for the more scientific minded in our community.

I was given a Cadbury Easter Bunny over the weekend and happened to glance at the nutritional information which is standardised in Australia as per 100g. The Cadbury milk Easter Bunny was 30% cocoa solids and 24% milk solids.

My question is: does this mean that the bunny is 46% sugar? (100% - 30% - 24%) ie., the same amount of sugar as 54% dark chocolate?

It just seems that we're constantly told how good dark chocolate is for us, yet one of the most common dark chocolates for mass consumption here in Australia is probably (and I am guessing based on 54% Callebaut being widely used and 54% Haigh's dark chocolate being a premium brand here) only 54%. There doesn't seem to be a lot of health benefit of eating the 54% dark over the Cadbury milk.

Am I missing something? [?]

Avatar
Eshra
Southgate, USA
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 178
Member Since:
February 14, 2006
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
March 27, 2008 - 10:54 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Some of those milk solids may be sugars. Milk has a moderate amount of natural sugar in and of itself. I doubt they strip it out before drying it out. I would say at least 8% is milk sugars...

Sean

Avatar
Domenico
Budapest, Hungary
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 81
Member Since:
December 12, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
March 27, 2008 - 12:39 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

You are right, no miss here. 54% chocolate means eating 46% sugar, more precisely, saccharose (or the same in American scientific slang, sucrose). Beet (or cane) sugar. The health benefits of dark chocolate have been tested on patients eating 70 and 80% dark chocolate.

Avatar
gap
Melbourne, Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 199
Member Since:
October 20, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
March 27, 2008 - 9:38 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks for the responses

Avatar
oz_choc
Kandos, Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 98
Member Since:
January 10, 2006
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
March 28, 2008 - 2:43 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Hi gap,

Another important health consideration relates specifically to the fact that milk chocolate contains milk solids.

One of the main reasons that dark chocolate is considered good for you is because it is an outstandingly rich source of antioxidants. But antioxidants bind very effectively to proteins (this is how tannins produce an astringent sensation in your mouth: they "complex" with the proteins in your saliva, making your mouth feel dry and puckery).

Milk solids provide a rich source of protein. Hence, the antioxidants in milk chocolate tend to bind to the proteins in the milk solids, thus changing the structure of the chemicals involved, and making the antioxidants unavailable to your system. So, you don't get much (if any) benefit from antioxidants if you eat chocolate in the presence of milk. This includes not only "milk chocolate", but also chocolate drinks made with milk, etc.

According to one study (linked below), the levels of antioxidants in subjects' blood "increased significantly after consumption of dark chocolate alone", but "there was no significant change" in antioxidant levels in the subjects' blood "over the same period after ingestion of milk chocolate alone or of dark chocolate with milk"

From: "Plasma antioxidants from chocolate - Dark chocolate may offer its consumers health benefits the milk variety cannot match."
URL (PDF doc):
http://www.scienceinschool.org.....ni2003.pdf

Sam

Avatar
gap
Melbourne, Australia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 199
Member Since:
October 20, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
March 28, 2008 - 5:01 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks Sam - I thought I must be missing something along the way and that provides a good explanation of it.

Avatar
chenddyna
Bangalore, India
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 25
Member Since:
April 16, 2005
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
May 21, 2008 - 12:05 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

HI has any one tried making chocolates with high protein ingredients and creating a good health bar. I have been trying with soya and nuts added to it, and it tastes pretty good. chenddyna

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 89

Currently Online:
19 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Hans-Peter Rot: 1462

alex_h: 1170

Martin Christy: 614

Masur: 592

Sebastian: 430

Lone Ly: 397

Newest Members:

Kellie Lin Knott

ignaciochan

RT

Martin Test_1

Martin Test

graham

Forum Stats:

Groups: 7

Forums: 26

Topics: 1825

Posts: 10538

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1

Members: 5100

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Administrators: Seventy%

How much sugar? / Health benefits | General Discussions | Forum