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natural flavor - what is it?
May 11, 2004
5:33 pm
alex_h
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does anyone know? the slitti i ordered has it listed under ingredients.

is it artificial? if so, what other artificial ingredients are parading under mysterious names out there?

i read on a site (i think theobroma posted it in one of his topics) that bourbon vanilla is made using alcohol? what's up with that?

since i like the simplest ingredients in my chocolate i am curious as to what all goes into chocolate, declared or undeclared...

May 11, 2004
11:21 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Good question. If you look on the box of Domori Puro, it says "100% flavor cocoa," which is actually a bit misleading as well, but we all know that Domori doesn't use any artificial flavorings. I believe that natural flavor simply refers to the flavor given by the natural ingredients, i.e. cocoa beans and vanilla, used in the bars. Either Slitti was just trying to be too eloquent in the descriptions, or the translated version in Italian has a different, more direct meaning than in English.

May 11, 2004
11:29 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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I forgot this in the last post. Bourbon vanilla simply refers to the geographical region of the bean and not the alcohol; it's grown in Madagascar, as is 80% of the world's vanilla. There's also Tahitian vanilla and Mexican vanilla, each having their own characteristic flavor, but we won't delve into that now.

May 12, 2004
10:00 am
alex_h
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here's the response i got from slitti yesterday:

Thank you for your e-mail.

Natural Flavours = VANILLA FLAVOUR

We remain at your disposal for any question.

Best regards,
SLITTI CHOCOLATE.

now i went ahead and researched a bit on the web and found out that natural flavors are not what they appear to be (one definition: A product in which all components come from natural sources). natural means they are derived from nature. this could be anything from the bark of a tree to who knows what. but natural vanilla flavor does not necessarily have to contain any vanilla at all.

unfortunately the info i found on the web is mainly in german. one site is http://www.hydrosol.de/g/prod-.....arom-g.htm for anyone who wants to check it out. there is much irritation on the german organic products market about these ingredients. they are usually used to mask off tastes or enhance flavor. often they don't even contain any of the original taste or flavor they represent, e.g. strawberry natural flavor has nothing to do with strawberries i've heard.

i am seriously unhappy about this! and i am really not pleased with the product i got from slitti.

monte,
thanks for the info on bourbon vanilla. i thought as much, but was not quite sure.

May 12, 2004
10:44 pm
Lone Ly
Oslo, Norway
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Do you know why Slitti calls it natural flavors instead of simply calling it vanilla? I just checked my Amedei bars. It says: Emulsifiers: soja lecithin, vanilla. I don't know if Slitti adds something different.

"Man cannot live by chocolate alone - but woman can." (Unknown)
May 13, 2004
3:44 pm
alex_h
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slitti says vanilla flavor. my guess is that it is called natural flavor to give consumers the impression they are getting something good. instead you get an ingredient that is produced in a lab. and from what i hear, very few know exactly what happens in these food labs.

November 15, 2004
1:56 pm
Polarbear
Tromsø, Norway
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quote:


Originally posted by LoneLy

Do you know why Slitti calls it natural flavors instead of simply calling it vanilla?

Probably because it isn't vanilla? [}:)] I once asked the same question in a store regarding a bar with "vanilla aroma". I didn't buy it...(don't even remember the name...)

***
My name is Polarbear and I am a chocoholic...

*** My name is Polarbear and I am a chocoholic...
November 16, 2004
9:41 am
Lone Ly
Oslo, Norway
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What is for sure is that most Slitti bars taste a bit plastic-like. I presume some artificial additives are to be blamed.

Chocolate is cheaper than therapy and you don't need an appointment.

"Man cannot live by chocolate alone - but woman can." (Unknown)
November 16, 2004
11:54 pm
Sebastian
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I wouldn't come down too hard on Slitti just yet. Different companies read the regs differently, and it may well be that they're using pure vanilla, vanilla sugar, vanilla extract- something that is derived from or is a pure extract of vanilla. It could be that doing it this way is mose amenable to export in a number of countries, as many countries have different labelling requirements, and doing it this way makes it easier on their labelling and inventory management (only have to have one label, and the product can go to a number of countries. the alternative would be to wrap the same product in a number of different wrappers, and then have to manage that single product as essentially a number of distinct products... very difficult). Or it could be that they're using a natural flavor that isn't derived from vanilla at all, but tastes like vanilla.

Personally, I'm of the opinion that it'd be a pure vanilla flavor. I'd find it hard to believe that they'd be using anything but.

They seemed to be pretty responsive to the first email that was sent - you might want to follow up with a second email to them asking politely for clarification 8-)

November 17, 2004
8:38 am
alex_h
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i never saw it that way before, sebastian. good point!
and i guess i did come down a bit hard on slitti (i still don't really care for the taste), but in my emails to them i was always polite. i guess i just kinda went overboard here because i felt a little gipped for my money.
i did in fact send them a second email asking for clarification. when no reply came (i think even after a second query) i figured they didn't care to go any deeper on the subject so as not to be outed as vanillin users.
in the end, this whole labeling business is just one big pain ;-)
i still haven't had time to read up on german labels. but from what i've gone over i can see a big, confusing debate. nothing is as it seems.

November 18, 2004
4:50 pm
Sebastian
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yup, there's still a lot of smoke and mirrors when it comes to flavors, some countries are much more developed in their legislation than others. if it says natural flavor on their label, you can be really pretty sure it's not vanillin, however. it may not be true blue vanilla (but then again it may very well be..), but it's probably not vanillin.

Since many places make their money on flavor (isn't that what it all really boils down to, after all?) most are really very hesitant to tell you exactly what it is, for fear that someone will copy them and essentially devalue their brand. You may not get a response at all, but if i had to guess, i'd say they're using vanilla..

natural flavor - what is it? | General Discussions | Forum