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Quality chocolate for diabetics
September 21, 2004
3:31 pm
chocolatero
london
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I don;t think there is any limit on the 100%, except in
the sense that it is a fat product. Cocoa beans in their natural state contain between 45 and 55% of cocoa butter; so does the 100%.
Fat intake usually has to be watched for diabtetics too as they are at much higher risk of heart problems (one of the impact of diabetes)

We stock a very nice 100% from carenero superior which has been conched for longer and therefore has a milder taste.
regards
Chocolatero

September 21, 2004
11:39 pm
Lone Ly
Oslo, Norway
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I agree that your 100% bar is rather good, but as with most other 100% bars it takes a woman to eat it - er, I mean, most people don't really enjoy these bars as chocolate. Domori is so far unbeatable in terms of making eatable 100% bar(s - rhyming accidentally) - at least imo. Their Puro, 100% and the one I should mention no more (the Ocumare 61/San José) are quite different from the best of the rest of 100%.

"Man cannot live by chocolate alone - but woman can." (Unknown)

"Man cannot live by chocolate alone - but woman can." (Unknown)
September 24, 2004
10:24 am
jamesfairfax
Yoirk, United Kingdom
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Dear All,

Here is the 'Diabetic Information' page from our website. I hope it clarifies things a little for you....

Diabetic Chocolate Information

For far too long people suffering with diabetes have not been able to enjoy the delights of luxurious Belgian chocolates. Thankfully, there is no longer any need to compromise on taste if you want to eat sugar-free chocolate!

One of the major triumphs of late has been the development of a group of natural sweeteners known as polyols. One of these sweeteners, maltitol, which is made from maltose, a naturally-occurring sugar found in starch, has become the main sugar-alternative for chocolate, and is used in all of our chocolate products.

The major advantage of maltitol is that it is a very stable agent with a high melting point, thereby making it perfect for fantastic tasting chocolate. In fact, it tastes as sweet as sugar but has significantly fewer calories (less than 2.5 calories per gram) and does not cause tooth decay. It is also thought to be healthier for the stomach and intestines. Another benefit of using maltitol in low calorie chocolate is that it can be used as a replacement for fat as it naturally gives the chocolate a rich and creamy texture. Therefore, it is not just more suitable for diabetics, but also those looking for a healthier range of chocolate that do not wish to compromise on that all important factor – taste!

Handmade Chocolate Ingredients: Maltitol, Cocoa Butter, Whole Milk Powder, Cocoa Mass, Vegetable Oil, Whey Powder, Inulin, Soy Lecithin, Natural Vanilla, Shredded Coconut, Dehydrated Strawberries, Flavouring: Coffee, Cointreau, Mandarine Napoleon, Orange Aroma, Sultana, Almond, Hazelnut.

Dark Chocolate Ingredients: Maltitol, Cocoa Mass, Cocoa Butter, Soya Lecithin, Natural Vanilla

Milk Chocolate Ingredients: Maltitol, Cocoa Butter, Milk Powder, Cocoa Mass, Butter Oil, Soya Lecithin, Natural Vanilla

White Chocolate Ingredients: Maltitol, Cocoa Butter, Milk Powder, Butter Oil, Soya Lecithin, Natural Vanilla

Typical Nutritional Information per 100g...
Energy 488 Kcal, 2041 Kj, Protein 6.4g, Carbs 43.7g of which Polyols 34.1g, of which Sugars 7.4g, of which Lactose 6.7g, Fat 38.9g of which Saturates 22.1g, Fibres 6.7g, Sodium 84mg.

Many thanks,

Kind Regards,

James
http://www.diabetic-chocolate.co.uk

Kind Regards, James www.diabetic-chocolate.co.uk
September 24, 2004
12:54 pm
Lone Ly
Oslo, Norway
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quote:


Originally posted by jamesfairfax

For far too long people suffering with diabetes have not been able to enjoy the delights of luxurious Belgian chocolates.

Just for your information, the term 'luxurious Belgian chocolates' is associated with the kind of chocolate that is not really good - ie. mass produced, artificial ingredients, etc. etc. Even the respected Belgian chocolatier Pierre Marcolini says Belgian chocolate is no good ...

It's not that chocolates are a substitute for love. Love is a substitute for chocolate. Chocolate is, let's face it, far more reliable than a man.
Miranda Ingram

"Man cannot live by chocolate alone - but woman can." (Unknown)
September 24, 2004
4:08 pm
jamesfairfax
Yoirk, United Kingdom
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Many thanks for the information! I can assure you that our chocolates certainly are luxurious and of a very high quality. Sounds like you have read a lot of books about it though, if nothing else! We make them ourselves, so none of this mass produced stuff.

quote:


Originally posted by LoneLy

quote:

Originally posted by jamesfairfax

For far too long people suffering with diabetes have not been able to enjoy the delights of luxurious Belgian chocolates.

Just for your information, the term 'luxurious Belgian chocolates' is associated with the kind of chocolate that is not really good - ie. mass produced, artificial ingredients, etc. etc. Even the respected Belgian chocolatier Pierre Marcolini says Belgian chocolate is no good ...

It's not that chocolates are a substitute for love. Love is a substitute for chocolate. Chocolate is, let's face it, far more reliable than a man.
Miranda Ingram


Kind Regards,

James
http://www.diabetic-chocolate.co.uk

Kind Regards, James www.diabetic-chocolate.co.uk
September 24, 2004
4:21 pm
chocolatero
london
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Would you be kind enough to let us know what couverture you use? As i assume you don't make from the beans?
Slightly surprised to see butter oil in your milk and white chocolate couverture...
Hve you considered making fresh chocolates with shorter shelf life that do not need to have a vegetable fat center? wouldn't that be better for diabetics?
On the "belgian chocolates", I am belgian and most of what you find here are purely products made for export that no one in Belgium would buy.... They are still some nice small producers in belgium but they tend not to export. In general anyway belgians like milk chocolate,parline and caramels as opposed to french who like ganaches more. I would say stay away from anything with long shelf life that uses cheap couveture like Callebaut regardless of where it is made or how it is labelled. Did you know that you can call belgian chocolates anything made from couverture made in belgium. As barry Calleuabt handle a siginficamt portion of the world's production, that can appy to hords of products, regardless of the quality...
Chocolatero

September 24, 2004
4:42 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Well, that's understandable, but since the chocolate isn't actually grown in Belgium (or France, Italy, or any other country), how fair is it to call it Belgian to begin with? The finished product might be Belgian, but the actual ingredients aren't. Just a random side note. Btw, at least butter oil isn't hydrogentaed vegetable fat, so I suppose that's one step up.

September 24, 2004
5:05 pm
chocolatero
london
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hydro veg fat used mostly in centres
other oils used in couverture
that's common and not really a step up.
yes, buy chocolate from Callebaut and make anything with it in anyplace in the world and you can call it belgian chocolate!!!
Same isseu for organic. Many people buy organic couverture and use it in an non organic way (other ingredients and processes) but call it organic chocolate!
sad world really but one can listen always to one truth: your palate!
chocolatero

September 25, 2004
3:16 am
Hans-Peter Rot
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Well then, you come across the dilemma of how you're defining "chocolate." Is chocolate the pure substance (i.e. cocoa mass), or the confection "chocolates," a common appellation used to designate anything made with chocolate. If you're referring to country of origin or country of maufacture, then it's an entirely different matter and one which must be taken into final consideration as well. However, this is not meant to be a big discussion [:)] People use terms and associations very loosely, and as a result, their claims are somewhat true but only to a certain extent.

September 25, 2004
11:15 am
jamesfairfax
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Interesting to read your comments. Montegrano you make some good points. The fact that it is sugar free chocolate means you can't have it all. Chocolatero you seem a little mis-lead. Only a small amount of vegetable oil is used in the centres. As we are an online mail order company it is not really feasible to make chocolates with a shorter shelf life.
I think that you would find that our selection of diabetic chocolate is of a distinctly higher quality than any other diabetic chocolate on the market and this is why it is proving so popular. Not only this, but the fact that it doesn't contain any added sugar means that is also popular with those on low sugar and low carb diets. If you are not keen on the concept of sugar free chocolate, for whatever reason, fair enough, but Maltitol has actually been proved to have a beneficial effect on the intestines.

Kind Regards,

James
http://www.diabetic-chocolate.co.uk

Kind Regards, James www.diabetic-chocolate.co.uk
September 30, 2004
1:25 pm
Sebastian
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Hoo boy. Let me preface this by saying I'm new to this place, and that I just wrote a sort of 101 primer on sugar free chocolates in the bar forum. I don't want to retype all that, but if you're interested in SF products, it might be a worthwhile read. There's a few misconceptions I've read here, allow me to address.

Fructose should never be labelled as sugar free. It is a sugar, no matter how you dice it - but is often consumed by diabetics as it has a low glycemic index (see above referred to post for definition). It's hard to use in chocolate, as it's hydroscopic, but can be done.

High intensity sweeteners are a class of materials that are *extremely* sweet. Most approved ones are not natural - they are halogenated materials (added cholorine/bromine molecules, specialty protein fractions, etc), and most frequently include aspartame, ace-k, and sucralose. There is a very vocal but not very scientifically based segment of people who are convinced that these tihngs are responsible for everything from the plague to boy bands and everything evil in between. Aspartame is made from an amino acid that folks with PKU lack the enzyme to metabolize, so they should not consume this. None of them, however, have been conclusively linked to any of the evils purported to them - if they were, they'd not be GRAS (a category of ingredients indicating food safety). Some of them have shown ill effects at consumption levels 10,000 x normal - but water has ill effects if you drink that much of it to - it will kill you. You have to use your head and consider consumption levels - these high intensity sweeteners are typically ~0.2% of a formulation - max. Many times they're an order of magnitude less.

There are certain 'natural' high intensity sweeteners - these may include things such as stevia and thaumatin. In the US they're not GRAS, in other countries they may be - check your local regs. They are not as effective in sweetening as the artificial ones, and have much more pronounced off flavors assciated with them.

Polyols (again, see previous post) are almost universally not natural, with the exception of erythritol. Reason being is that erythritol is produced by an enzymatic process, where as the others are chemically hydrogenated sugars.

Hope that helps

October 1, 2004
9:04 am
chocolatero
london
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Would you classify maltitol as a sugar?

October 1, 2004
11:13 am
Sebastian
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Nope. Maltitol is a sugar alcohol (polyol, or polyhydric alcohol) produced by the catalytic hydrogenation of maltose (which is a sugar). Maltitol has about 90% the sweetness of sucrose, a digestive tolerance of about 0.15g/kg body weight, and a glycemic index of approx. 35.

It's definately not a sugar, but does have one of the highest glycemic indices of all the sugar alcohols (meaning it's probably the least suited sugar substitute for diabetics).

October 1, 2004
11:29 am
chocolatero
london
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What is your view on the use of vegetable fat in "diabetic" chocolates, when -to my limited knowledge- people with daibetes also have to wathc their fat intake due to higher risk of heart problems?
regards

October 1, 2004
2:55 pm
Sebastian
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I think, in general - not just limited to diabetic consumption - that total fat content should indeed be watched. As you're aware, chocolates can be from 30-40% total fat content - usually mostly from cocoa butter, but also milk fat and in the EU it can be 5% other vegetable fat as well.

It's all about moderation 8-) I'm not a physician, and can't give you any recommendations, but I think in general the 'western' world eats too much fat and doesn't run enough.

Can sugar alcohol chocolate be a fit for a diabetic lifestyle? Sure - but it's my opinion that it's got to be just that - a lifestyle. It needs to fit with the other types of foods you eat, your particular health situation, your exercise routine, etc. As it should us all, not just diabetics.

October 6, 2004
3:11 pm
choca
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I must reply to chocolateros comments on Organic. there are some chocolatiers using organic chocolate and mixing it with other organic ingredients to produce a totally organic product .
There are indeed issues with some companies using part organic / part non organic , just as there are often organic products out there such as cocoa beans that are not certified . ( the whole subject of certification is a topic in itself ) . I would also question the means of production . Craftsman v muti-national ,
I agree on the taste issue

October 6, 2004
3:28 pm
choca
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i also need to comment on callebaut . yes they have a near monoply , they tried to rip of Artisans name and they do make some cheap products . There do have some good staff though and some of their products are of good quality.

October 6, 2004
3:32 pm
choca
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Do the people at "the diabetic chocolate company" really make everything themseleves . the way he is repeating statements makes me think these are made in Europe not by his own hands ?

October 14, 2004
1:05 am
Lone Ly
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quote:


Originally posted by choca

i also need to comment on callebaut . yes they have a near monoply , they tried to rip of Artisans name and they do make some cheap products . There do have some good staff though and some of their products are of good quality.


By chance I met a Callebaut representative the other day (he saw my bag from L'artisan), and according to him they did not at all try to rip of L'artisan's name, it was simply a mistake, they didn't research properly in advance - which he admitted was unprofessional. He even commented that L'artisan probably use their products as they use Valrhona in some of their bars. I told him I had been wondering about the same. I asked Chocolatero about this some weeks ago, but didn't get any answer. Would like to know, though.

It's not that chocolates are a substitute for love. Love is a substitute for chocolate. Chocolate is, let's face it, far more reliable than a man.
Miranda Ingram

"Man cannot live by chocolate alone - but woman can." (Unknown)
January 17, 2005
9:31 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
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Domori's 80% bars in the San Jose boxes are sweetened with fructose and are probably an ideal chocolate for diabetics. Since fructose does not require insulin for digestion and is broken down by enzymes in the bowels, its effect on the glycemic level is at a minimum. Indeed, a most worthy alternative to chocolates sweetened with sucrose.

Quality chocolate for diabetics | Page 2 | General Discussions | Forum