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Tasting Club
February 27, 2005
2:31 pm
green
Trondheim, Norway
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Forum Posts: 103
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November 19, 2004
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Can anyone tell me more (opinions, not the formal info allready on the site) about the tasting club? Like is it expensice compared to just buying the bars on you own?

And also, would it be an idea to have a "tasting note form" in a printer friendly version on the website? (I think it might make it easier for "greens" like me to learn.)

February 27, 2005
6:20 pm
Masur
Stockholm, Sweden
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August 6, 2006
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On this swedish chocolate website you can download a "tasting note form". Choose chokladprovning in the menu:
[url]http://www.chokladsajten.com/[/url]

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
February 27, 2005
9:46 pm
chocolatero
london
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September 5, 2004
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well we use a tasting sheet during our tastings and the 5 things we look at is

texture (e.g. smooth, fatty, grainy...)
for taste we use 4 criteria: intensity, length, complexity and disctinctiveness.
people sometimes spend too much time on it takes like this. etc, which is a lower level of abstraction than the criteria above
Also we hope that the above critera are MECE (mutually exclusive and
exhanstive together) .. or at least close to that

For example, let's try Manjari from Varhona

Texture is fine smooth and melts easily
It is very intense
short in taste (taste does not last very long)
Disctinctive with citrus/red fruit notes (high acidity)
Not very complex (one falvour dominates)

With this, I think you can map different chocolates and also identify the chararctristics of the choc you like on a higher abstract level.
Let me know if it helps
regards
chocolatero

March 17, 2005
1:34 am
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 308
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March 17, 2005
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Hi, i'm new here.Went to Pierre Marcolini tasting evening yesterday - quite good, they even try to mach some wines with chocolate, which is hard.Confirmed that to my taste theirs Grand Crus and Single origins bit too sweet, very surprising for Fleur de Cacao, 85%. And they say that in general they've got about 6% sugar regardless of cocoa content in the dark ones. Tasting was very informative though, without predjudice and all the questions answered honestly and intellegently. Chocolates are very distinctive. Wud go again anytime.[:)] And dear Chocolatero, I'd say the book idea is great.There is lots around chocolate, fresh and personal, upart from cocoa history repeats.

March 17, 2005
2:01 am
chocolatero
london
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September 5, 2004
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thanks
by the way check the link about callebaut/marcolini article on the forum posted by masur
... may tell you some more about their chocolate that they would
not immediately volunteer to say...
chocolatero

March 17, 2005
3:16 pm
Sebastian
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September 30, 2004
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Here are the categories I use. Note that many of them may not be meaningful unless you've trained (I had no idea what alkali was prior to coming here), and what I consider phenolic you may not (hence the reason it's important to develop a shared vocabulary when doing tastings, so you're hearing the same thing another is saying):
sweetness
caramalized
vanilla
vanillin
alkali
fudgy
milkiness
burnt
chocoalte/cocoa
sour
bitter
astringent
winey
raininy
roast
woody
nutty
burlap
earthy
green
straw
cardboard
citrus
smoky
hammy
phenolic
rubbery

March 17, 2005
3:39 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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Well, when some pieces are actually named after certain Valrhona chocolate, such as Manjari, I think it's pretty safe to assume that Valrhona was indeed used as the base chocolate. I'm just wondering, but has Marcolini actually denied using another brand's couverture?

March 17, 2005
4:55 pm
Martin Christy
London, United Kingdom
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July 31, 2006
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Manjari means 'garland of flowers' and is Hindu in origin. It can be a personal name. I don't think Valrhona have any particular rights to it.

Martin Christy
Editor
http://www.seventypercent.com

Martin Christy Editor www.seventypercent.com
March 18, 2005
10:13 am
chocolatero
london
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September 5, 2004
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well, if you look at their website under company
it says
"Pierre is one of only two Belgian chocolatiers ,and one of four in all of Europe, the title of chocolatier being bestowed solely upon those who make their own couverture, which is the name given to chocolate in its pure form. Many other chocolate makers buy it ready made and then fashion it into chocolates and pralines, but Pierre sources the bean himself from all around the world: Java in Indonesia, Ecuador, Venezuela, Madagascar and of course Mexico, from where chocolate originated."
the first point about the 2 in belgium and 4 in Europe is false and we know it all (bonnat, domori, amedie, pralus, chocovic, bernachon etc... Does Mr Marcolini forget them on purpose???)
the second part clearly implies that Pierre makes all his choco from beans.... and that is far from reality
and yes they did in the past deny to MArtin buying finished couverture.
it makes me very angry.
chocolatero

March 18, 2005
1:02 pm
Sebastian
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September 30, 2004
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10

It's carefully worded to not lie, but not say the truth either, probably. there's a world of difference between sourcing raw materials and putting them together. For his first statement, there is an organization that has specific entitlements given to 'levels' of mastery, if you will, that does include chocolatier. The name escapes me, and I've not run across it for a few years, but he could be referring to that. It's more marketing than anything, and for the reason most companies don't go through the hassle of obtaining what's often viewed as a straw document.

March 19, 2005
4:18 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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Well said. His claims are very vague. I don't think Marcolini leans one way or the other, but rather the implications that the statements convey certainly might lead one to think this. Just consider him the "Bill Clinton" of the chocolate world [;)]

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