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Working out cocoa butter %
August 8, 2008
10:14 am
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Forum Posts: 199
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October 20, 2005
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As a general rule, I understand that cocoa mass is approximately 50% cocoa solids and 50% cocoa butter (roughly). So, a 70% bar would be 35% cocoa butter, 35% cocoa solids and 30% sugar (roughly [:)])

As we all know, the cocoa butter % often gets altered by the mfter. My question is, can you use the Fat % on the nutritional information panel of the chocolate bar to estimate the cocoa butter % of the product?

Eg., if I have a 70% chocolate bar with a 40% fat content, is it possible to say that the bar has 40% cocoa butter and, therefore, 30% cocoa solids? Or is this over-simplifying the matter?

Thanks

August 9, 2008
11:17 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
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October 13, 2009
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quote:


Originally posted by gap


As we all know, the cocoa butter % often gets altered by the mfter. My question is, can you use the Fat % on the nutritional information panel of the chocolate bar to estimate the cocoa butter % of the product?

Eg., if I have a 70% chocolate bar with a 40% fat content, is it possible to say that the bar has 40% cocoa butter and, therefore, 30% cocoa solids? …


Yes. The only exceptions would be milk chocolate, which contains some milkfat (dry powdered milk is around 25% milkfat) and vegelate or other “doctored” chocolates. Some manufacturers add milkfat to “dark” chocolate – a strange grey area since by the fact that milk chocolate contains it as well, an argument could be made that this was simply a very dark milk chocolate, and therefore possibly a “fine” chocolate. IMHO the addition of milk fat is one of the more acceptable additives, marginally similar to soya lecithin although much more in a grey area, but nonetheless, the use of an additive like this makes me question the manufacturer’s commitment to quality.

All of these cases are, however, obvious on the label so you know when there’s no guesswork involved.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
August 10, 2008
11:04 am
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Forum Posts: 199
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October 20, 2005
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Thanks for the response Alex

September 3, 2008
4:44 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
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July 5, 2006
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Great explination Alex…Just to clarify…There can be reasons to add milkfat to chocolate. The reason being in the tempering process. A small percentage of milkfat added to a dark chocolate will help to keep a tempered chocolate from blooming for a longer amount of time. This is why milkfat is used here and there. Milk can also be used to add flavor those as well to cover up or change the flavor to the desired flavor that the company is shooting for. For me personally I will not bicker about a small percentage of milkfat being in chocolate used for confectionery applications but I will bicker if I find milkfat in an eating chocolate bar where it does not need to be.

Have a great day,

Some Chocolate Guy
http://www.chocolatiernoel.com
http://www.chocolateguild.com

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com