Please consider registering
guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —

  

— Match —

   

— Forum Options —

   

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Topic RSS
Callebaut 6040
August 22, 2007
1:52 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline

I like Callebaut 6040 a lot; I think it's one of their better chocolates and one of the best deals on the market, but I am unsure about its performance in ganache, shell molding, and enrobing. I read that the 71% is a better candidate for those purposes, but for the people I am considering, 71% might be too much, and the 60% is actually plenty strong, more so than you would expect for its range. Does anyone have any opinions, suggestions, etc.?

August 22, 2007
6:13 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline

quote:


Originally posted by Montegrano

I like Callebaut 6040 a lot; I think it's one of their better chocolates and one of the best deals on the market, but I am unsure about its performance in ganache,


Very good. You should have no problems. Many confectioners, in fact, use it for this purpose. It'll be on the sweeter side, but you'd expect that. 6040 is usually somewhat better in flavoured ganaches because it gets out of the way of the other flavours and doesn't compete too aggressively. On its own, it may seem a little plain and ordinary, but that is as much a simple result of our taste buds being attuned to the flavour of 6040 as "typical" and "ordinary" because it's so ubiquitous as it is to its own flavour balance.

shell molding, and enrobing.

A bit thick, but fairly usable. This would really only come into play if you were moulding very complex shapes which require the very highest fluidity. Probably the best cheap, basic chocolate for that is Guittard's Coucher du Soleil 72%. But except for this specialised application you should be fine.

quote:


I read that the 71% is a better candidate for those purposes, but for the people I am considering, 71% might be too much, and the 60% is actually plenty strong, more so than you would expect for its range. Does anyone have any opinions, suggestions, etc.?


Do you mean 7030? That's Callebaut's basic 70%-range chocolate. 7030 is pretty classic for ganache, and it is better, less plain-Jane, than 6040 for an unflavoured ganache. For moulding, however, it's got about the same viscosity as 6040, perhaps slightly less.

Guittard is the other good, basic chocolate overall. You could use either the 61% or the 72% depending on what you think your audience would appreciate. Chucuri is also very approachable at a mid-percentage - surely the best value in an origin chocolate for an audience intimidated by high percentages.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
August 22, 2007
7:22 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 1462
Member Since:
August 1, 2006
Offline

Thanks for the help, Alex.

Actually, I'll probably go with Guittard's Coucher du Soleil 72% because as you imply, it has more versatility and it's almost the same price as the Callebaut. I tried it once, however, and wasn't particularly impressed with it (lack of flavor), but since I intend to add flavorings to the ganache this chocolate will suffice. But I was told that this chocolate is actually 60%, with an additional 12% of cocoa butter.

I'm not necessarily looking for single origin either, especially the Guittard varietals because I find them too soft and not as strong as I would like. Chucuri for sure will lose its unique properties--I'm afraid the cream and other flavorings will dilute its delicate flavor. Recchiuti uses Guittard in the ganaches, and although I'm not sure which chocolate it is, the overall strength of the pieces was very subtle. If he uses the 72%, then I'll have to reconsider.

August 29, 2007
4:18 pm
erikos
New York, USA
Member
Forum Posts: 17
Member Since:
July 13, 2006
Offline

Personally I find 6040 too think to enrobe or make shells with, I like relatively thin shells. The first time I used it I thought something was wrong because it was so viscous and my shells came out twice as thick as I was use to. Not too important if you're making chocolate pretzels but it doesn't work if you're trying to make delicate looking pralines. For ganache I think it's great, and think it goes well with various fruits and berries.

Callebaut 6040 | Ingredients | Forum