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Chocolate & Ice cream
January 18, 2006
12:36 pm
Marcellus
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Forum Posts: 70
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January 16, 2006
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I made some dessert cups recently from Callebaut plain chocolate 53.5%
and filled them with ice cream. I noticed when eating that the chocolate became brittle and lost flavour. Is there anything I can add to the chocolate to avoid this and still retain the finish of the tempered chocolate? Someone told me that adding ghee might help but if so how much?
Would appreciate any advice.

Thanks

January 18, 2006
2:55 pm
Sebastian
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Forum Posts: 430
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September 30, 2004
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That’s gonna be a tough one. As you’ve noticed, chocolate becomes very hard when cold, and flavor release is inhibited (flavor is a function of volatiles, and things aren’t so volatile at -20…). Most ice cream products are made with high %’s of very soft oils – butter (ghee), soybean, coconut, peanut – to soften them. However, an issue i forsee with what you’re doing is that you will certainly be able to make the cups softer so that it’s texturally nicer and has better flavor release, but the moment someone picks them up, they’ll melt all over their fingers. Of course, the moment you add significant levels of other oils, you’re also going to loose the ability to temper it and get a nice shine. Perhaps an edible spray lacquer could address the presentation. Temper’s gonna be a harder one to address.

January 19, 2006
2:43 pm
Marcellus
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January 16, 2006
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Thanks Sebastian. I think I’ll leave things be. I confess, before I put the question, I did try tempering the chocolate with a small amount of ghee added but the result was a disaster. I thought that I was maybe using too much but from what you say I think the whole idea is probably a non-starter. Perhaps milk chocolate would retain its flavour better at low temperature so I’ll maybe use it next time.

January 19, 2006
2:48 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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August 1, 2006
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You want to use an intense and strong chocolate, such as Gran Saman, since as Sebastian pointed out, the cold dulls the flavor. A milk chocolate imo is too mild to begin with (low cocoa solids). But if you want to use milk, try using one with a highly characterized and intense flavor.

January 19, 2006
3:22 pm
asmokemezzo
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Forum Posts: 32
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November 19, 2004
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This may sound like heresy, but adding a little paraffin wax can help – you won’t need to temper the chocolate, even, just melt the chocolate and wax together and pour into your molds. It changes the flavor somewhat, but it should help it stay a little softer when frozen, and it will still have the sheen of tempered chocolate.