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chocolate for ganache
June 25, 2008
10:05 pm
cocoa-girls
United Kingdom
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June 25, 2008
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Hi there

I have recently started making my own dipped truffles and moulded chocolates. I am interested in what brands of chocolate other chocolate makers use for their centres, fillings and ganaches. I am hoping to use good quality couverture for dipping and moulding (Valrhona, Callebaut) but I wondered should I use the same quality of chocolate for my fillings, particularly since I will be flavouring many of the centres

any advice or info would be appreciated

cocoa-girl

June 25, 2008
11:35 pm
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Hi cocoa-girls,

I would recommend using good quality chocolate in your centres as well. Even though you’re flavouring the centres, the chocolate will still feature in the taste/mouthfeel and good quality ingredients are always the first step to a good quality product.

June 26, 2008
5:13 pm
Foodpump
Vancouver, Canada
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March 4, 2008
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While the flavouring you add to your ganache will change the couveture’s taste, it is important that you use a decent quality couveture for this purpose. I usually use the more expensive couverture for enrobing ( I use Lindt 70% for this)and a good, but better priced couverture for the ganaches. There are many varieties of Callebaut, some very good, and some more, uh, “economical”.

Among other things to consider in the price of couverture is usually the lower the price=the lower amount of cocoa butter.

For other brands suitable for ganaches you can research: Chocoa, Belcoa

June 27, 2008
6:59 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
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October 13, 2009
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quote:


Originally posted by Foodpump

While the flavouring you add to your ganache will change the couveture’s taste, it is important that you use a decent quality couveture for this purpose. I usually use the more expensive couverture for enrobing ( I use Lindt 70% for this)and a good, but better priced couverture for the ganaches. There are many varieties of Callebaut, some very good, and some more, uh, “economical”.


Interesting that the opinion seems to favour better chocolate for the shells. I, if anything, am of the *reverse* persuasion – that if anything it’s the shell where you can use the slightly cheaper chocolate, because at least IME the flavour of the shell never stands out as much as the centre. Given that a flavoured ganache centre should, in any case, taste of a blend of the chocolate and the flavouring, you need a good chocolate so that its flavour will stand with the flavouring used. IME the very best way is to match the type of flavouring with the flavour profile of the chocolate used – but this does lead to using a large number of different chocolates for different centres, implying more complex inventory management and making it impossible to use a “standard” ganache for all your centres. So that may be further than you want to go.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
June 28, 2008
6:45 am
Foodpump
Vancouver, Canada
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Different thoughts, different styles. I tend to use a fairly high proportion of liquids (almost 1:1) which includes fresh cream, booze/eau de vie, fruit purees, plus butter. For me it seems a shame to use “the good stuff” to mix with.

June 28, 2008
8:03 am
Ilana
Israel
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Alex, I am trying to figure this out. I also think it is important to have a very good chocolate in the ganache, but also the shell. I thought to decide on 2 couvertures to use for shells for dark-due to management reasons of my tools and time- I am small! I have had problems with the shell overpowering the filling. This is because I love 70& Guanaja!! So I am now experimenting with 64% Manjari, which I also adore. Here I can only get some of the Callebaut line and most of the Valrhona. I use Valrhona. Any suggestions by which I can decide what to use?

Ilana Bar-Hai www.ganache.co.il
June 28, 2008
10:47 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
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quote:


Originally posted by Ilana

Alex, I am trying to figure this out. I also think it is important to have a very good chocolate in the ganache, but also the shell. I thought to decide on 2 couvertures to use for shells for dark-due to management reasons of my tools and time- I am small! I have had problems with the shell overpowering the filling. This is because I love 70& Guanaja!! So I am now experimenting with 64% Manjari, which I also adore. Here I can only get some of the Callebaut line and most of the Valrhona. I use Valrhona. Any suggestions by which I can decide what to use?


In an earlier post, I mention, that, at least in terms of customer preference, the ideal combination is a high-strength, low-cocoa-butter centre chocolate with a high-percentage, extreme-cocoa-butter shell chocolate. At high percentage but extreme cocoa butter, the flavour remains mild.

Valrhona is usually good but not extreme in cocoa butter. To my recollection Araguani is high cocoa butter, however. Their 85% Abinao has more, but it’s too strong and in any case poor – I can’t recommend it. Use Guanaja for the centres which has a fine bold flavour. Be aware, however, that Guanaja is a poor match for dark, earthy flavours such as coffee or liquorice. If your choices are limited you may want to consider tuning the filling flavourings to match what is available.

It’s worth noting that the Callebaut organic 70% is very high cocoa butter and not that terribly bad, so if you are prepared to consider a different supplier you might think about it for the shells. Valrhona is however, on the whole a higher quality manufacturer.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
June 29, 2008
8:18 am
Ilana
Israel
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September 1, 2006
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Thanks. I don’t know how I missed this earlier- sorry you had to repeat. Great advice. Now would it be reasonable to add some cocoa butter for the shells? They are quite fluid (low viscosity) but I could work at a lower temp and then it would work. This is an area I really need more knowledge on. It is problematic because of my personal preferences. So thanks!

Ilana Bar-Hai www.ganache.co.il
July 5, 2008
1:41 am
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
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October 13, 2009
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quote:


Originally posted by Ilana

Thanks. I don’t know how I missed this earlier- sorry you had to repeat. Great advice. Now would it be reasonable to add some cocoa butter for the shells? They are quite fluid (low viscosity) but I could work at a lower temp and then it would work. This is an area I really need more knowledge on. It is problematic because of my personal preferences. So thanks!


I don’t see why not, although I’ve never added cocoa butter specifically for the purpose of creating shells. Obviously this is going to change your temper profile (= much experimentation initially) but I’m sure you know that. IIRC Guanaja is more fluid that Manjari, although in terms purely of shell formation either works fine on its own. But of course if you want the shell to be muted in flavour adding more cocoa butter is an easy solution. By using the Araguani (milder in flavour than the bold Guanaja) in combination with more cocoa butter you might get the centres to stand out more from the shell.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
July 5, 2008
10:52 am
Ilana
Israel
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September 1, 2006
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10

Well thank you! I will try the Araguani with a bit of cocoa butter. Thanks for the advice.

Ilana Bar-Hai www.ganache.co.il