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Glucose syrup
January 18, 2007
1:25 am
sam
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hello.
Could someone please tell me why glucose syrop is used in ganache making? Is that the best one to use? What other sugar types can be used for ganache fillings?
Thanks.

January 18, 2007
10:57 am
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Hi Sam,

I’ve made ganache with glucose/corn syrup, caster sugar (melted to a caramel and combined with the other liquids/chocolates) and invert sugar. Honey as well – does that count as a sugar? I think I am right in saying that glucose is used for mouthfeel/taste and extension of shelf-life.

January 18, 2007
11:47 am
Sebastian
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You’re bang on gap – it lowers the Aw (water activity), meaning your truffles (can) last longer.

January 18, 2007
2:33 pm
TC
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Hi
Can anyone out there tell me what the shelf life is for fresh cream truffles when using Glucose syrup?

January 18, 2007
3:43 pm
Sebastian
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Nope – there are too many other variables involved to give a hard and fast rule on that…types of other ingredients, amounts, how it’s mixed together, storage conditions, Aw, etc etc etc all need to be factored in…

January 19, 2007
1:46 am
sam
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thanks for the replies.
I have never used invert(ed??) sugar. For which application would you use it? (for ganache making aswell?) Which is better, glucose syrup or invert sugar? (Or are they the same thing?)
From what I understand, the reason why we use syrups rather than castor sugar (unless to make caramel) is because you’d not want your ganache to become hard, right?

From a confused Sam.

January 19, 2007
2:53 am
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Hi Sam,

I’ll have a go here and can be corrected by others if need be. Glucose is different to invert sugar. They are both sugars, but glucose has about 70% the sweetness of regular sugar (the type you buy in the supermarket) whereas invert sugar has about 130% the sweetness of regular sugar.

Once again though, invert sugar is used to extend shelf life and can be used in a ganache. I don’t think you could say either glucose or invert sugar is better, they are just ingredients that can be used to give a desired result. Glucose tends to be easier to get hold of (you can typically buy it in a supermarket here in Australia).

January 19, 2007
3:50 pm
sam
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thank you for the answer! Thats good to know that it doesn’t matter either way, because i can only get hold of glucose syrup. I take it that the shelf life is prolonged by the use of glucose syrup too?
- If the invert sugar has more sweetness, then it has more shelf life than glucose syrup I guess, just like how more sugar in jam making acts as a preservative…?
- Also, if a recipe calls for invert sugar, but you’ll be using glucose syrup as a substitute, you’d want to use more to match the sweetness…?
- Am sorry for throwing so many questions..
Sam

January 21, 2007
4:17 am
HawaiiChocolate
Hawaii National Park, USA
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I bought bakers glucose syrup from France from my local distributor. It says it is made from wheat, so needs an allergen statement.

January 21, 2007
11:43 pm
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Sam,

yes, glucose can extend shelf life. But as Sebastian mentioned above, there are a lot of other variables which can alter shelf life as well.

I’m not sure about your second comment. Happy to be corrected by the more scientific minded amongst us, but I don’t think the level of sweetness necessarily corresponds to the increase in shelf life. I think its just a sweeter sugar. Like I said though, I’m not entirely sure on this and am happy to be corrected.

On your last question, I’m not sure about substituting glucose for invert sugar in recipes. You are right that more glucose would be needed to match the sweetness provided by invert sugar, but too much glucose in a recipe may also affect the final product. Maybe others have more experience substituting these ingredients? Otherwise a bit of experimentation may be called for. :-)

January 22, 2007
9:56 am
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Actually, the question of substituting glucose for invert sugar has just become of interest for me as well. I have a recipe that calls for both glucose and invert sugar in equal parts. Other than producing a sweeter taste, is there any reason why you would want to use both glucose and invert sugar in a ganache?

January 22, 2007
12:01 pm
Sebastian
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Invert sugar will contain 1/2 fructose, which is sweeter than sucrose or glucose, so using only glucose syrup will result in a less sweet product than if you used a similar amount of glucose syrup. Additionally, ‘glucose syrup’ is extremely broad – there are all kinds of different types of glucose syrups – i’m guessing what is meant by most of them is light corn syrup found on the store shelves. If you’ve a recipe that calls for both, it’s likely a sweetening balance thing, where the person who wrote the recipe liked the sweetness profile he/she got when using both of them.

January 22, 2007
4:17 pm
sam
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Another ingredient I have trouble understanding is ‘Trimoline’. I have recipe books stating those to be used…
Sam

January 22, 2007
8:36 pm
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Sebastian – thanks for the response. My guess was the recipe was after a sweeter taste given the type of chocolate it was being combined with.

Sam – Trimoline is invert sugar

January 25, 2007
5:18 am
erikos
New York, USA
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July 13, 2006
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Here is an explanation of inverted sugar http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I…..ugar_syrup. From what I understand, honey is a ‘natural’ inverted sugar.
For a ganache, it will also affect stability, besides the ‘mouthfeel’ and sweetness. Some ganaches (as well as brands of chocolate) can be difficult to make without using trimoline.
As with any other ingredient, you can’t use too much it. The Wybaugh book talks about water activity as well as the different sugars that you can use and to some extent why. I believe a lot of books don’t recommend going beyond 5% glucose, before it affects your product in negative way (taste). Too much trimoline will affect texture and it is not an inexpensive product.
You can go pretty far without using these ‘fancy’ sugars, it all depends on how you (and ultimately your customer) like your product.

August 14, 2007
9:41 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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I recently bought Peter Greweling’s book Chocolate and Confections and have found it to be very helpful and informative. However, in almost all the recipes (ganache for sure, but the others I forgot) he uses glucose syrup (i.e. corn syrup) in the centers. So I was wondering if I could forgo the syrup and follow the recipe exactly, or if I had to make any changes. I have a feeling changes will need to be made (water content alterations), but is there a sort of guideline to follow and apply to each recipe rather than provide specific examples? The recipes look safe, but I’m not a big fan of using syrup.

August 18, 2007
1:50 pm
tammylc
Ann Arbor, USA
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Montegrano – you should be able to just leave out the glucose in the recipes in the Grewling book. He formulates his recipes on a basis of 2 parts chocolate to 1 part liquid, but specifically mentions that glucose is not considered a liquifier because of the way it binds water. I think the recipes will work fine without it, particularly if you are not concerned about getting a long shelf life.

That said, however, I have been quite happy with my basic ganache texture since i started using glucose in my formulations.

http://www.tammystastings.com

www.tammystastings.com
August 22, 2007
1:48 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Thanks. I’ll give it a shot to see how it turns out, but I get the impression you have not tried it this way, correct?

I want to make two batches: one that contains the syrup and one that doesn’t, so I can compare the two and see which one I like the best. Also, volume I suspect will determine whether it gets used or not.

August 23, 2007
2:26 am
tammylc
Ann Arbor, USA
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You’re right, I have not tried any of his recipes without the glucose. But I have other recipes that I make that don’t include it.

I’d be very interested in hearing the results of your side by side comparisons!

http://www.tammystastings.com

www.tammystastings.com
March 5, 2008
3:15 pm
Foodpump
Vancouver, Canada
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I havae been using trimoline in my ganaches, soley for shelf like purposes. Are there any caveats when using the invert sugar? I read somewhere ( and now Ican’t remember where!) that if invert sugar was heated to above a certain point (60 or 70 C, can’t remember) it would render the water retaining proereties useless.

Anybody have any ideas?