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Honey / Corn Syrup
March 18, 2006
1:39 pm
debc
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February 18, 2006
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When making truffles, I always add honey to extend the shelf life of the truffles. However, I found that whenever I added the honey, the truffles taste a little bit too sweet. Can I use corn syrup instead in order to reduce the sweetness? Any effect on the shelf life if I do so?

Thanks advance for the advice!!!

March 18, 2006
1:55 pm
Sebastian
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Yes, corn s yrup will extend the shelf life. You can also add invert sugar or invertase.

March 18, 2006
4:29 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Just don’t use golden syrup. If you do, then prepare for a stronger sweetness.

March 19, 2006
1:21 pm
debc
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February 18, 2006
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Thank you for the advice from both of you.

I understand that corn syrup contains more liquid/water than honey. Do I have to reduce/increase the other ingredients in the recipe in order to maintain the same consistency?

Thanks again!

March 19, 2006
8:19 pm
Sebastian
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realistically you’ll only be adding a small amount of corn syrup, not enough to affect texture significantly. Perhaps you’ve got a more sensitive taster than i, so the proof will be in your first batch, but i’d not expect significant differences.

March 20, 2006
3:12 am
debc
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You are right. Thank you for your advice again.

March 20, 2006
3:30 pm
patsikes
Tampa Bay Area, FL, USA
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I prefer the invertase route if you are just looking for a bit of a shelf life extension. It just converts the sugar that is already present in the genache rather that adding new sweetness.

Patrick Sikes
P.S. I Love You Fine Chocolates
http://www.psiloveyouchocolates.com

Patrick Sikes www.MyChocolateJournal.com
March 20, 2006
3:52 pm
debc
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February 18, 2006
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patsikes,

does invertase same as invert sugar?

debc

March 20, 2006
8:09 pm
patsikes
Tampa Bay Area, FL, USA
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It is an enzyme that actually causes the sugar that is in the ganache to invert.

Here is the definition from wikipidia.com:
Invertase (or officially beta-fructofuranosidase) is the enzyme used by bees to convert nectar into honey. In its industrial or confectionery form, it is derived from yeast. Confectioners, like bees, use it to split sucrose into fructose and glucose and also to improve the shelf life of their products (honey has been found unspoiled in the Egyptian Pyramids).

Not very techy about food science, just from what I have read in the past.

I use about 1/4 t for a ganache made with 1lb of chocolate.

Patrick Sikes
P.S. I Love You Fine Chocolates
http://www.psiloveyouchocolates.com

Patrick Sikes www.MyChocolateJournal.com
March 21, 2006
1:05 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Go here:

http://www.seventypercent.com/…..vert,sugar

Most inquiries of invert sugar should be covered there.

March 23, 2006
4:00 pm
debc
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February 18, 2006
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Thanks for all advice!!!