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inverted sugar help !!!
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guernsey ben
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May 20, 2005 - 8:34 pm
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i live on a small island i want try some new recipes but they have inverted sugar in them could i use something like golden syrup?

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Hans-Peter Rot
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May 20, 2005 - 10:23 pm
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Is it artificial or natural invert sugar? Some recipes call for natural invert sugar (e.g. honey) because it doesn't crystallize (the structural components won't allow it), and it allows for easy caramelization. Artificial invert sugar (treated with an acid such as cream of tartar) browns less because the acidity slows down caramelizaton. Golden syrup actually is a combination of invert sugar (approximately 50%) and sucrose and has a much milder flavor. Invert sugar also has a more intense sweetness than golden syrup. If you're interested in the actual properties and components of these I can explain, but I won't go into it if you don't want me to.

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guernsey ben
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May 21, 2005 - 5:30 pm
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quote:


Originally posted by Montegrano

Is it artificial or natural invert sugar? Some recipes call for natural invert sugar (e.g. honey) because it doesn't crystallize (the structural components won't allow it), and it allows for easy caramelization. Artificial invert sugar (treated with an acid such as cream of tartar) browns less because the acidity slows down caramelizaton. Golden syrup actually is a combination of invert sugar (approximately 50%) and sucrose and has a much milder flavor. Invert sugar also has a more intense sweetness than golden syrup. If you're interested in the actual properties and components of these I can explain, but I won't go into it if you don't want me to.


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guernsey ben
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May 21, 2005 - 5:34 pm
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thank for that if you could go in to it more that would be great i always think that the more you no about something the better it is

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Hans-Peter Rot
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May 22, 2005 - 8:46 pm
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When a solution of sucrose (table sugar) is heated in the presence of an acid, it breaks apart into two subsugars called glucose and fructose. This process is called inversion, and the resulting mixture is called invert sugar or invert syrup (invert sugar always exists as a syrup because of the inability of the fructose to crystallize in the presence of glucose and sucrose). Invert sugar is 75% glucose and fructose and 25% sucrose. It's used in candy making because they limit the extent of sucrose crystallization.

Golden syrup is a cane syrup (as opposed to corn syrup) and being as such (derived from cane sugar), it has a more intense sweetness and richness. They generally have a combination of sucrose (25-30%) and invert sugars (50%) and also have a milder and more caramel-like flavor.

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gap
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January 19, 2006 - 5:45 am
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To pick-up on this thread . . .

Do the above posts mean that honey can be used as a substitute for invert sugar (leaving the issue of taste aside)?

The only source I can find for commercial invert sugar stocks it in 14kg lots which is a bit beyond my needs.

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Hans-Peter Rot
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January 19, 2006 - 6:18 am
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Basically, yes, because honey is a natural invert sugar that has not been further elaborated on by man. In fact, invert sugar is sometimes referred to as artifical honey because its composition and properties are the same.

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gap
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January 19, 2006 - 12:04 pm
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Thanks Montegrano - that's good news for my selection of recipes and my budget!

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Hans-Peter Rot
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January 19, 2006 - 2:09 pm
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No problem, but just to be safe, I would run a test batch to see how the honey reacts. Better to find a flaw in a small test run than in a full scale batch that could cost you more than you can allow. Also, I want to point out that a lot of people will add baking soda to a recipe in which they use honey as a substitute because this often counters the acidity of honey and adds another degree of softness and leavening to the final product. Depending on what you're making, though, this may not be required.

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inverted sugar help !!! | Ingredients | Forum