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Natural Colourings & How to Use Novelty Moulds
June 18, 2008
2:55 pm
stow10
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April 20, 2008
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Hi there, does anyone know of a supplier for natural colourings? I recently bought some white chocolate which had some natural strawberry colouring to make it pink.

Also, I have great difficulty piping detail into the clear plastic novelty moulds. I can’t see what Im doing as they are clear. Any suggestions would be gratefully received. Ive tried different coloured backgrounds but that doesn’t really help.

June 18, 2008
5:53 pm
Ilana
Israel
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September 1, 2006
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I use natural cocoa color from chef rubber in vegas.

Ilana Bar-Hai www.ganache.co.il
June 19, 2008
11:22 am
stow10
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quote:


Originally posted by Ilana

I use natural cocoa color from chef rubber in vegas.


Is this is in powder or paste form? Who is chef rubber? what colours can you obtain? Are they expensive?

June 26, 2008
5:21 pm
Foodpump
Vancouver, Canada
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March 4, 2008
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Don’t know if the stuff from Chef Rubber is a natural colouring or not, however it is pre-mixed and comes in plastic bottles.

The best colours to use for chocolate work are the fat soluable powders. I have only the 3 primary colour powders and mix my own colours from there on.
Making your own colours from the powder and cocoa butter is far more economical than buying the pre made stuff, (if you ever work for an employer who insist he won’t buy you any “luxuries”…) but there is a bit more work involved:

Melt some cocoa butter, add in the colouring power and stir well, Allow to solidify, then melt again and stir well again. It’s ready. With this you can tint your own white chocolate, or use it straight with paint brushes to paint or accent what ever you desire.

June 27, 2008
12:19 am
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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October 20, 2005
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I also mix my own colours. As Foodpump says, you must use fat soluble colours. I use a hand mixer to mix the colours and strain before using (new/clean stockings are good for this).

June 27, 2008
11:47 am
stow10
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Thanks for the replies. Ive been told though that cocoa butter still needs to be tempered, after having the colour mixed in otherwise you will lose the “snap” in the chocolate. I have tried your suggested method but find it a lot of faff with tempering and paint brushes seazing up with cocoa butter. Also, I find the cooco butter unmanageable whilst its still warm. Please tell me where I’m going wrong

June 27, 2008
3:51 pm
Gracie
Chippenham, United Kingdom
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June 23, 2007
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Generally you won’t be adding enough coloured cocoa butter (hopefully!) to affect the temper of your chocolate and if you’re applying it either before or after the main body of chocolate, it won’t affect the snap anyway, but could cause you problems with unmoulding.

I temper my coloured cocoa butter in one batch (on marble) and then shave it to use little bits at a time.It is very fluid when warm so you need a decent amount of surface to work it.
If you use the pre-made colours, pop them in the microwave /bain marie for a while to melt PART of the mass, then shake vigorously. The unmelted portion together with the shaking will temper the rest, then you can squeeze out a tiny bit at a time to use. If your brushes cool, use a hair drier to warm them up again.

If you use an airbrush you don’t need to temper the cocoa butter as the agitation from the process cools and tempers it on the way out of the brush. It’s maybe not worth the hassle of cleaning for small quantities though, so I’d stick with a brush if that’s the case.

June 27, 2008
7:24 pm
stow10
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Thanks for that reply. That was really helpful.

June 28, 2008
7:56 am
Ilana
Israel
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September 1, 2006
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Chefrubber carries natural and not natural. However their natural line does come pre mixed in plastic bottles and they are certainly natural. I never use artificial ingredients in anything in any of my food or chocolates so I have checked this out well.

Ilana Bar-Hai www.ganache.co.il