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What chocolate do you use?
April 17, 2006
11:58 pm
dvdman
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Forum Posts: 27
Member Since:
July 7, 2005
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I’m trying to find out what chocolates are being used and the results that are coming from them. The reason why I’m asking is because it would be very costly to try all the different chocolates from all the different companies. I tried to get samples from different distributors, but they don’t seem to care about the little guy. Anyway, if you can tell me what chocolate maker, type of chocolate, maybe the item number, what you’re using it for (enrobe, dip, center, etc..) and your results with the particular chocolate. Once I get an idea of peoples results then I think that will help me figure out the ones that I will buy to compare for myself. Thanks in advance for your help and time.

April 18, 2006
4:34 am
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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October 20, 2005
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I use Callebaut milk couverture (I think the item code is Select 823). I find this good if I want to make thick moulded pralines or truffles with a thick coating. I also use Lindt couverture (milk, dark and white) which is good if I want a thinner layer. The two brands also have a very different taste from one another, which friends can pick (the majority prefer the Lindt milk over the Callebaut when it is just eaten plain).

April 20, 2006
1:48 pm
wrks4choc
Hopewell Junction, USA
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February 23, 2006
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dvdman;
Here’s some suggestions, first all when calling a company for samples, don’t necessarily be upfront with exactly how much production you intend on, allow them to think you are considering ordering palets of chocolate, you never know when you may need that much in the future, they will be glad to send you samples which by the way costs them nothing. Also, if you attend any foodshows, when their are choc. co. reps there they are always happy to talk to you and send samples even if you are the little guy, because they never know when that little guy will turn into the big guy. Last, depending on what you are looking for will coerce your chocolate decision, if you want to say you use ‘only the finest european chocolate’ well then you need to explore the likes of Callebaut, Belcolade, Valrhona, etc., but if you are in the states and merely want a good choco. that is reasonable, then my suggestion is E Guittard, it is very comparable to Callebaut and is easier to obtain, and it costs about the same. There are many wonderful chocolates out there, if I could spare no expense I would probably go with Valrhona or M.Cluzel chocolate, but I’m happy with the Callebaut for now. Hope that helps.

Keep it Sweet!

Keep it Sweet!
April 20, 2006
4:43 pm
Sebastian
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Forum Posts: 430
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September 30, 2004
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Actually, i would disagree with just about everything you suggest 8-)

Most chocolate companies *want* to serve the little guy. Consciously lying to your supplier is a good way to get a big fat nada – most of us know exactly who’s out there and what your volumes are, and if all of a sudden someone who’s never been heard of before shows up with huge volumes – well, we know better than that, and if you’re starting the relationship off like that, it’s a good indicator that you’ll be problematic in the future, and we just don’t need that. Go directly to the mfr, be up front with them and let them know you’re looking for samples (samples are a huge cost, by the way – most chocolate companies sample costs are higher than their average customers annual revenue!). You’re not going to get cases of dozens of types of chocolate for free, but the technical staff or the sales staff can help you narrow down what’s appropriate for you, and go from there. If you’re a consumer looking for free chocolate, we’re pretty attuned to that as well.

Best advice is to be honest and up front. If you’re very small the manufacturer’s aren’t likely to sell directly to you in the end, but through a distributor – that doesn’t mean the mfr’s aren’t willing to help you make your decisions and get you on your way however.

April 20, 2006
9:57 pm
dvdman
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July 7, 2005
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Sebastian, do you work for a chocolate manufacturer?

April 21, 2006
12:46 am
Sebastian
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Forum Posts: 430
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September 30, 2004
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Yes.

April 21, 2006
1:13 am
dvdman
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July 7, 2005
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Sebastian- May I ask which one? Would it be possible to get some samples? I have already talked to El Rey and Belcolade, both of which said they’re sending me some samples. I was up front with both of them in terms of my plan and goals. They were very helpful, which surprised me, because I have tried to ask distributors for samples, with no response. You can email me directly if you like. Thanks!

April 24, 2006
1:43 pm
wrks4choc
Hopewell Junction, USA
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Forum Posts: 82
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February 23, 2006
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Sebastian, no offense but I was not suggesting dvdman lie to the manufacturers, I was merely stating that if he wants samples from these companies it’s not a good idea to say ‘hey I only use 10lbs a week’, I was just saying that if he wants a couple of pounds in samples sent to be able to make an educated determination, yes, allow the company know that your are a chocolate maker, but if you want quick, service by way of samples, you’ll do better by letting them know that your volume may increase over time. Trust me on this one, I’ve been down this road many times, I do know what I’m talking about. Yes, there are some great companies out there that don’t care if you only want a small amt. weekly, but the big co. don’t like to waste a lot of time on the little guy. I would never insinuate to be dishonest, just work the conversation in such a way that you intend on increasing volume. Sometimes you have to play their games.

Keep it Sweet!

Keep it Sweet!
May 25, 2006
6:55 am
chenddyna
Bangalore, India
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Forum Posts: 25
Member Since:
April 16, 2005
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hi, what is the distributor price you are getting for callebaut 811 and 823. we buy it for Euro 11 per kg. and the 70-30 is euro 18 per kg. just curious to know if we r paying a lot more in India because of import duties.Chenddyna