3 Jan 2014: The Forum is currently in read-only made while we update to a new version of the Seventy% website and forum.

The forum will be back with a faster, simplified and up to date website in the next two months.

Please consider registering
guest

Log In

Lost password?
Advanced Search:

— Forum Scope —



— Match —



— Forum Options —




Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

The forums are currently locked and only available for read only access
Topic RSS
Lindt/Amadei Chuao/Domori Arriba&SDL
May 22, 2007
4:27 pm
karashi
Member
Forum Posts: 21
Member Since:
May 22, 2007
Offline

This is my first post… After browsing the forums (and the recent Noka debacle) I recently found a very well stocked chocolate specialty store within walking distance and blew $30 on chocolate (the owner also gave me bits and pieces to try. (The Lindt came from the local Zellers, though!)

I’m new to the whole chocolate thing, so I’m only putting in brief descriptions. Also, if people have suggestions, I’d be glad to hear them.

Lindt 70%: Very dry melt in the mouth, strong acidic twang that I disliked at first and then got used to. Liked it, mildly

Lindt Cuba 55%: I know this is not high enough for this site, but I really enjoyed it as a dessert chocolate. Sweet and vanilla, nice melty texture, no acid. And since it’s cheap, it may be my go-to for eating chocolate.

Lindt Madagascar/Ecuador: didn’t really leave much of an impression.

All the Lindts were very very smooth. Much smoother than any other chocolates I tried. Their sheens were much more perfect than the others too. I must say that I like the thin wafer form of this bar, rather than the thickness of the artisan bars. It’s easier to eat and get a melt going.

Amadei Chuao: Loved it. Had such a fruity flavor with a hint of acidity that complemented with the chocolatey flavor and a luscious smooth melt. I’ll be buying this again, though due to the cost, it’ll be a special occasion chocolate to keep onhand!

Domori Arriba: Enjoyed it. The dark fruit flavor kind of came and went and then came back, alternating with a slight bitterness. Melt was nice but smoothness wasn’t what I expected. There were a few tiny ‘nibs’ that had a crunch in both Domori bars that I tried.

Domori Sur de Lago: The chocolate store owner suggested this one, but I didn’t like it at all. I found the predominant bitter coffee taste to be offputtingly flat and it also had some crunchy nibs. Some acid notes appeared midway but quickly faded.

I didn’t really like the crude slab format of the Domori bars – made it a bit difficult to eat. The sheen and appearance were nowhere near the Amadei or Lindt chocolates.

Anyway, it’s back to the shop for me.

May 25, 2007
7:18 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline

quote:


Originally posted by karashi

This is my first post……

All the Lindts were very very smooth. Much smoother than any other chocolates I tried.


Really? In comparison to Domori? IME Domori is much, much smoother than Lindt: their only real competition is Hachez and Cluizel. I’m surprised you thought the Lindts had that sort of texture. Perhaps the thicker melt of the Domori is what you’re thinking of – with less cocoa butter, they don’t have the very fluid melt of a Lindt.

quote:


Their sheens were much more perfect than the others too. I must say that I like the thin wafer form of this bar, rather than the thickness of the artisan bars. It’s easier to eat and get a melt going.


Another slight suprise because here I find Amedei to have a better finish, nearly always immaculate. Actually, though, it must be said that the very best finish is Valrhona’s: have you taken a look at a fresh Valrhona bar?

Interesting divergence on the thickness. I much prefer the thicker format because it gives stronger flavour delivery, especially in that all-important first taste. It’s also less unwieldy to get into the mouth: with the Lindt you have to angle it and bite a corner. Personal opinion here though. I’ll agree that the Domori lack of scoring makes for greater difficulties.

quote:


Domori Arriba: Enjoyed it. The dark fruit flavor kind of came and went and then came back, alternating with a slight bitterness. Melt was nice but smoothness wasn’t what I expected. There were a few tiny ‘nibs’ that had a crunch in both Domori bars that I tried.

Domori Sur de Lago: The chocolate store owner suggested this one, but I didn’t like it at all. I found the predominant bitter coffee taste to be offputtingly flat and it also had some crunchy nibs. Some acid notes appeared midway but quickly faded.


The way you describe this it sounds as though the Sur Del Lago was more bitter to you than the Arriba. Is that your impression? Again, my impression is definitely that Arriba is considerably more bitter whereas the SDL is quite relaxed overall.

I’m definitely with you on the strongly acid profile of the Lindt 70%. For me it’s just too much. Their 70% is good but not really superb, although it’s doesn’t lean towards the kind of bitter earthy/woody that a lot of volume-manufacturer bars tend.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
May 27, 2007
12:12 am
karashi
Member
Forum Posts: 21
Member Since:
May 22, 2007
Offline

quote:


Really? In comparison to Domori? IME Domori is much, much smoother than Lindt


Yeah, I read that in the reviews and was slightly puzzled. I’m not really referring to the thickness of the melt, here – it’s more whether I can detect any particles in the texture. With the Lindt, I got nothing. The Chuao had a very slight texture-y feel thoughout that didn’t detract.

But with the Domori, I actually got the odd tiny bit of -something- that I could actually crunch between my teeth. With both bars! The bits didn’t melt, either, so they weren’t sugar crystallization.

I really did find the Sur Del Lago more bitter (as opposed to acidic, which I don’t mind) than the Arriba. It was hint of a burnt-ashes kind of bitter. I dislike bitter in general, and there was enough of it in the SDL that it was the only one that I had any left of at the end of the day (which I gave to someone to try).

I suppose there’s the possibility that I got the bars confused once I had them outside of the boxes to do the side-by-side tasting. If I got them confused before I tasted them, they’d be consistently be put back in the wrong box, since they were very very distinct in flavor.

With regard to mold/form and finish – the two bars of Amadei that I got later were much more perfect. They were much glossier than the Lindt – though I could see more swirling in the Amadei. It was really the Domori bars that kind of looked a bit crude. Honestly, finish doesn’t really matter too much to me, but I’m curious and I’ll have to look through the Valrhona reviews and try one :)

I tend to put larger pieces (indeed up to a whole square) of thin bars in my mouth, so that I get the flavor over my whole tongue from start to finish. The Lindt squares are perfectly sized for this. I like the amount of chocolate in the Amadei mold, but I have to swirl it around in my mouth a bit to taste it with all parts of my tongue and it’s a bit tall. Nothing that bothers me greatly, though. Whereas the irregular shards of Domori that I break off irritate me slightly.

My last trip, I went looking for Domori Porcelena, but there was none to be found. Ended up getting the Amadei Chuao and 9.

Thanks for the feedback!

May 27, 2007
6:29 pm
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline

quote:


Originally posted by karashi

quote:


Really? In comparison to Domori? IME Domori is much, much smoother than Lindt



Yeah, I read that in the reviews and was slightly puzzled. I’m not really referring to the thickness of the melt, here – it’s more whether I can detect any particles in the texture. …

But with the Domori, I actually got the odd tiny bit of -something- that I could actually crunch between my teeth. With both bars! The bits didn’t melt, either, so they weren’t sugar crystallization.
{/quote]

Are you talking about isolated bits or a texture that pervaded the whole bar, so that it was quite literally bitty in texture? Generally speaking when I think of texture, an isolated stray nib or other small irregularity isn’t going to contribute to my assessment, other than, perhaps, to make a note. What I’m looking at is the bulk texture, i.e. what is the overall consistency of the chocolate. Usually Domori is at the very top of the range here and I can see how it’s possible a nib might find its way into a bar because they also make chocolate with nibs blended in. But that’s completely different. If what you were thinking of is the isolated bit in an otherwise hyper-smooth texture then that might be a more accurate way of conveying the situation.

{quote]
I suppose there’s the possibility that I got the bars confused once I had them outside of the boxes to do the side-by-side tasting.


How did you do this side-by-side tasting? For a truly thorough assessment, side-by-sides are risky, and involve a lot more set-up, because the flavour of one can linger in the mouth and affect your perception of the flavour of the other. Even if you take great pains to cleanse the palate (the most effective way is hot soupy polenta or hominy grits) your subjective impressions may be biassed by what you tasted in the first – it “set up your mind” to expect something specific. I tend to reserve side-by-sides for later assessments, as a comparison against something else where the objective isn’t to think of a bar’s merits standing on its own, but what it’s like compared to a different chocolate.

It’s also very risky indeed to take 2 chocolates out of the wrapper in a comparative testing if they come from the same manufacturer. The chances of accidentally confusing the 2 are just too great. Even the manufacturers themselves sometimes make this mistake (I have encountered at least 2 known situations where the manufacturer accidentally packed the wrong chocolate into the wrapper). Much more reliable is to open one bar, taste it, put it aside (and this will allow you a pause to cleanse your palate and do your best entirely to forget about what you’ve just tasted), then open the second. I generally write my tasting notes about the first before opening the second so that I can really have a fresh start and don’t have any thoughts swirling around that might get confused later. After the fact, of course, there’s no way to be certain whether you did in fact accidentally confuse the bars. Probably not, but then again you might recify the uncertainty by trying both bars again [:D]

quote:


I tend to put larger pieces (indeed up to a whole square) of thin bars in my mouth, so that I get the flavor over my whole tongue from start to finish.


Yeah, we have completely different definitions of “large”. [8D] To me large means probably at least 4 squares: so that for example with an Amedei bar I’ll take half of the entire bar as the first bite. My tasting philosophy differs from some – there’s been a discussion on this in the past.

The other thing is, the tongue isn’t really the primary sensory organ for chocolate: it’s the *nose* where you get most of the flavour or at least to be specific most of the flavour complexities, and what this means in this case is getting the chocolate over the entire mouth area so that maximum concentration of volatiles have a chance to make it up the nasal cavity. Oddly, if you concentrate on keeping on your tongue this has the effect of subduing flavour because the nasal cavity is at the back of the mouth, and keeping on the tongue moves it away from there.

What the tongue does is register the basic level of sweetness, bitterness, and sourness (also saltiness, although this has a very small part to play in chocolate). Thus your technique will certainly serve to stress any bitterness present, bring out any acidity (i.e. sourness) and determine how much sugar there is in the chocolate. Your tasting notes accurately reflect your tongue preference. It may be why SDL for you seemed aggressively bitter and didn’t have that same impact on others.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
May 28, 2007
4:30 pm
karashi
Member
Forum Posts: 21
Member Since:
May 22, 2007
Offline

Thanks again for the feedback!

Browsing around, I did happen across your ‘big bite’ tasting – but as a casual eater, I’ll probably just stick to savouring smaller (comparatively, anyway!) pieces!

I’ll keep in mind your notes on nasal vs tongue and side-by-side tastings. My notes were actually taken over several days where the chocolate was tasted individually, but I did taste them side-by-side first – so maybe I’ll resist the urge to do that until later. (Except for the Chauo, that was gone the first day. I was sad.)

My preference for coating the tongue includes the back of the tongue into the throat, so I think I did probably get some of the aroma. I do tend to describe tastes a bit less distinctly/descriptively than I’ve seen here, though, probably because of a personal reluctance to express myself subjectively and being new to fine chocolate in general.

May 28, 2007
5:18 pm
ChemicalMachine
USA
Member
Forum Posts: 110
Member Since:
June 5, 2005
Offline

quote:


Amadei Chuao: Loved it. Had such a fruity flavor with a hint of acidity that complemented with the chocolatey flavor and a luscious smooth melt. I’ll be buying this again, though due to the cost, it’ll be a special occasion chocolate to keep onhand!


The one kilogram blocks are much more affordable, and they disappear suprisingly fast for such a large mass of chocolate.

May 29, 2007
5:40 pm
karashi
Member
Forum Posts: 21
Member Since:
May 22, 2007
Offline

Oooh. Thanks for the tip ChemicalMachine. I’ll have to ask my local shop if he can source me some. So far, it’s by far my favorite (though I’m enjoying my latest bar, a Valrhona Guanaja, quite a bit.)

Also, today when I passed by, I begged another sample of Sur del Lago to see if I had switched the bars by accident. I hadn’t. The bitterness was slightly less than I remembered, but the dominant coffee-earthy note was still there. It tasted a bit sweeter than I remember too – but that might be because I crushed the sample with my teeth to facilitate the eating. (I’m a little self conscious standing there in front of the dude sampling the chocolate!)

November 6, 2008
12:46 am
karashi
Member
Forum Posts: 21
Member Since:
May 22, 2007
Offline

ChemicalMachine, it’s all your fault! I’m buying Amadei Chuao by the 1kg block now. Sigh.

The Chuao is DIVINE in truffles. I whipped up a batch of simple, unflavored Chuao ganache and handcoated them in more Chuao. It was surprisingly easy to temper as well. I’m not sure what the health ramifications might be of eating a kg of chocolate a month, though.

November 6, 2008
12:47 am
karashi
Member
Forum Posts: 21
Member Since:
May 22, 2007
Offline

ChemicalMachine, it’s all your fault! I’m buying Amadei Chuao by the 1kg block now. Sigh.

The Chuao is DIVINE in truffles. I whipped up a batch of simple, unflavored Chuao ganache and handcoated them in more Chuao. It was surprisingly easy to temper as well. I’m not sure what the health ramifications might be of eating a kg of chocolate a month, though.

November 7, 2008
2:08 am
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline
10

quote:


Originally posted by karashi

ChemicalMachine, it’s all your fault! I’m buying Amadei Chuao by the 1kg block now. Sigh.


The Chuao is DIVINE in truffles. I whipped up a batch of simple, unflavored Chuao ganache and handcoated them in more Chuao.

William Curley also does that – definitely a signature item. Yes, Chuao is almost the perfect truffle chocolate because of its strong flavour that doesn’t get smothered by cream, and the excellent melting properties that you allude to (it usually doesn’t “break” the ganache)

quote:


It was surprisingly easy to temper as well. I’m not sure what the health ramifications might be of eating a kg of chocolate a month, though.


Well, they can’t be that bad because I have considerably more than that per month and I’m still alive [;)]

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
November 7, 2008
2:08 am
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline
11

quote:


Originally posted by karashi

ChemicalMachine, it’s all your fault! I’m buying Amadei Chuao by the 1kg block now. Sigh.


The Chuao is DIVINE in truffles. I whipped up a batch of simple, unflavored Chuao ganache and handcoated them in more Chuao.

William Curley also does that – definitely a signature item. Yes, Chuao is almost the perfect truffle chocolate because of its strong flavour that doesn’t get smothered by cream, and the excellent melting properties that you allude to (it usually doesn’t “break” the ganache)

quote:


It was surprisingly easy to temper as well. I’m not sure what the health ramifications might be of eating a kg of chocolate a month, though.


Well, they can’t be that bad because I have considerably more than that per month and I’m still alive [;)]

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
November 7, 2008
2:09 am
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
Member
Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
Offline
12

quote:


Originally posted by karashi

ChemicalMachine, it’s all your fault! I’m buying Amadei Chuao by the 1kg block now. Sigh.


The Chuao is DIVINE in truffles. I whipped up a batch of simple, unflavored Chuao ganache and handcoated them in more Chuao.

William Curley also does that – definitely a signature item. Yes, Chuao is almost the perfect truffle chocolate because of its strong flavour that doesn’t get smothered by cream, and the excellent melting properties that you allude to (it usually doesn’t “break” the ganache)

quote:


It was surprisingly easy to temper as well. I’m not sure what the health ramifications might be of eating a kg of chocolate a month, though.


Well, they can’t be that bad because I have considerably more than that per month and I’m still alive [;)]

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com