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baking a cake
November 3, 2004
3:22 pm
alex_h
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hi everyone,

any simple recipes for a simple chocolate cake (using good chocolate) you can recommend?
i am not very adept in baking but thought something simple i might be able to handle.

November 3, 2004
6:23 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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The simplest and indeed the chocolatiest cake recipe is a Chocolate Decadence cake, which is essentially a flourless cake that calls for chocolate, butter, and eggs. It's more or less, a giant chocolate truffle, in a sense, but the flavor is outstanding and full forward. Many recipes exist, and all you have to do is search online for them. I have some recipes, though, for Chocolate Decadence as well as many other good chocolate desserts, but I have to search for them first.

November 3, 2004
10:49 pm
alex_h
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ooh! good idea! i think i know what you are talking about.
my favorite chocolate shop has one of these made every day and it is heaven (and hell for the waistline ;)
thanx

November 4, 2004
3:41 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Yeah, to be honest, I'd rather just eat a bar of chocolate hehe.

November 4, 2004
3:53 pm
alex_h
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of course, of course. but you have to admit that a nice birthday cake can also be quite appealing ;-)

November 4, 2004
5:41 pm
Lone Ly
Oslo, Norway
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Any recipes to recommend, Monte? I have tried a couple of those, but too often I think they taste too much of eggs (or omelette) when flourless. I think there is a recipe on Amedei's web pages. (1 kg blocks of 70% are even cheaper here now (24 eur) so I am planning to experiment more frequently.)

Alex, I prefer chocolate fondants, ie. brownie/muffins/cakes "underbaked" (as a friend put it) - with fluid centre. Heston Blumenthal used an interesting recipe with blue cheese. I think I have it somewhere if you're interested.

Chocolate is cheaper than therapy and you don't need an appointment.

"Man cannot live by chocolate alone - but woman can." (Unknown)
November 4, 2004
8:05 pm
alex_h
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hi lone!
"long" time no hear. hope u r ok. i know what u two are talking about. i think in the end i will be lazy and just buy one ;)
i think they call it gateau du chocolat here or something like that. there's another name too.

btw, lone, did u send the chocolate? i can't wait!

March 21, 2005
7:32 am
Manuel
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March 21, 2005
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Hi,

excuses my English because is very bad. I desperately need the recipe on how making a cake with the center of chocolate and green cheese. I saw in "Kichen Chemestry" by Heston Blumenthal. Unfortunately I could not take notes.

March 21, 2005
10:45 am
green
Trondheim, Norway
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November 19, 2004
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quote:


Originally posted by Montegrano

The simplest and indeed the chocolatiest cake recipe is a Chocolate Decadence cake, which is essentially a flourless cake that calls for chocolate, butter, and eggs.

I'm very interested in a recipe with only these ingredients. Trying to avoid carbohydrates as much as possible, and white flour doesn't fit in with such plans... Do you have a good one for me?

March 22, 2005
5:43 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Yes, as a matter of fact I do. This recipe is actually one from Rose Levy Berenbaum and tastes really good.

1lb chocolate
1/2 lb butter
6 large eggs

1. Preheat oven to 425 F (218 C).
2. Butter and line the bottom of an 8" spring form pan. Wrap
outside in a double layer of heavy foil.
3. Over a double boiler, melt the chocolate and butter.
4. In a large bowl set over a pan of simmering water heat the
eggs, stirring constantly to prevent curdling, until just warm
to the touch. Remove from the heat and beat, using the
whisk beater, until triple in volume and soft peaks form
when the beater is raised, about 5 minutes.
5. Use a large whisk or spatula to incorporate 1/2 of the egg mixture into the chocolate. Then fold in the remaining eggs until almost no streaks remain.
6. Scrape mixture into the spring form pan and smooth with spatula.
7. Set the pan inside a larger pan and surround it with approximately 1 inch of very hot water.
8. Bake for 5 minutes, then cover loosely with buttered foil and bake for another 10 minutes.
9. Allow to cool for 45 minutes.
10. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until firm, about 4 hours.

March 22, 2005
11:08 am
green
Trondheim, Norway
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Sounds delicious! Can't wait to try it, but I guess I'll have to wait untill after easter...

March 22, 2005
5:03 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Why do you have to wait until after Easter?

March 22, 2005
7:01 pm
green
Trondheim, Norway
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I'm home at parents for the holiday, and tomorrow i'm going to out cabin in the mouintains. Hard to get good chocolate in norway, i tell you, and even harder up there in the mountains! ;)
But then i have something to look forward to when these lazy days are over to :)

March 22, 2005
9:16 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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March 17, 2005
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My basic recipe 's very similar, only much less butter and some eggs replaced by egg whites:
250g 70% chocolate
1 tbsp butter
2 eggs separated and 4 egg whites
It's a smaller quantity, which normally will serve my dinner party of 8. Wisk all egg whites over boiling water quickly, like for italian merangue, so they will not collapse. Can just wisk them, till stiff but not overdo it, sould be still slightly shiny, not too dry. Melt butter and chocolate over boiling water as well and wisk in it egg yoks. Combine, with 1/3 of whites first, and the rest more carefully and fill the ramekins by 2/3 - better still chill the mix before baking. Bake at 180C (160C for fan oven) for 6 min only, so the centre will be runny. It will still get cooked while u r getting them to table.
Now what that blue cheese recipe of Blumenthal? Just loved his Fat Duck. I know he says to use only egg whites, which is fine as well for this souffle recipe, but he apparently does not wisk them at all. Has anyone tried?

March 23, 2005
9:59 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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Dear Manuel, would love to find that recipe myself.Have not seen the programm.May be you can contact the TV programm directly and ask for their archival information. Good luck, let us know.

March 24, 2005
5:44 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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It depends on how much he beats the egg whites, but it seems that this cake is more dense than fluffy. Sometimes, a brief whisking is necessary in order to break up the proteins a bit to facilitate incorporation with the rest of the ingredients. But a lot of times you'll see instructions to beat the egg whites until "stiff peaks" form. This aerates the egg whites and thus adds volume, or "fluffiness," to the baked good. Almost always, you'll see "fold egg whites into mixture" afterwards. Blumenthal's bleu cheese chocolate cake might not call for egg yolks because of the already high amount of fat in the recipe, but the binding properties of the protein in the egg whites are necessary.

March 24, 2005
12:17 pm
ellie
london, United Kingdom
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Blumenthal says that he'd started with classic now recipe of hot runny chocolate cake made famous by Nobu chef, Matsuhisa. And gradually found no need for sugar or flour( or cornflour), even little as it was. This is alien to some people - cake w/o flour, but i found as well long time ago, experimenting, that cocoa in chocolate "holds", gives the texture. Blumenthal also found that yoks spoil, overpower chocolate taste and using only whites gives it much "cleaner" taste.

March 25, 2005
3:36 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Flourless cakes are actually quite common and are usually referred to as chocolate torts or as Chocolate Decadence. It's a basic, fool-proof recipe that involves chocolate, eggs, and butter. Essentially, it's a giant truffle and is ultra rich. The eggs and butter will soften the cake and provide a slight gelatinization required for the cake to set.

April 1, 2005
8:48 pm
marioh
Bonn, Germany
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January 28, 2005
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19

I like this recipe

For a 24cm diameter form take for the biscuit

200g dark couverture (Manjari couverture is perfect, believe me)
6 eggs, separated
150g powdered sugar
half vanilla pot
150g butter (at room temperature)
100g sugar (think about taking a dark unrefined one, for example Billingtons dark Muscovado)
100g grounded almonds (really fine grounded!)

for the glaze
200g sugar (take white sugar here)
125ml water
150g couverture

1.melt couverture

2.beat the egg whites and add the sugar (it has to be really creamy)

3.beat egg yolks until they whiten. Then add vanilla and the powdered sugar. Beat. Add the butter and beat until homogeneous (as longer as you beat it, as better it will be)

4.take egg yolk mixture and add the melted couverture. Stir. Add almonds. Stir. Now add the egg whites, but be careful!

5.put in a buttered form and bake in a preheated oven at 160 to 170 degree Celsius. After 12 minutes take temperature down to 150. Bake now for approximately 60 minutes.

6.making the glaze:
combine water and sugar and bring to a boil. Let cool down a little. Add the couverture and stir until completely melted up. But the glaze on the cooled cake.

The best about this cake: You can store it for more than a week! It will get better each day!
I just hope you can understand what I have written. My “recipe”-English is as good as it should be.

April 11, 2005
3:23 pm
green
Trondheim, Norway
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November 19, 2004
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Monte: tried your cake-recipe last week, and it was incredible! Really a "melt on the tongue" thing, and so easy to make! (I made only half the recipe, and in order to reduce carbs I used 50/50 of cavalier and valrhona, so with 100% "real" choc it would supposedly get even better.)
But anyway, thanks! It was great :-D

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