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Chocolate & cheese
February 16, 2006
8:31 pm
Marcellus
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Has anyone any ideas for coating cheese with chocolate? I was thinking of maybe a cream cheese with a dark chocolate coating or maybe filling chocolate truffle spheres.
I suppose a low salt cheese would be best but would appreciate any advice

Thanks

February 16, 2006
9:57 pm
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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I have heard of goats cheese being used before but must be honest and say I’ve never actually seen/tried it myself. I have seen recipes for ganache made from cream cheese.

February 17, 2006
12:56 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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A low salt cheese doesn’t necessarily mean that it will be the best candidate. Try experimenting with various cheeses and see what suits your tastes. As far as pairing cheese with chocolate, I can’t recall ever hearing about anyone simply coating a block of cheese in chocolate, but I know there are truffle recipes where the “ganache” (and I use that term loosely in this context) was simply melted chocolate and softened goat cheese. It works very well. And I have tasted cheese truffles too, some of which can be a bit strong, while others can be almost impossible to detect. You have to find the perfect balance, otherwise it will be too sour or too bland.

February 17, 2006
9:59 am
Snowbeast
Linköping, Sweden
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January 18, 2006
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Slightly off topic, but I had to laugh when I saw this thread – I have a friend who dips pieces of milk chocolate into cheese fondue. I really DON’T recommend it. [;)]

Otherwise, I have made Easter truffles using cream cheese, sugar and vanilla (can’t remember if any cream was added, don’t think so), rolled in ground coconut and dipped in dark chocolate. They were delicious but a pain to make as the filling was so soft. There are plenty of recipes on the net for this kind of thing.

And as Monte points out, don’t be scared of using a fairly salty cheese – salt goes very well with chocolate (personally I think it pairs best with milk chocolate). I have also tried goat’s cheese ganaches, and have found that the chèvre flavor becomes a bit muted – over Xmas I tasted truffles which had a ganache of melted chocolate and a Swedish product called “messmör” – it’s basically sweetened whey which has a sourness similar to goat’s cheese. Unfortunately the truffles were made with el cheapo chocolate, so the result was appalling – but there was potential.

Why don’t you try making a truffle simply filled with e.g. chèvre and chili-infused cream, in a milk chocolate shell?

February 26, 2006
8:43 pm
Marcellus
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Thanks all for advice.
I bought some goat’s cheese and combined it with a little white chocolate to firm it up then dipped pieces into a standard callebaut dark chocolate – would have preferred something more bitter but it’s all I had. Tasted good and family enjoyed. You’re quite right – salt flavour came through but didn’t impair overall taste. If anything, the sugar in the dark chocolate took the edge off the flavour for me. I’d say that dark chocolate and goat’s cheese on its own is a good combination but I definitely need truffle spheres as cheese is too loose to dip.

March 2, 2006
3:29 pm
CUChocoProf
Ithaca, USA
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I once had the opportunity to sample chocolates from Chile, alas not imported here. Blue cheese cream filling, another was goat cheese (very subtle) with chives. The chocolate casing was extremely thin. And Jean Paul Hevin in Paris also offers some cheese-filled delights, I believe he uses Pont Levesque and Rocquefort. I’d give a try to rolling some softened light blue cheese, freezing or cooling it then dipping in Callebaut’s Santo Domingo. If using cream cheese, because the medium is so adaptable, I’d add a few drops of say Frangelico, then coat with a milk chocolate at higher than average concentration (say 35-40%). Wonder though if you’re not dipping, how you might pair chocolate and cheese?

Jordan L. LeBel
Associate Professor
School of Hotel Administration
Cornell University
243C Statler Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853-6902
USA
“Food is like love; it should be entered into with abandon or not at all.” Harriet Van Horne

Jordan L. LeBel Associate Professor School of Hotel Administration Cornell University 243C Statler Hall Ithaca, NY 14853-6902 USA "Food is like love; it should be entered into with abandon or not at all." Harriet Van Horne
March 2, 2006
3:43 pm
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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If you’re not dipping, that’s easy. Just melt and combine the cheese and chocolate, roll into balls, and then roll in cocoa powder.

March 2, 2006
4:00 pm
Marcellus
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Yes, the problem is the texture of the filling as Snowbeast said. I ended up by coating it with about 2 0r 3 times the thickness I wanted because it was so difficult to keep the cheese together. I did think of putting in freezer and will try this next time. How about condensation when the cheese is removed from freezer? On second thoughts, my chocolates will be eaten quickly (I hope!) so shouldn’t be a problem.

March 2, 2006
6:17 pm
Snowbeast
Linköping, Sweden
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Don’t forget that if you freeze the filling and then coat, the filling will squirt out as the truffles come to room temperature. Quite an amusing experience the first time it happens – like little worms all over your truffles!

I reckon your best bet with cream cheese is to either make a runny filling and use molds or else possibly roll the cream cheese ganache in something before dipping to give it some (temporary) extra stability. How about a mixture of powdered sugar and cornstarch, the coating of choice for Turkish delight?

July 3, 2006
12:07 pm
Domenico
Budapest, Hungary
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I just gave a try to one of my sommelier friend’s hints: take a very thin slice of slightly smoked hard goat cheese, and some Chuao for gastronomy. Then melt and temper the Chuao, fill into the rolled slice of cheese and cover it with the tempered Chuao. Wait until it solidifies, and serve it with lemongrass leaves. Pair with a full bodied, balanced “grand vin” with predominant black fruit notes and round tannins (we used a Hungarian wine, Tiffan’s Grande Sélection 2003). We used a type of Hungarian goat cheese but I suppose any sufficiently subtle, smoked hard goat cheese will go. It is as fantastic as simple!

September 4, 2006
8:04 pm
boycie
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I was shown a Gorgonzola ganache – exactly that; white chocolate, cream, gorgonzola. It was put with a slice of mango jelly and then dipped as a whole chocolate. Not my cup of tea, but the cheese bit was quite nice.

Emma

Thank you!
September 5, 2006
6:43 am
Hans-Peter Rot
USA
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Somewhat related, but somewhat not. I’ve tried a Slitti bar and a few Domori bars where cheese was a dominant flavor, namely bleu cheese. At first, I was confused and estranged but grew to like it a lot. Granted, I’ve never actually tried bleu cheese mixed with chocolate but when I do I will assume the flavor will be similar to my encounters with the aforementioned bars. But I’ve tasted a Teleggio truffle once and was left asking, “Where’s the cheese?”

January 16, 2007
9:06 pm
chokolaj
Hamptons, USA
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February 18, 2006
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I tried a single origin from Pralus, “Indonesie Criollo 75%”. It was very pungent, reminiscent of blue cheese. I would imagine they would pair well together.

-Daniel
http://www.chokolajchocolate.com

-Daniel www.chokolajchocolate.com
April 28, 2007
7:06 pm
sprunty
London, United Kingdom
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April 19, 2007
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Wow, those gorgonzola ganaches sound delicious!

Has anyone tried the cheesy, spicy, sweet and sometimes fried Indian desserts? Starting from a base like that and using it as a filling might make a really good chocolate.
And firm ganache, mozzarella, lambs lettuce and pepperoni on crusty bread is like the best sandwich ever.

sprunty ^_^

http://www.naturallyindulgent.com/

sprunty ^_^ http://www.naturallyindulgent.com/