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Bulk Truffle making
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Sobo
london, United Kingdom
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March 26, 2008 - 1:34 pm
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Hi

I run a small chocolate company, and we are starting to rapidly expand, which is very excting.

We only make a small selection of truffles, but are looking to streamline our production, I wondered if any of you have any advice on making bulk ganache.

At present, we grind up the chocolate and add boiling cream to it. Then we stir it up. Making in such large quantities - i.e. 1.5kg a time means that we have to add this to a water bath/bain marie to finish off. Does anyone have a better way of doing this - i.e. has anyone had any success with adding the hot cream to melted (untempered) chocolate.

Also onto the rest of the process - we then have been making slabs, letting it cool overnight, then scooping and rolling by hand. I've tried piping a few times before - but have had mixed success. Does anyone have any tips or tricks to making piping / rolling easier.

Thanks for your help.

James

Sobo

Sobo
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tammylc
Ann Arbor, USA
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March 27, 2008 - 11:18 am
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Get this book, if you can: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Chocol.....038;sr=8-1

He recommends a method for making ganache using melted *tempered* chocolate and cream at 105 degrees F. Very consistent results and totally addresses the melting problem you describe.

As for the piping and scooping... no tips there, really, if you want to keep with the traditional round form factor. You can buy pre-made truffle shells and pipe your ganache into them, but the quality of pre-made shells varies widely. If you're not committed to keeping things round, you can just cut your slab ganache into squares and dip those. Most efficient if you buy a guitar cutter, but they are extremely expensive. You could try the cutting into rough squares and rolling from there rather than scooping.

I used to make exclusively truffles, but switched most of my production over to molded items, which give me more opportunity for elaborate decorative techniques and don't require dipping (which I really dislike doing!)

http://www.tammystastings.com

www.tammystastings.com
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miss coco
coleraine, United Kingdom
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March 27, 2008 - 9:52 pm
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hello james,

i usually have huge difficulty with dipping truffles which i have piped. i find that if i only dip once the chocolate doesnt coat the underside of the truffle and if i dip twice my shell is too thick.

i use callebaut truffle shells, which i hate to admit, but they give me perfect uniform results every time and it makes bulk production 10 times faster

miss coco

a. ferguson

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tammylc
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March 29, 2008 - 12:03 pm
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If you want to do your own dipping without getting shells that are too thick, you can handroll your first coat. It will be much thinner that way - basically like pre-coating the bottom of a slab ganache. Then you don't end up with shells that are too thick.

http://www.tammystastings.com

www.tammystastings.com
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Ephrem
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June 3, 2008 - 1:48 am
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I usually make batches of ganache about 3 kg at a time so I can understand your frustration. I have found that pouring the hot cream over the chocolate and giving it about two minutes to melt the chocolate minimizes the amount of further heating that must be done with a water bath.

As to the other question of using melted untempered chocolate I have read (never experienced first-hand) that making ganache with untempered chocolate may cause blooming and other problems.

I too usually scoop rather than pipe the truffles for dipping. I am interested in more details of your mixed success with piping because I have contemplated doing them this way.

I don't know of any other advice I can offer at this point. I hope this helps a little.

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Aphrodite2
Ongar, Essex, United Kingdom
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June 3, 2008 - 8:21 pm
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Hi James

Like Miss Coco I use shells, I like a uniform shape and they are far easier to dip

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mica
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June 13, 2008 - 12:47 pm
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Hello, We make 30-60 kg of truffle at one time. The ganache is made in a robot coupe (or food processor if you do not have one) by pouring boiled cream over melted untempered chocolate when cooled we add butter and any flavour (alcohol, oils etc). We have had no problems with this method, it give a consistent smooth result every time. If you do not have a food processor you can stir the ganache until combined. We the pipe the ganache into truffle shells, seal them, coat in chocolate by hand rolling and then into cocoa powder or icing sugar or plain. This is very quick and very consistent.

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Marcellus
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June 13, 2008 - 2:14 pm
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Hi James,
You don't have to stick with the spherical truffle. I often just pipe 3 or 4 long cylinders of ganache about 1 inch diameter onto the greaseproof paper and put back in the fridge for about 30 minutes then cut them with a narrow bladed knife into 1 inch lengths. Sometimes the ganache will stick to the blade but not too often.
Otherwise, using a small hacksaw substituting the blade with a piece of wire would probably be a better cutting tool. Then just dip as they are.

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truffles.bg
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March 30, 2011 - 9:32 am
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http://www.truffles.bg/

truffles, truffle, truffe, tartufo, трюфели, трюфел

http://www.truffles-bg.com/

Cool

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truffles.bg
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March 30, 2011 - 9:33 am
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http://www.truffles.bg/

truffles, truffle, truffe, tartufo, трюфели, трюфел

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truffles.bg
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March 30, 2011 - 9:33 am
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truffles, truffle, truffe, tartufo, трюфели, трюфел

http://www.truffles-bg.com/

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Lawrencebrown
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April 21, 2016 - 9:01 am
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Really nice!!

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Bulk Truffle making | Techniques | Forum