A A A
Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
Cold kitchen
Avatar
Heidi
Duluth, USA
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2
Member Since:
April 21, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
May 6, 2008 - 12:16 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Just moved into a new professional kitchen and it is really cold there. The room temp started at 59 degrees and finally warmed up to 64 degrees.
My shells are thin enough because I am turning up the tempering maching beyond what the chocolate would like it to be.
The major problem are my bottoms. They are really thick because they are cooling as soon the chocolate hits the cooled centers and air.
Any suggestions?
Moved out of my old one because it was 84 degrees (shared it with a baker.)

Heidi Ash
Avatar
Ephrem
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 12
Member Since:
June 1, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
June 3, 2008 - 1:27 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I am a new member and noticed that no one has responded to your post. I thought I might lend as much help as I can. First I would like to say I know how you feel. I have had some difficulty controlling temperature and humidity. I live in the upper peninsula of Michigan and people here are fond of saying "If you don't like the weather, stick around another day and it will change." Perhaps some more details from you might help. For example is it a problem of cooling or heating the kitchen? I try to keep our candy room around 66-70 degrees and under 50 percent humidity. If your having problems at 64 degrees you probably only need a slight increase in temperature. You said in your post that it was a professional kitchen. Is there more than one room in the kitchen? Are you refrigerating the centers or keeping them at the same 64 degree temperature? If possible you might try warming the centers slightly in another room. By this I mean somewhere around 68 to 70 degrees. Just a few thoughts off the top of my head that I hope might lead you to a solution.

Avatar
Heidi
Duluth, USA
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2
Member Since:
April 21, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
June 12, 2008 - 5:12 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thank you for your response. Now that summer has sort of arrived in Northern MN the large one room kitchen is warmer. I now usually have to cool my centers to firm them up before filling them.
Thank you for your response.

Any idea about desiccants to eliminate a new problem I'm having with the arrival of summer-humidity? Bringing the Cambro cooler inside of the big cooler has helped. Putting the ice packs in plastic or a Canbro carrier has also helped.

Thank you again,
Heidi

Heidi Ash

Heidi Ash
Avatar
Ephrem
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 12
Member Since:
June 1, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
June 13, 2008 - 12:50 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I don't know much about desiccants, but I do have a few other questions. What is the approximate size of the room? Have you considered the possibility of dehumidifiers instead?

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 89

Currently Online:
16 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

Hans-Peter Rot: 1462

alex_h: 1170

Martin Christy: 614

Masur: 592

Sebastian: 430

Lone Ly: 397

Newest Members:

tillicity

RossPele

Saul V

Ricardo Ulloa

Reynerio Solis

Raul A Santos

Forum Stats:

Groups: 7

Forums: 26

Topics: 1825

Posts: 10538

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1

Members: 5100

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Administrators: Seventy%

Cold kitchen | Techniques | Forum