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Condensation on Truffles
December 4, 2006
11:05 am
rozzi
Pt. Willunga, Australia
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We make truffles using fresh cream and hand dip in tempered chocolate. We are just in the process of opening a small outlet to sell our truffles and other items. Since the truffles contain cream and no preservative of course they must be refrigerated. So we bought a fridge for almost $4,000 – it is a cake display fridge. The humidity is too high and the truffles are dripping with condensation. What is the solution? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

December 4, 2006
11:34 am
Sebastian
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don’t want to sound smart…but a dehumidifier? there’s a temperature/relative humidity chart that you should be able to find that’ll predict condensation points…you need to find the appropriate T/RH point for your location…

December 6, 2006
5:20 am
rozzi
Pt. Willunga, Australia
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Do others use refridgerated displays for their chocolates and truffles and if so are they specifically designed for the purpose ie low humidity refridgeration? I’m told that I would need to have a refridgerated display custom made for chocolate. A de- humidifier? Well I don’t know exactly what that would be…………….

December 6, 2006
6:13 am
dvdman
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July 7, 2005
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They make displays that are for chocolates specifically. You can set the temp along with humidity. I would give you a website address, but I dont remember where I put it at in my favorites folder. Try searching google.

December 6, 2006
8:43 am
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
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Even without refridgeration the truffles will last 2-3 weeks(depending on the surroundings and amount of moisture inside the truffles). Keeping the temp low will of course help them to last longer and keep their temper(If the outside temp gets very high) and is the better of the two but you can still leave them at room temp and they would be fine(especially during winter right now).

Robert
http://www.chocolateguild.com/vb

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
December 6, 2006
3:39 pm
Sebastian
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mm… i get nervous when i hear hard and fast time frames for shelf life with cream based truffles. W/o having a recipe to know what’s in it, what it’s water activity is, how it was prepared, how fresh the ingredients are, etc – it’s awfuly hard to give a definite hard and fast…Fresh truffles CAN last that long, but there are a ton of variables than can and will affect that…

December 6, 2006
9:19 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
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That is why I said “depending on the surrounding and amount of moisture inside the truffles” Sebastian Sebastian…no just kidding…I probably didn’t make that point clear enough…thanks for correcting me…

Robert
http://www.chocolateguild.com

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
December 6, 2006
9:56 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
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Yeah Sebastian hit on points that I didn’t and they all will have an effect on the shelf life…so it is good to check all those points first and then study your own truffles to see how long they last for your specific recipe and procedure of making them…

Robert
http://www.chocolateguild.com

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
December 7, 2006
11:51 am
Sebastian
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If anyone here needs a testing group to validate the long term stability of your truffles, I’m sure Robert and I could be available to assist. Please send large boxes of mixed truffles on a regular basis to…

8-)

December 7, 2006
12:46 pm
rozzi
Pt. Willunga, Australia
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The Health Dept. requires that any food containing cream must be stored at no greater than 5 degrees. Thanks for the various suggestions. I think I need another fridge…………………

December 7, 2006
8:22 pm
aguynamedrobert
California, USA
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HAHA…I like the way you think Sebastian…I think 3-4 boxes will suffice…a week that is…

Robert
http://www.chocolateguild.com

Some Chocolate Guy http://www.chocolateguild.com
December 8, 2006
5:06 pm
wrks4choc
Hopewell Junction, USA
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February 23, 2006
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12

rozzi;
Another suggestion is a wine cooler. They are perfect for chocolate, low humidity and the temperature can be set right around 55-60 degrees which is optimal. Good Luck!

Keep it Sweet!

Keep it Sweet!
December 9, 2006
12:38 pm
rozzi
Pt. Willunga, Australia
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Thanks for that – I think I might give it a try. Wine coolers are not expensive. Are you sure that they are low humidity?
R.

December 10, 2006
2:17 pm
wrks4choc
Hopewell Junction, USA
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Yes, I am sure, wine coolers usually are a lot lower humidity than your refigerator and you can regulate the humidity levels as well. I know of a premier chocolatier that uses them and I myself have used one.

Keep it Sweet!

Keep it Sweet!
December 10, 2006
3:29 pm
Masur
Stockholm, Sweden
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August 6, 2006
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quote:


wine coolers … you can regulate the humidity levels as well.


I can only change temperature on my wine-cooler (budget version made in China). Is that kind of wine cooler expensive? Any brand?

“Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos” (Maricel E. Presilla)

"Porcelana: The Holy Grail of Pure Criollos" (Maricel E. Presilla)
December 10, 2006
4:15 pm
wrks4choc
Hopewell Junction, USA
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My apologies, Masur, I know of the high grade wine coolers that keep different temp zones, and thought the humidity could be regulated as well, but I think I’m mistaken, I do, however know they keep a consistent low humidity level, and the temp. can be maintained properly for sake of chocolates. They are basically perfect for chocolates, even the lesser expensive ones (the one the commercial co. that I know of is using is Viking, very nice one for their shop about $5,000!!) Hope I’ve cleared that up, sorry about the confusion.

Keep it Sweet!

Keep it Sweet!
December 10, 2006
6:58 pm
Sebastian
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Most decent wine coolers will regulate humidity as well – and the goal is usually to have a relatively HIGH RH level, to avoid the cork drying out. That’s one of the three main reasons wine cellars (actual holes in the ground type cellars) have historically been so popular – they’re cool/stable temps, high relative humidity, and vibration free (temperature fluctuations and/or high temps can wreak havoc with wines, especially with reds – low RH’s dry out the cork, which cracks it and allows excess oxygen in, again wreaking havoc, and vibrations are terrible for aging reds).