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Inconsistent mold coverings
September 17, 2007
11:36 am
newbie
United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 9
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September 16, 2007
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Hi everyone,

I am totally new to chocolate making and am very excited about learning and practising. I have been practising tempering chocolate, so yesterday I decided to try out making filled molds. So I poured some of my tempered chocolate onto the mold, scraped it with both a bench scrapper and an offset spatula, tapped it, and then I turned it over to allow the excess to drip out. I left it upside down for a few minutes, then I flipped it back over. I found that some of the molds were still pretty full of chocolate, while others had nice coatings. So I started scooping the excess out with my finger. Needless to say that didnt quite do the job, and I still had some chocolates in the end that had thick shells while others had perfect shells. What did I do wrong?

p.s. if theres a way to post pics i can show you what they came out like. I was pretty happy with them since it was my first time, and the temper was pretty good, they were mostly nice and shiny and they dropped out nicely.

September 18, 2007
4:49 am
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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Forum Posts: 199
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October 20, 2005
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Hard to tell from the description, but a couple of options.

First, was the chocolate at the correct working temperature? If the temperature was too low, it may not have been able to freely flow out of the moulds when they were held upside down.

Second, when you tip the mould upside down, bang the sides of it with your scraper to start the chocolate flowing out of the cavaties. Usually once the chocolate starts flowing out, it likes to keep going.

Finally, are you using a chocolate that is suitable for moulding? Some couvertures are made for different purposes (although this doesn’t sound like its your issue given the rest of the chocolates turned out well).

September 18, 2007
10:21 am
newbie
United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 9
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September 16, 2007
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I also thought that maybe the chocolate was a little cold since it really didnt flow out that nicely. But then the temper that resulted was nice, so I dont know what to make of that. I thought if its too cold it won’t temper well?

Also, after I flipped it I tapped it from the top (essentially the bottom) not the sides. that might have been a problem too. I didnt want to tap to much because I was afraid of ALL the chocolate coming out. (I dont know if that happens, but when i peeked under to see how it was doing, some of the molds had huge globs coming out, so i started to worry) so some emptied out a lot, and others just held onto the chocolate and didnt really drip anything at all.

Basically, how long should I keep it flipped over for? I also think I need to do a better job at the tapping and I probably over filled them to begin with.

September 18, 2007
11:13 pm
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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October 20, 2005
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Unless you have very “thinned” chocolate you shouldn’t have to worry about too much chocolate coming out. I use a standard Callebaut Select 823 for most of my moulding and I keep the mould inverted and tapping it until no more chocolate comes out. The shells are then nice and thin.

If you do that and the shells look too thin, you can always let them dry and then add another layer by doing the same thing again (ie., refill the moulds, invert, tap and scrape clean).

September 19, 2007
2:12 am
Alex Rast
Manchester, United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 283
Member Since:
October 13, 2009
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quote:


Originally posted by newbie

Hi everyone,

I am totally new to chocolate making and am very excited about learning and practising. I have been practising tempering chocolate, so yesterday I decided to try out making filled molds. So I poured some of my tempered chocolate onto the mold, scraped it with both a bench scrapper and an offset spatula, tapped it, and then I turned it over to allow the excess to drip out. I left it upside down for a few minutes, then I flipped it back over. I found that some of the molds were still pretty full of chocolate, while others had nice coatings. So I started scooping the excess out with my finger. Needless to say that didnt quite do the job, and I still had some chocolates in the end that had thick shells while others had perfect shells. What did I do wrong?


Probably the ones that stayed thick were the ones you did last, and the chocolate was already starting to solidify. Tempered chocolate solidifies fast unless held at temperature, especially with small batches. Larger amounts of melted chocolate take longer once in temper to solidify, for the simple reason that there’s more mass to cool. But with small amounts it tends to be the case that you need to work very quickly.

Alex Rast
Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com

Alex Rast Alex_Rast_Alternate@hushmail.com
September 19, 2007
9:44 am
newbie
United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 9
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September 16, 2007
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ok, so next time ill keep them inverted longer and I dont have to worry about it all coming out. I used El Rey Gran Saman for the shells.
Alex, if it solidifies fast, then is it not a good idea to invert the mold onto my marble slab? I let it drip there because I figured it would be a lot easier to clean, and I can reuse the dripped out chocolate. and I thought since the molded chocolate is not touching the slab, it wont make a difference.

Thanks for the tips! Im waiting for my new thermometer to come so I can try it out again. Ill keep you posted!

September 20, 2007
1:04 am
tammylc
Ann Arbor, USA
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Forum Posts: 23
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March 2, 2007
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Here’s the process i use to make my shells, which results in nice thin shells with a good snap:

1. quickly fill the mold with chocolate
2. scrape off the top
3. rap sharply on the counter to remove air bubbles – 5 or 6 good raps will do it (i use a vibrating table now)
4. turn upside down over my bowl of tempered chocolate – use on offset spatula to take off excess
5. turn upside down over a wire rack over a sheet of parchment, and give a few good shakes to get out any remaining chocolate.
6. place upside down on the wire rack and leave it to set for a couple of minutes
7. After the chocolate has set for a couple/few minutes on the rack and has reached a “plastic consistency” where it’s crystallizing, but not yet firmly set up, i use my offset spatula to scrape the top of the mold to create a nice smooth bottom to my shells
8. Then i turn the mold right side up and put it in the cooler for 5 minutes to finish crystallizing.
9. bring back to room temperature before filling.

If you are simply inverting on to your marble, the globs of chocolate are going to stay in place, because they have no where to go – this is not what you want!

Hope that helps!

http://www.tammystastings.com

www.tammystastings.com
September 23, 2007
8:38 pm
newbie
United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 9
Member Since:
September 16, 2007
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Hi,

Thanks for your tips, I just made my second attempt and these were a lot better. I followed all your tips and the shells were now nice and thin and consistent. I still had a few air bubbles, but it wasnt a major problem. I’ll just try to rap the tray a little harder next time. But I have a problem with the bottoms of the shells. They are not pretty, or consistently flat, they sort of have a dip in the center. Am I scrapping to hard?

On another note, how do you guys store your chocolates? I’ve been wrapping them in foil, putting them in a ziplock bag, and placing them on the bottom shelf in my fridge. But when I take them out, they sweat. How do I avoid that?

Thanks everyone, this forum is amazing!

September 23, 2007
10:12 pm
tammylc
Ann Arbor, USA
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Forum Posts: 23
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March 2, 2007
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How long do you want to keep your chocolates? Even fresh truffles with just cream and chocolate will have a couple of week shelf life at room temperature. I’d avoid refrigeration if you can.

http://www.tammystastings.com

www.tammystastings.com
September 24, 2007
12:08 pm
newbie
United Kingdom
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Forum Posts: 9
Member Since:
September 16, 2007
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10

Oh ok, I didnt know that. I thought since the ganache had cream in it I should keep them in the fridge. But they dont last that long, maybe 3 days at most before we’ve eaten them all!

September 24, 2007
12:54 pm
tammylc
Ann Arbor, USA
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Forum Posts: 23
Member Since:
March 2, 2007
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11

For 3 days you can just keep them on the counter… But if you want them for a little longer sometime, a cool (not cold) dark place is best.

http://www.tammystastings.com

www.tammystastings.com