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Moulding larger objects
December 4, 2006
6:09 am
deb
Calgary, Canada
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Forum Posts: 146
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May 29, 2005
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Help! I am trying to mould a 20cm Yule Log made by CW. The top keeps cracking on me. Do I need to mould in thin layers. For example, line the mould, let it set, then pour another layer? Or, am I moulding to thin and if I mould a real thick layer would that work.? Do I need to spray with a thin layer of cocoa butter first? If you have any experiece or suggestions please let me know. I need to make 22 yule logs for next week.
Deb.

December 5, 2006
5:47 am
deb
Calgary, Canada
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Forum Posts: 146
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May 29, 2005
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Okay, I called Barry Callebaut and spoke to a chef. I also emailed another chocolatier. Both gave me very simular responses. The chocolatier zoned even a little more precise. With large objects you need to mould more than once because the surface area is so large, the chocolate as it chrystallizes will split and crack. So it is better to have several, maybe 3, coatings. I tried this tonight and it worked well. My original pieces weighed less than 80 grams whereas if done properly, a piece weighs closer to 150 grams.
Deb.

December 5, 2006
8:51 pm
gap
Melbourne, Australia
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October 20, 2005
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Thanks for the tip Deb

December 6, 2006
1:25 pm
deb
Calgary, Canada
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Forum Posts: 146
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May 29, 2005
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Your welcome Gap, but now I have a new problem!! I keep getting cocoa butter blemishing spots on the Yule log. It doesn't matter a much I stir the chocolate. It is tempered properly becuase I always test my chocolate and plus I could temper chocolate in my sleep and upside down!! I think what I will do is paint a thin first layer with a paint brush and then do my regular moulding.
Deb.

December 25, 2006
6:53 pm
deb
Calgary, Canada
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Forum Posts: 146
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May 29, 2005
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To prevent the blemishing on larger objects when moulding, you have to heat the moulds up. This is tricky as overheating will cause the chocolate to lose it's temper!! I probably made 60 logs to get 22 suitable ones! It seems that even on smaller objects, if there is a surface area that does not have detail, blemishing can occur. I've have noticed this on a small disc mould that I use for making buttercream cookies and also on a cocoa barry mould that looks like a small (10 gram) log. Chocolate season is now over for a short while. I am headed to Mexico with my whole family and we are going to hand out shoe boxes filled with gifts for the poor in Mexicali Mexico. Should be a good experience for my kids.
merry christmas.
Deb.

Moulding larger objects | Techniques | Forum