• Our rating: 69.6% (2 reviews)
  • Company:
  • Cacao solids: 72%
  • Guide Price: $12.00
  • Description by: Seventy%
  • Production: Produced directly from beans by maker
  • Certification:
    • None
  • Ingredients:
    • chocolate coating minimum 72% cocoa (no vegetable fat)
    • cane sugar
    • lecithin
    • vanilla pod from Tahiti
Pierre Marcolini – Grand Cru de Propriété Mexique: PorcelanaChocolate Review Rating: 69.6% out of 100 based on 2 reviews.

Pierre Marcolini – Grand Cru de Propriété Mexique: Porcelana

When considering Maroclini’s uniform style of dark roasting, a Porcelana may sound like a disastrous endeavor since the bean presents a clear danger of flavor removal, not only from its inherent delicacy but also from its somewhat simple and limited range of flavors. But a Porcelana sourced from Mexico is somewhat anomalous since those encountered thus far have come from Venezuela, and so expectations are understandably ambiguous.

Reviews

Alex Rast: 3-May-2006

Posted: May 3, 2006 by
SCORES Score/10 Weight
Aroma: 10%
Look/snap: 5%
Taste: 35%
Melt: 5%
Length: 15%
Opinion: 30%
Total/100: 100%
INFO
Best before:
Batch num:
Source:
Supplied by:

Least among Porcelanas, a bar that need inspire no sudden rush to try it. Real problems with this chocolate at every point imply Marcolini had a difficult time getting a handle on what to do with it, the net result being a jumble of incohesive flavours. Once again Porcelana shows that if it is a great bean full of potential, it’s a demanding bean to work with, and thus the hype of the name means nothing automatically as to quality. A bar that proves that with Porcelana wild inconsistency seems to be the name of the game.

The Marcolini bar looks classic, if somewhat darker than the lightish red of the standard Porcelana. However, finish is excellent and demonstrates superiour temper along with minimal mould imperfections. Aroma is suspiciously like Domori – pungent, with a beef bouillon note along with a lot of spice: cayenne and clove. Hints of prune complete what is a very intense picture, not by any means your typical Porcelana although as we have noted rather reminiscent of Domori’s style, if not Domori’s specific Porcelana bar.

Sadly, the aroma, acharacteristic though it is, proves to be the high point of the chocolate. The initial flavour is quite promising, pure chocolatey a bit like Valrhona’s Porcelana, but then the flavour becomes flat and cardboardy. Who sucked the taste out of the room? Next comes the vanilla, cookie flavour that really suggests Dutching, which if it has been done is completely inexplicable in a cacao which should *never* be processed in this way. Finish improves upon this somewhat, with wine notes and a blackberry finish, but ultimately the bar can’t recover from the abysmal middle flavour.

Texture, too, is just not up to snuff, coarse and fudgy. It’s also decidedly dry and grainy, as if the chocolate somehow lost temper – and yet the initial finish makes it clear that that result never occurred. It’s just a chocolate that seems to have been stillborn: poorly conceived and executed, failing to deliver the wonderful flavour notes that Porcelana can. Those who know me will recognise that I have never been the strongest fan of Marcolini, but in his defence, Porcelana is to chocolate what Pinot Noir is to grapes: capable of greatness but terribly finicky. Marcolini may simply have been stuck with a less-than-perfect batch. Not much you can do about that but try, try again, and perhaps really take care with sourcing. Like Pinot Noir, terroir seems to be far more important with Porcelana than with other beans, and Marcolini might consider a second stab at the bean – this time from a better source.

Hans-Peter Rot: 8-Dec-2005

Posted: December 8, 2005 by
SCORES Score/10 Weight
Aroma: 10%
Look/snap: 5%
Taste: 35%
Melt: 5%
Length: 15%
Opinion: 30%
Total/100: 100%
INFO
Best before:
Batch num:
Source:
Supplied by:

Unlike Marcolini’s other bars, this one is by far the lightest, bearing a shade that crosses dark tan and orange rust, while the appearance stays on track as no blemishes can be detected by the naked eye. Aroma is also divergent but interesting nonetheless, being neither typical of previously encountered Porcelanas nor for Marcolini’s usual darkened scents. It’s very light, ejecting orange and sweet almond with a slight acidic twang that delivers a buttermilk likeness.

The flavor commences on a promising note: purely chocolaty but neither too strong nor too weak, it’s perhaps in line with Cluizel’s Noir de Cacao 72%, but unfortunately things dwindle as this flavor is supplanted by less impact. Sweet almonds follow, then spice but the overall profile declines dramatically as the acidity picks up and overpowers the length, which together with the gritty and fudge-like texture, delivers an overall effect that leaves much to be desired in the end.

Building great excitement, then sending it spiraling into disappointment, Marcolini’s Porcelana is at the bottom of his performance and begs the question, “”Is the quality good enough?”” Perhaps it is, but the results here certainly do not lend support, nor do they instill promise for a previously unattempted and ambiguous origin of this oft prized bean. Still, this is definitely worth a try, but do not expect the same quality that Porcelana is known to deliver.

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